Hooniverse Asks: What’s an undesirable version of a car… that you desire?

“No real Porsche fans like the Targa,” says everyone on the Internet. Good thing I’m not some hung up Porsche fan then, I guess. I’ve never drooled over or dreamed of owning a Porsche 911. They’re wonderful cars, but I typically have visions filled with lumpy V8s. Still, I could see myself owning one some day in the future. Which one would I want? I’ll take one with a Targa roof please.

I don’t love convertibles. But having the ability to occasionally let in the sun or rushing wind sounds great. I remember really enjoying my Z31 Nissan 300ZX back in college, when I had the t-tops removed and stowed in the rear hatch. I have to assume the feeling would be even better with a Porsche 911.

It would be great if these remain undesirable as every other old Porsche out there keeps climbing in value.

What about you? What’s a vehicle that you find desirable, despite the main fan vase of that given vehicle thinking otherwise? Share your illicit loves in the comment section below.

Oh, and the Porsche 911 in the image above… I found it listed for sale on Craigslist. It’s located in Oceanside, California. The asking price is a bit under $43,000. Too rich for my blood. And the listed mileage is, ahem, a bit eye-watering. Otherwise, it’s a lovely looking thing, no?

57 Comments

  1. Two-wheel drive Scout 80s! Oh, wait, I’ve already had three of them. Still, I’d love to have another. Everyone wants the V-8 friendly Scout 800 and Scout II, and in 4WD. You can’t even fold down the windshields on those!

    My new crush is the Comet. Not the Mercury Comet but the 1960-1963 weird looking Comet that was sold with no manufacturer badging; a Comet per se. Ford was into that sort of thing back then. When I first encountered one I thought it was a Mopar (it was dark, okay?) Everyone wants a Ford Falcon, so the Comet is right off a second tier collectible, and even then most people want the Comets that look like Falcons.

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/d710d28090a7744fd62f54f861a3d02f21d91fa337cfe8308af3541c6851f56f.jpg

    1. Same, but I’m also good with Sweptside, or Styleside [pictured]

      (This particular 1978 F-150 4×4 was my DD for the terrible northern-plains winter of ’96-’97; picture taken ca. 2008. It still had the chrome strip hiding the upper two-tone transition along the box’s length when I was driving it. I learned to drive 4WD/AWD vehicles in winter from this. I’ve not yet really learned how to drive a FWD vehicle in winter.)
      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/f1a41daf70a2ecdbcf52ffd6ecbce763aa7c921aa6a1c268da482f78daaa102b.jpg

    2. Same, but I’m also good with Sweptside, or Styleside [pictured]

      (This particular 1978 F-150 4×4 was my DD for the terrible northern-plains winter of ’96-’97; picture taken ca. 2008. It still had the chrome strip hiding the upper two-tone transition along the box’s length when I was driving it. I learned to drive 4WD/AWD vehicles in winter from this. I’ve not yet really learned how to drive a FWD vehicle in winter.)
      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/f1a41daf70a2ecdbcf52ffd6ecbce763aa7c921aa6a1c268da482f78daaa102b.jpg

    3. Same, but I’m also good with Sweptside, or Styleside [pictured]

      (This particular 1978 F-150 4×4 was my DD for the terrible northern-plains winter of ’96-’97; picture taken ca. 2008. It still had the chrome strip hiding the upper two-tone transition along the box’s length when I was driving it. I learned to drive 4WD/AWD vehicles in winter from this. I’ve not yet really learned how to drive a FWD vehicle in winter.)
      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/f1a41daf70a2ecdbcf52ffd6ecbce763aa7c921aa6a1c268da482f78daaa102b.jpg

      1. Driving a FWD vehicle in winter is simple: Keep it in gear, and use your momentum. Reverse if you can’t get uphill.

        1. My problem the last time was the FWD car going into terminal understeer trying to negotiate a corner, where applying the dirtbike “when in doubt, gas it out” philosophy was necessary but was against my RWD-biased reflexes.

      1. Without any research in support, I’m sure current value of the Clownshoe would exceed other Z3’s

    1. I’d find one of the teeny tiny handful of four-door hardtop Sprints they purportedly made…and park it next to one of the teeny tiny handful of ’64 Olds 442 four-door sedans made.

    1. I just sold my ’86 Country Squire actually. So yeah I know what you mean. Oddly for a Gen X’er I went backwards and got a Corvair.

  2. Two-wheel drive Scout 80s! Oh, wait, I’ve already had three of them. Still, I’d love to have another. Everyone wants the V-8 friendly Scout 800 and Scout II, and in 4WD. You can’t even fold down the windshields on those!

    My new crush is the Comet. Not the Mercury Comet but the 1960-1963 weird looking Comet that was sold with no manufacturer badging; a Comet per se. Ford was into that sort of thing back then. When I first encountered one I thought it was a Mopar (it was dark, okay?) Everyone wants a Ford Falcon, so the Comet is right off a second tier collectible, and even then most people want the Comets that look like Falcons.

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/d710d28090a7744fd62f54f861a3d02f21d91fa337cfe8308af3541c6851f56f.jpg

    1. Oh, interesting. My first car was one of these, the dream vehicle of my childhood:
      https://i.ibb.co/P15p6YR/DVW0i-ADWs-AA8-ZUL.jpg
      But the same day I bought it, I also checked out a 144 that I really liked. So years later, I got myself a 145 that was better in almost every way – more solid, way more “stylish”, better materials. Just a little more anciently designed. By collectors though, the 140 has been treated as a donor for Amazon interiors and 240-compatible parts for decades, and it has only lately become a collectible in its own right. But popular it is not.
      https://i.ibb.co/KsxJwCk/69volvob20.jpg

    2. The Comet was originally slated to be an Edsel, but when that venture went bust Ford decided to sell it through Lincoln-Mercury dealers. I’m guessing it was a standalone marque at first because that’s what Edsel was, a bridge between Ford and Mercury.

    3. Oh, interesting. My first car was one of these, the dream vehicle of my childhood:
      https://i.ibb.co/P15p6YR/DVW0i-ADWs-AA8-ZUL.jpg
      But the same day I bought it, I also checked out a 144 that I really liked. So years later, I got myself a 145 that was better in almost every way – more solid, way more “stylish”, better materials. Just a little more anciently designed. By collectors though, the 140 has been treated as a donor for Amazon interiors and 240-compatible parts for decades, and it has only lately become a collectible in its own right. But popular it is not.
      https://i.ibb.co/KsxJwCk/69volvob20.jpg

  3. I want a Mustang II. You know the Mustang that doesn’t exist when you see parts catalogs. Sure I want one with an anemic V8 and a stick shift but I’d settle for a six and a manual as well. Who wouldn’t want the Cobra from Starman but I’d take a good malaistastic one as well. Something that is so seventies that the exhaust sounds like the theme from Three’s Company and the Intake sounds like Maude snoring.

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/05d728eee85b97d4a5a9fc8fb892c960e26fcff72f8dbbaf418ad47c086b224a.jpg

      1. I was sticking to the theme of less popular versions of a model. I don’t know if they made an undesirable P1800. I guess we can go have a seance with The Saint and find out.

        1. Yes, the undesirable P1800 were the cars made by Jensen to…eh…British standards. The ones with the upward bend on the front bumper. But I suppose these are sorted by now, and 1800-values have exploded recently, dragging all versions with it.

          1. Among the local 1800 fanatics the Jensen cars are desirable but the 1800E is still struggling to recover from decades of slowly fading belief that fuel injection is evidence of a pact with the forces of evil (still my own view, of course). Curiously this reaction never seriously impaired the desirability of the 1800ES, though.

          2. Haha, I see that one. But I am also under the impression that a lot of them were retrofitted with the LS of carbs, the darn Webers. Even if these engines run more like a Volvo engine should with SUs.

    1. There’s another car no one wants in that pic. I believe that’s an AMC Marlin top center.

      I wouldn’t mind a 300-six Mustang 2, and I certainly don’t want any of the popular Mustangs. There’s two old ladies that I see in my neighborhood in a green with green vinyl top Mustang 2 and I can see myself in it.

      1. There is an odd subset of us who like the Mustang II. They are starting to gain in value lately for the Cobra and Cobra replicas. Of course the non-Cobras are still holding back which is good. The hard part will be swapping out those nasty four cylinders for a period correct six. I can’t imagine it will be that easy finding one.

          1. Would the 3.5 fit in there? You would need to find one out of a crashed something. That would be a real sleeper.

          2. It would be quite amazing. These are not heavy and a powerful, efficient, non-bro-engine is just what a Mustang II needs. No idea if they would fit though. Even the 3 cylinder would be an improvement.

          3. Only needs to beat 150 horsepower to get passed what the original 5.0 had in the last of the Mustang II’s. That’s not a tough target to hit with a modernish small motor.

          1. “Pintostang! If its good enough for a Charlie’s Angel than it’s good enough for a plebe like you”

        1. Beats me, but I’d shove a 300-six in there, or if I was feeling merciful, a 200 from a Mustang.

          1. Surely the 300 would be too heavy? Pretty sure they were V6 only, and being Pinto based the engine bay would have to be too short

        2. You’re correct– the only six-pot option was the Cologne. I’ve never seen a Mustang II with a 200/250 or 240/300 transplant (I’d be surprised if the latter would fit), but it would be a welcome upgrade over the V6. I hate that engine.

          1. My recollection is that the Mustang II was Pinto based so it could only take an I-4 or V-6. The early Fox Mustangs did have the 250 6 as an option.

    1. I drove an automatic Acclaim once. I think it’s just hitting 60mph now, 35 years later after I floored it

    2. Sounds like every underpowered car from back then, with an auto the accelerator was more like a volume control

  4. I will also throw my hat in the pro-Targa ring.

    Related, I have a huge soft spot for early C4 Corvettes. I know they’re severely outclassed by what came later, but as a child of the 80’s, they look right.

  5. I have an irrational like of the current generation 4 cylinder Ecoboost Mustangs. For me personally, There’s no good way to justify one over a GT, but I still am drawn to the idea of the small engine that puts out that much power and capable of more.

    1. I like those, and the four cylinder Camaro, because they are reasonable substitutes for the S16 Silvia that Nissan is too lame to make.

  6. No one seems to like, or at least that used to be the case, the E36 318ti, but I really enjoyed the one I had. I’m sure the 325i in coupe or sedan form was more sophisticated, but you loose the hatchback versatility.

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