The News for October 22nd, 2021

Welcome to the Hooniverse News! As always, this is a weekly recap of the biggest stories in the automotive industry without the fluff or bull. This week: Porsche shows off Cayman GT4 RS as it laps the ‘Ring, GMC adds new flavors of Sierra Denali, Ford Maverick gets official EPA ratings, the new Range Rover leaks, plus your news for the week.

Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 RS hits the ‘Ring

Cayman GT4 RS

The ultimate Porsche 718 Cayman is due to be revealed next month, but they’re already talking Nürburgring lap times. Legendary brand ambassador and development driver Jörg Bergmeister has lapped the 12.94-mile Nordschleife with a lightly disguised production 718 Cayman GT4 RS in 7:09.300 (or 7:04.511 on the slightly shorter 12.8-mile lap which was previously used for the benchmarks). That shorter lap time is a 23.6-second improvement over the “base” 718 Cayman GT4.

Cayman GT4 RS

Not much is known about the 718 Cayman GT4 RS just yet, but we can certainly get an idea of what it’s all about just by looking at it. Just as the 911 GT3 RS is a much more aggressive and track-focused weapon, the 718 Cayman GT4 RS is as sharp as the Cayman may ever get. Porsche confirms it has everything that characterizes a genuine RS: lightweight construction, more downforce, more power, and greater driver engagement. Bergmeister spoke highly of it as well, calling it “an uncompromising driving machine… the GT4 RS is one of the sharpest cars Porsche has ever developed”.

And because they’re not Tesla, Porsche actually dropped the onboard video proof along with their time. We can learn a bit more about the car through that as well. It sounds like a proper RS with a redline around 9,000 RPM. The only engine Porsche currently produces with a sound like that and a 9,000 RPM redline is the 4.0-liter NA flat-six from the 911 GT3. Knowing Porsche’s track history with the “Cayman Complex” (where a Cayman can never be as fast as a 911), this engine will almost certainly be detuned from the full 502 horsepower. But even a small drop in power would still mean more power than the Cayman has ever gotten and by a big margin. Throw in Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 R tires (which will be a factory option) plus all the chassis and aero upgrades befitting of an RS car, and this is sure to be an instant fan favorite.

[Source: Porsche, YouTube]

GMC Sierra Denali Ultimate and AT4X

(l to r) 2022 GMC Sierra AT4X and Sierra Denali Ultimate

Perhaps more than anyone else, GMC is really cashing in on the “I want the nicest truck on the block” trend that American buyers can’t get enough of. Their Denali grade has always been one of the more sought after pickups, but two new trim levels will aim to draw in even more buyers willing to throw money at things. The Denali Ultimate and Denali AT4X trims will offer two unique flavors to the lineup starting in Q1 2022.

2022 GMC Sierra AT4X

Starting with the Denali AT4X, this new trim combines the best of the existing Denali and AT4 trims for a luxury-focused pickup with good off-road capability that doesn’t compromise its on-road manners or refinement. The truck comes standard with a 6.2-liter V8 and ten-speed automatic transmission, Multimatic DSSV spool-valve dampers with unique tuning, unique springs which increase front and rear suspension travel, two-speed transfer case, various terrain modes with support for one-pedal rock crawling, class-exclusive front and rear e-locking differentials, and Goodyear Wrangler DuraTrac Mud-Terrain tires. Short of a Raptor, ZR2, or a TRX, this is about as good as a pickup can get off road. And its interior will be be nicer than any of those. It features loads of premium leather, dark Vanta ash wood trim, 16-way power-adjustable and massaging front seats, premium microsuede headliner, 15″ head-up display, power sunroof, 12-speaker Bose Premium Series audio, and a bunch more. The off-road improvements negatively impact towing and payload slightly, with its towing rated at 8,900 pounds and payload at 1,420 pounds.

2022 GMC Sierra Denali Ultimate

Meanwhile, the Denali Ultimate is exactly as it sounds – the most luxurious and most advanced pickup in company history. It has the same powertrain as the AT4X as standard but with more normal road-going suspension. Visually it stands apart with an exclusive Vader chrome grille, unique 22″ wheels in low gloss black with machined accents, and its Alpine Umber interior with open-pore Paldao wood trim. It has many of the same tech and luxury features as the Denali AT4X, but with even more leather on various surfaces and even more tech.

2022 GMC Sierra Denali Ultimate

You get GMC’s latest Rear Camera Mirror5 (that cool digital rearview mirror) and standard Super Cruise with a three-year subscription, but with a bonus. The Denali Ultimate is the first to debut with Trailer-Capable Super Cruise, which they don’t go into much detail but I assume that means it supports hands-free trailering along with a host of other trailer-assist tech. “Most luxurious” and “most advanced” are terms thrown around pretty loosely in this industry, but this is one of those trucks where that title is earned.

Pricing has not been announced yet.

[Source: GMC]

Ford Maverick gets official EPA ratings

Top Gun Maverick Ford

Now for something completely different. Ford’s highly anticipated Maverick has gotten its official EPA ratings for fuel economy, and it’s pretty mind-blowing for any pickup. The Maverick is the first pickup in America to come as a hybrid as standard and the benefits are undeniable.

The FWD-only, 2.5-liter hybrid powertrain in the base Maverick earned an EPA-estimated 37 mpg combined, 33 mpg highway, and 42 mpg city. That’s about in line with what Ford projected at the truck’s launch. With a 13.8-gallon tank, 500 miles of fill up should be easily attainable. If you opt for the more powerful 2.0-liter EcoBoost four-cylinder instead of the hybrid, those numbers drop quickly. The FWD EcoBoost Maverick is rated at 26 mpg combined, 30 mpg highway, 23 mpg city. AWD lowers each of those figures by 1.

Ford Maverick

Are those numbers enough to entice you? The first customer-ordered Mavericks are scheduled to ship in December. As with the Bronco launch which has been going so well, those with a reservation will theoretically maybe get their orders first. Reservations for the 2022 model year are expected to fill up next month, after which the order books will reopen for 2023 next summer.

[Source: Ford]

“New” Range Rover leaks

rangeroverleak

Images of the next Range Rover have been leaked all over the internet this week and from multiple sources. The luxury off-roader was expected next week, but someone broke an embargo and caused a chain reaction. The image above was posted to the Worldscoop forum which was taken from a soon-to-be released edition of 4×4 Magazine. From what we can tell so far, this next-generation SUV is another evolution rather than a complete redesign.

Jalopnik has the full rundown on all the leaks which show basically the entire car inside and out, and some of the shots were taken in person. The largest visual update seems to be in the rear with a fairly complex (for an SUV) diffuser/bumper section and narrower, taller taillights. The way it’s all sculpted back there makes it look like it’s doing a McLaren Longtail impersonation. Take a peak at all the leaks and see for yourself. We’ll follow up when the full thing debuts next week.

[Sources: Worldscoop, Jalopnik]

What’s your automotive news?

hooniverse news whats your naws

That’s all I’ve got for you this week, so now it’s your turn. If you saw anything, fixed something, broke everything, or otherwise did anything even remotely car related that you want to share with your fellow hoon, sound off in the comments.

Have a good weekend.

I'm the guy that spoiled the site with all the new car stuff. Hooniverse News Editor since 2011, amateur motorsport photographer, sim racer, and mountain road enthusiast.

16 Comments

  1. That Maverick-and-a-bike-photoshop looks terrible. Or is this a screenshot from a game?
    Last weekend, I changed to winter tires on our cars. I was supposed to change the front brakes on the Leaf, too, but after 2.5 hours of work with penetrating oil and heat, I couldn’t get the caliper clamps off. Yesterday, one of them came off while driving. The worst part is, the same happened last year, and I am afraid a new bolt won’t fix it…the thread seemed tired last year, too. Waiting for new parts to arrive monday before I have another look at it. New car test drive impressions coming up:

    1. On tuesday, I got to drive the EV6 for half an hour. No longer test drives possible as of now, because this was the first car to arrive here, and demand is colossal. This was a great drive, exceptionally quiet, fast, RWD feeling as it should. It is an extraordinarily spacious car with a fantastic interior. Flat floor. Lots of good decisions here, with a good mix of buttons and screens. There’s a screen that functions like buttons, and can be switched from HVAC to GPS functions. The car is priced well, comes with a long range battery and looks awesome. Visibility to the rear is not as bad as feared, which probably means I feared no visibility at all.

      Of course, there are downsides, not really big ones, but they exist. Lane assist is as garbage as in every other car I have tried and the “augmented reality” HUD made me car sick – both could easily be turned off. What did turn itself off automatically in true Hyundai/Kia-fashion was the heated steering wheel. Annoys me every. single. time. There’s also no rear wiper, a stupid decision for the most obvious reasons. The boot is smaller than could have been due to the hatchback design and the fact that the car only comes with huge wheels, starting at 19” and ending at what looks like those Mississippi steam boats. The glass roof is only available in higher trims bundled with useless crap we don’t want, so it’s basically 40k NOK extra – or something like an 8% price rise. D’oh.

      1. On thursday, we had the Ioniq 5 for an afternoon, a night, and a morning. What a cool car, the pseudo-80’s-retro-look and its amazing light signature works well, even though it’s too massive up close. It’s obviously very spacious, more so than the EV6, at the expense of the mid-console buttons the Kia had (heated seats and steering wheel are now screen only; steering wheel still runs cold after 30 mins). Most of the car feels good to the touch and the interior is decent, even though the suede in the doors gets spotty and dirty very quickly. The good visibility is helped by the fantastic Hyundai blinker cameras (which I’d love to have in reverse, too, but that only offers mid-screen and bird’s eye). The long range battery and RWD-combo are 10 hp less than the Kia, but rear wheels are allowed a lot of “slippage”. This thing slides quite a lot more than anything electronically controlled I have tried before. Sliding rear seats, too, like a Twingo! Oddly, the EV6 doesn’t have that. The Hyundai is supposed to be the comfy one, and has superb damping on uneven roads.

        The downside to that is that it feels and drives very “heavy”, much more so than the EV6, even when parking (the car moans). Acceleration feels slower than it is – basically, this one drives like the Polestar 2. Also, holy reflections, Batman! Square, light screen thing that doesn’t fit the rest of the interior and is poorly integrated, reflects a lot in the windscreen. That would annoy me permanently. There is still no rear wiper and no visibility when raindrops don’t blow off, especially with light at certain angles. The boot seems even smaller than in the EV6, which is odd, and I need to check the numbers. It is too small for a vehicle this size, but the sliding rear seats offer respite, of course. There was a rattling sound from the inner roof – fit and finish issues? The flush exterior door handles take some time getting used to and were a bit hard to find in the dark. They should get lit up somehow when approaching with a key in my pocket. Something odd compared to Kia, which also had the recouperation pedals, is that recoup is too strong, even level 1 slows the car down on steep downhill roads. The turning radius is a bit too big, too. Finally, the long lights have a strange distribution, the left light is noticeably weaker than the right front light. Easy to get used to, but there are corners when you’ll miss a better light spread nonetheless.

        1. I’m kind of surprised by how much trouble you are having with the Leaf’s brakes. You would think they wouldn’t cause that must issue if you’re taking them apart every year.
          I must say, the Ionic certainly looks far better in that black and grey two tone than it did in all white of the press photos. It does give it a somewhat 80’s look to it. And it seems odd that neither of those are sold with rear wipers. I thought that was something all hatchbacks have had for quite some time?

          1. For about 5 of 12 months every year, we drive in what resembles brine. It’s an ocean climate all year. That’s really hard on cars. Here’s the bolt/screw that was new a year ago. Indistinguishable from the others, rusted and, for now, impossible to get off. I was under the car yesterday and it turns out I lost another screw where the threads were tired and I presumably didn’t fasten it enough…

  2. It looks like no major automotive news this weekend, which is a relief after an epic weekend of wrenching two weeks ago where we replaced my truck’s fuel pump, a CV axle on the Buick and a less bad band aid on it’s broken muffler mount. I cannot express how much I hate “quick disconnect” fuel line fittings since it took 2 hours and two trips to the store to find the optimum combination of tool and technique to break loose the fuel lines. Actually dropping the tank and swapping pumps was easy. Also modern cordless impact wrenches and ratchets are a godsend. My son’s 18V Makita blasted off the axle nut in seconds and his Milwaukee ratchet made fuel tank work so much easier.
    On the positive side his 18 year old sister is finally managing to drive further than around the block after much cajoling. I don’t think she will ever be enthusiastic or very good but at least we won’t have to chauffeur her and we are one step closer to empty nest status. Also I got my motorcycle out for a run after replacing yet another battery and plan to get maximum value out of the cooler weather before winter. The new new AGM batteries seem a little more finicky but at least the narrower case is easier to remove and install.

  3. There are a few things going on here. Several times now, the X3 has started and then immediately stalled. This happened once in Oregon on my trip several months back, and then last weekend. It started right up afterwards, and ran just fine. Both times it happened, the vehicle had been sitting for several days. No lights, and no codes. At 197k miles though, I’m going to start with cleaning the MAF sensor, and checking the intake boot for cracks and leaks, as I know the latter is a common issue as the engine ages. Any other input is welcome.

    I have a production number and week for the M3, week 46. Dealer thinks it should arrive around the first of the year, if nothing changes. There was a lot of chat about swapping colors on an existing build, so I think someone else bailed on their allocation, and it went to me. One thing that they couldn’t switch was the blue calipers I’d selected (blue, red, or black is a no cost option). Apparently bmw won’t let them even choose a color right now, so I won’t know what color they will be until it arrives. Expectation is gray or black.

    M5 is at the dealer this morning, getting an inspection. I was under it last week for an oil change, and everything looked great, so I’m interested to see what they find. I want something to provide to a prospective buyer. Tomorrow I will take it to a local car wash for a hand wash and interior / exterior clean, take some photos, and get it listed for sale. I’ve been considering going the full 9 yards on it (steam clean undercarriage, high end detail, pro photos, and an auction), and I still might, but first I’ll try and move it the old fashioned way.

  4. My 20-something niece was in town from NYC visiting family, and brought her friend of similar age who had never been behind the wheel of an automobile. My niece taught her friend to drive, including freeway. She wants to get a license now.

  5. I shouldn’t be surprised, but the guy who hit me is now claiming to his insurance company that it was me who changed lanes into him. So it’s my word against his, and they won’t fix my car. I carry no collision on my older cars, so I’m out of luck.

    At the scene the cop told me our stories aligned, so I intend to get the police report. My fear is that what he meant was that we each said the same thing – the other guy was at fault. We’ll see.

    If I have to, the fix is pretty simple – swap fenders. If, big if, I can find one in stahlblau (steel blue) then no paint needed. Of course, coupe fenders are different than sedan fenders, so the odds are against me.

    Second time in ~3 years I’ve been in an accident where the other driver has blatantly lied about what happened and I’m left holding the bag. Probably time to get a dash camera.

    1. What do you know, I got a copy of the police report and it clearly calls out the other driver as “At fault” and me as “Victim”. Now I’m wondering if the driver lied or if simply Geico is trying to avoid paying. I guess it doesn’t matter.

      I submitted that to Geico, let’s see if they still think it’s not their problem.

      1. Good luck! I follow one of the dashcam subs on reddit and the stories emerging from there are often quite Incredible, not at all aligned with how I know insurances work in my part of the world. There shouldn’t be any room for blaming you though as long as the police report agrees with you?

  6. I would hope so, we’ll see how it goes.

    I’m kicking my self for not snapping pics of the car & surroundings immediately after. That could have cleared it up. But I felt pressure to get out of the right of way and didn’t.

    In Michigan, they have “no fault” insurance where it doesn’t matter whose to blame, your insurance takes care of your car. But I don’t carry collision (coverage to repair your own car when it’s your fault) on my older cars, I don’t know how that works then. But also, when we lived in Michigan, our insurance costs were 2X what they are here in Ohio.

  7. I picked up a set of winter tires and plain black steelies for the Kia. I went with smaller 17″ rims with taller tires for a little more comfort and snow grip. Unsurprisingly, they’re a bit more squirmy than the Pilot sports that came with the car.
    The thing that really bothers me with them though is how bloody loud they are. There’s a constant drone going down the highway. They also cause a noticeable vibration. Is this what jacked up Jeep drivers put up with every day?

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