We review the Super73 S1 eBike

The Super73 S1 eBike is a retro-styled electric bike that’s a blast to cruise on and costs $1,995. This is a mid-range bike for Super73. You can jump down to the Z Series bikes or up to the more aggressive R Series machines.

We borrowed the S1 for two weeks and used it for commuting, fun, and visiting socially distant friends. If you want to add an electric bike into your life, you should definitely check out what Super73 has to offer. There are cheaper options and far more expensive options, but Super73 is delivering something fun and well-styled for a good price.

Check out their bikes here: https://super73.com/

[Disclaimer: Super73 let us borrow the S1 for two weeks.]

14 Comments

  1. I’ve been thinking of adding an e-bike for commuter duty (should we ever get out of quarantine) and see a ton of them with fat knobbies. Do they offer this with slicks? FWIW I welcome this sort of content on Hooniverse. If it goes and is fun, it’s of interest.

    ETA: Made the mistake of visiting their site. Yes, slicks are available. The higher trim bikes look awesome. Want.

    1. I wonder if the great rotating mass of those baloney-esque knobbies has a practical use. I would think that the instant torque of an EV would be better at spinning up something so massive from a dead stop than an internal combustion machine. After that they’re essentially flywheels storing energy. I know my old Schwinn Typhoon and Yamaha TW200 used the “once you get it going you don’t need to try so hard” principle to great effect.

      Bonus in this application: they act as the shock absorbers.

    2. I wonder if the great rotating mass of those baloney-esque knobbies has a practical use. I would think that the instant torque of an EV would be better at spinning up something so massive from a dead stop than an internal combustion machine. After that they’re essentially flywheels storing energy. I know my old Schwinn Typhoon and Yamaha TW200 used the “once you get it going you don’t need to try so hard” principle to great effect.

      Bonus in this application: they act as the shock absorbers.

      1. It looks like they are using fat bike tires for a mix of looks and bump absorption. I’ve seen these fat knobbies on the more minibike style offerings while more bicycle like electric hybrid, MTB and cargo bikes use tires closer in size and style to their pedal only equivalents.

    3. Used to do a commute on an e-bike and my advice to anyone would be get a conventional hybrids (as in the frame type) or at most, a MTB frame ebike if you plan to go distance – your range can drop quite rapidly in strong winds so it’s better to have a bike that’s relatively efficient and not a burden to pedai if you’ve no assistance. Not that you want to be left without asstiance, but really if you want range, your motor should only be giving you lots of help to get you up to speed, then when you’re at a steady cruise, pedalling is no real burden and depending on whether the bike has a speed limiter, you’ll just get enough assistance to remove any exertion, like spinning the pedals genly downhill. There’s also the practicalities of negotiating through traffic, so something closer to a conventional bike is safer you don’t want a bike that sits low and you’ll want things like mudguards – unless you live in California I guess.

  2. Jeff blasted through a couple of stop signs, including one at an intersection where a motorized vehicle had just passed.

    Does the ghost bike program apply to e-bikes?

    1. I was in my own neighborhood and eyeballing for any cars, so I figured I was safe. Out on the main streets, obviously traffic rules are followed as relates to this bike.

    2. I think CA has the “Idaho Stop” law that allows bikes to not stop at stop signs if no cars are there. I used to get riled about bike rolling stops until I realized that I never see cars completely stop at them either.

      1. It looks like bikes are still legally required to stop. https://losangelesbicyclelaw.com/safety-laws/stop-signs/

        I’m not as concerned with Jeff being a rulebreaker as I am about him being an idiot. Motorists tend not to notice bikes. It’s even more pronounced when the motorists are not anticipating a bike that goes 24 mph.

        When I was a teen, I was on my bike and hit by a car at a 4-way stop sign. I had the right-of-way according to state law (I had already come to a stop), but the driver of the car had the laws of physics on her side.

        1. Yep, traffic in this neighborhood is minimal especially since it was past time for any one driving to an office to head on out. (maybe 10am or so). But, despite the view of the GoPro, I’m always scanning around – my MTB has made me nervous on the main roads, if I’m transiting between trails, so I’m always keeping eyes and ears out for vehicles.

  3. When you posted this on IG I thought it was just a bike and was kinda silly. After learning that it was electric and watching the video I found that I was trying to figure out how to justify one. I really don’t have a use for one, but I like it a lot.

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