elantra n

The News for August 20th, 2021

Welcome to the Hooniverse News! As always, this is a weekly recap of the biggest stories in the automotive industry without the fluff or bull. This week: NEW NISSAN Z OMG, Hyundai makes a performance car out of the Elantra, Genesis shows off their first EV, there’s a new GT Heritage Edition, Ford made some new Mustang special editions very white, the Explorer is getting some new performance editions, and Ford Performance is working on an electric crate motor.

There’s a new Nissan Z!!!!!1!!

new nissan Z

By far the biggest news of the week was the new Nissan Z. Years of leaks and speculation culminated in a new generation of the legendary Z sports car that, by and large, seems to be getting positive feedback. Jeff covered it in a good amount of detail earlier in the week, so I won’t need to talk about it here. Head on over to his piece for all of the info you need.

Hyundai Elantra N

elantra n

The N-ing of Hyundai’s lineup continues with the 2022 Elantra N, a sporty and fun variant of a car that you’d otherwise never associate with the words sporty and fun. It takes the heart and soul of the groundbreaking Veloster N and stuffs it in a car that some buyers may find more convenient and practical. The Elantra N will join the Veloster N and Kona N when it goes on sale later this year. Not to be confused with the N Line stuff, which is a lighter performance upgrade and appearance package and is already available with the Elantra, this is the real deal.

elantra n

The powertrain should be familiar by now. It’s the same 2.0-liter, turbocharged, direct-injected four cylinder engine as found in the Veloster N and Kona N. Some highlights include its 276 horsepower and 289 lb.-ft. of torque, its flat power curve ensuring that max power is available from 5,500 RPM to its roughly 6,700 RPM redline, and its standard six-speed manual gearbox with available eight-speed DCT.

Living up to its hot hatch roots, the N Corner Carving [electric] Differential, its fully upgraded N suspension, and large 14.2” front brake rotors with high-friction pads ensure it’ll be every bit as fun as the beloved Veloster N. The Elantra N does have a few things that are unique to it though, like the dual-compound insulator in the front suspension for reductions in NVH. It also has four-point strut rings and a rear stiffness bar to strengthen body rigidity (it’s visible from the trunk, too). The car also features an integrated drive axle, which uses WRC rally car tech to integrate the drive shaft, wheel hub, and bearing for a lighter and stronger driveline. The interior is of course fully kitted out with N stuff as well.

elantra n

It’s a full on N car through and through. If it’s anything like the Veloster N which earned high praise from the auto media type people, it’ll be another grand slam for Hyundai. Though I will admit I’m not crazy about the black face paint it’s wearing. Pricing is not available yet.

[Source: Hyundai]

Genesis GV60

gv 60

Now for something just a little different, Genesis has debuted their first EV – the GV60. I’m unsure why it’s not called the EV60 to differentiate it from all the other G or GV models they’ve done already. But since everything’s going electric at some point anyway, I suppose that doesn’t matter. In any event, the GV60 is a battery electric crossover built on the company’s dedicated E-GMP modular platform designed for EVs.

gv 60

If that platform sounds familiar, it’s because Hyundai debuted their Ioniq 5 electric crossover on the same platform. This will be shared across all Hyundai brands with Genesis of course being the luxury version. It’s not yet known what sort of specs we can expect from the electric powertrain. It may be the same as what will be in the Ioniq 5, which has RWD and AWD versions making 225 horsepower/258 lb.-ft. or 230 horsepower/446 lb.-ft. They estimate driving range will be between 260 and 300 miles depending on the model. With it being this early in the race to transition to EVs, I fully expect that powertrain to carry over to the GV60.

gv 60

But what definitely isn’t carrying over is, uh, everything else. The Ioniq 5 is a wild-looking, body, angular shape which looks more like a Lancia Delta revival than an electric crossover. This GV60 features many of the same sweeping, soft lines you’d find on any other Genesis. Its interior is also advanced, open, and elegant… like a Genesis. While it does feature digital side-view mirrors, it should be noted that the car we’re looking at is the Korean spec. The version we get in America will probably not have that, because rules.

The gorgeous Genesis design language can only go so far. I’m not personally a fan. At all. But I dislike most compact crossovers as it stands, so the general public may think differently. No launch timeframe or pricing has been revealed yet.

[Source: Genesis]

Everything Ford showed off this week

ford gt heritage

Leading up to the Woodward Dream Cruise and with the SEMA show coming soon-ish, Ford has had a busy week showing off new products – mostly special editions and some performance parts and accessories. Here’s a quick rundown:

2022 Ford GT ’64 Prototype Heritage Edition

The 6th Heritage Edition Ford GT (of this generation) was unveiled and it’s the first one to celebrate something besides a race win. This GT is inspired by the 1964 Ford GT40 prototype which debuted at the New York international Auto Show that year. It was the public’s first glimpse into the program that would eventually become legend.

To mimic the look of the prototype, this GT wears Wimbledon White paint with Antimatter Blue graphics. There’s plenty of exposed carbon fiber too which also has an Antimatter Blue tint to it, like the wheels, front splitter, side sills, mirror stalks, engine louvers, and rear diffuser. The Antimatter Blue color scheme continues inside with black and blue upholstery all throughout. This tribute is available in very limited quantities and enters production next year.

[Source: Ford]

Ice White Edition Mustang and Mustang Mach-E

mustang ice white

For the first time, a special edition package is shared between a Mustang and a not-Mustang. The 2022 Mach-E, Mustang EcoBoost Premium, and Mustang GT Premium can be ordered as an Ice White Edition.

The appearance package is sort of a throwback to the ‘93 Triple White Mustang. Star White Metallic Tri-Coat paint offers a bright exterior with Oxford White-painted badges and wheels topping off the look. Meanwhile the interior carries the theme with white upholstery and dashboard inserts. There’s not much else to say about these – they’re just white. No word on pricing for the packages or if they’re limited in numbers, but they’re available to order soon and will arrive in dealers early 2022.

[Source: Ford]

Explorer ST RWD and ST-Line

2022 Ford Explorer ST-Line

Ford believes there’s a market for RWD performance SUVs. The Explorer ST has only been available with AWD as is typical for go-fast SUVs. But beginning with the 2022 model year, you can opt for a RWD model because drift Explorer. Or because Ford realizes that not everyone needs AWD, so the ultimate goal is to offer savings to those who only want or need two wheels spinning. Ford won’t hold back in the power department though. The RWD ST has the same 3.0-liter EcoBoost V6 with the same 400 horsepower and 415 lb.-ft. and a 10-speed automatic. You’ll know when it’s available as soon as you see a sideways Explorer in a YouTube thumbnail.

For those who want a sporty edge to their Explorer without springing for the full ST model, you can also equip your Explorer as an ST-Line variant (pictured). It’s basically an appearance package. ST-inspired features like a blacked out grille, dual exhaust tips, blackout treatment for headlamps and taillamps, and 20” wheels can give you the feeling of driving a real Explorer ST but with 100 less horsepower.

2022 Explorers are due in showrooms later this year.

[Source: Ford]

Ford Performance electric crate motor coming soon

Ford Performance couldn’t let GM be the only one selling an electric crate motor. Details will be limited until its full debut at the SEMA show, but Ford Performance teased it on Twitter this week and promised a fall launch date. It will fill the same role as any other crate motor would, but target those who are doing EV or hybrid conversions or an entirely new build. While we don’t know much power it can produce, we do know from the engineering renderings they released that it’ll be a small unit at just 22.4 inches long. Of course, the batteries are the bigger component, but this seems like a size that will make it an easy fit for most projects. We’ll stay on this one for further updates.

[Source: @FordPerformance]

What’s your automotive news?

hooniverse news whats your naws

That’s all I’ve got for you this week, so now it’s your turn. If you saw anything, fixed something, broke everything, or otherwise did anything even remotely car related that you want to share with your fellow hoon, sound off in the comments.

Have a good weekend.

 

I'm the guy that spoiled the site with all the new car stuff. Hooniverse News Editor since 2011, amateur motorsport photographer, sim racer, and mountain road enthusiast.

18 Comments

  1. Like you Greg, I am really not a fan of the Hyundai’s front end design. It’s far too busy and being painted in all black gives it an unfinished look. But those wheels! They are a fantastic design. And I’m glad this car exists.

  2. That Hyundai front is an invitation to aftermarket suppliers and rattlecan enthusiasts alike. 276hp in an economy class sports car – no, the engine is not a surprise anymore, yet, my brain moves slow enough to get excited by the times we live in again and again.

    Meta question to the overlords hanging out in a range of Hooniverse editorial mansions around the world: I remember a time when a Craigslist Crapshoot would routinely harvest 100+ comments. We’re a bit off of that mark now. Has traffic moved to Facebook, somewhere else, or is it just that people don’t comment much anymore? Crazy SAAB attached to lessen the impact of such an existential question.

    1. Personally, my lack of commenting has been due to the general shift in article content. I lurked at the ‘Verse sine its inception, but was finally drawn to comment during the “Is it a muscle car” series and the 1956 Dodge D500 because my Grandpa had one. That’s the type of content that I’m drawn to.

      We had almost daily Hooniverse Asks (and Emslie himself said that was too much work) that would elicit a lot of responses and the Crapshoot was a lot of fun. I still read juuuuust about everything that gets thrown on here, but honestly, I don’t have a strong enough opinion about a new Defender, or a new Hyundai, or a new [insert make and model here] that make up the majority of content. I suppose that’s just the nature, you can only do so many stories on old, homebuilt race cars or diesel Scouts or anything old and/or wacky before they get repetitive.

      1. I agree. I’ve been here for a long time too and came because of the unique content – Hooniverse asks, Craigslist Crapshoot, Encyclopedia Hoonatica (or something like that) and the charming ramblings of Longrooffan. New car reviews are fine, but every site does them. I came here for different stuff and much of it is gone.

        That and the recent comment system issues (better now, but not great) have dampened my Hooniverse enthusiasm.

        1. There used to be a lot more daily content, too. Most of it was that special flavor stuff. But some of the prior content authors have gone on to write for sites that operate on more than a shoestring, and others have had real life get in the way. And, yeah the comment system still sucks. The change to the comment system at another site is what got me to start commenting here a decade ago.

          1. “The change to the comment system at another site is what got me to start commenting here a decade ago.”

          2. Ha, I recognize everything being said here. Kinja has always been a catastrophe, but the latest iteration is just hilarious. I get a notification that someone has replied to one of my comments, click on it…and I can neither find my own comment, nor the reply to it, which the notification alerted me to. This system is actively inhibiting discussion, basically doing the opposite of what it is designed to do. That makes me more annoyed than I have any right to be, but, come on, how…?

            I also miss a lot of the classic Hooniverse stuff. Still checking in basically every day and the content remains good, just wondering if the conversation has migrated to somewhere else…or if traffic is significantly down, too?

          3. Yeah, I wish this system was better, but commenting on Jalopnik is a train wreck. On my phone it takes 3 page loads to get to where I can read more than one comment, let alone comment myself.

          4. I tried to reply to a comment nested below mine above, but this new system apparently only nests to the fifth level deep.

            Anyway, one thing I forgot to mention was that in the “good old days” there was a lot more interaction in the comments. Now, there are a lot fewer author’s comments after an article (Jeff seems to be the main source of those).

            The way to keep readers engaged is to engage with the readers.

          5. Oh yeah, I’m the first to say work and more work and other work has come in the way of offbeat content producin’ things in recent years. However, rather than just tweeting the first off the cuff thing that comes to my mind about something automotive, I’ve recently come around to writing more longform thoughts. Hooniverse’s my first home for actual published stuff and since it’s actually *10 YEARS* soon since I started writing here, it’s only well and good that I actually write more for the site again.

    2. I could easily reply 100+ times, but that would be rather boring for me to do and for you to read, wouldn’t it?
      Joking aside, I don’t have opinions on the new XY, aside from obvious “that’s nice/ugly/expensive/cool/not for me”, but sometimes I might post something like that.

      I’m here for entertainment, not consumer advice, and yes, the commentariat here is part of the experience – albeit everybody was busy lining up for toilet paper/tests/vax shots throughout the last 18 months.

      The comment system still doesn’t put me off, although I still didn’t bother to get an account and avatar.

  3. Yesterday I took my car to a local shop to look at a problem I knew I wasn’t gong to have time for in the next couple days.

    I pulled in and a mechanic came up to the car. He told me to come into the office so he could get my phone number. “Oh, by the way, we’re closed”. I asked if I caught him on vacation, since it was about 9 am. “No, we’re out of business”.

    The owner has had the building for sale for a long time, at least 7 years. He opened the shop in the 70’s and told me a couple years ago that when the property sells, he is retiring. The property sold. I tried to find out whether he got somewhere in the ballpark of his ask, or just couldn’t wait for the right offer, but he wasn’t in the mood to talk. I suppose that indicates the latter. I should have made an offer–the building has fantastic Modern architecture and plenty of space.

    Anyway, they are fixing my car, but I suppose the warranty is going to be about a week.

  4. Lots of GR86 test videos out this week and all seem pretty positive. No pricing yet for Australia though and it’s about 6 months from going on sale here.

  5. That Elantra N sounds great, but the aesthetic is disappointing. The LeBra inspired nose, the comically large hood badge and the JC Whitney wing make a serious sport model look like a teenager’s custom.

    The final sealer goes on the barn floor today. The builder has a couple of small things to wrap up, but it’s essentially done. I’ll start moving things in next week.

    1. So when are you going to have us over for a beer and to stand around and look at the car not fixing itself?

  6. I miss the regular Hooniverse oddball stuff, too. I don’t visit near as much anymore and new vehicle reviews isn’t why I started coming here.

    And yeah, the current commenting sucks but such is life.

  7. I love that the Hyundai exists, and will definitely attempt to check one out. However; “The car also features an integrated drive axle, which uses WRC rally car tech to integrate the drive shaft, wheel hub, and bearing for a lighter and stronger driveline.” sounds like an absolute maintenance nightmare for a shade tree mechanic. Hopefully I’m wrong.

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