The News for July 1st, 2022

Back to your regularly scheduled mediocrity. The news boy has been offline until this week. I recently moved into an apartment that my ISP said did not exist, even though their equipment was installed by their technician while I was there. That was fun. Anyways, this week: Hyundai stuns with IONIQ 6, Acura gives TLX Type S the PMC Edition treatment, Ford celebrates 75 years of the F-Series, and Red Bull confirms development of a hypercar.

Hyundai IONIQ 6

Auto manufacturers seem to think the best way to stand out in the EV space is to make a wild, futuristic, and unconventional design. Few brands seem to be doing that as well as Hyundai/Kia/Genesis and we got more proof of that this week. Hyundai has taken the covers off the new IONIQ 6, a battery electric vehicle that they describe as an Electric Streamliner. Checks out for sure.

As Hyundai usually does, this first press release is just for show. No powertrain specs or range information was provided. Just a sample of press photos that embrace the synthwave/retrowave aesthetic. They definitely knew what they were doing with that. The streamlined silhouette serves an aerodynamic purpose that’s worth the effort, as its drag coefficient of 0.21 is about as low as it gets for a car. That puts it in Mercedes EQS, Lucid Air, and Tesla Model S territory. And it’s a Hyundai.

They achieved that with a low nose, active air flaps at the front, wheel gap reducers, and slim digital side mirrors in markets that are cool enough to allow that. The rear features an elliptical spoiler, slight boat-tail structure, and separation traps on both sides of the rear bumper. Meanwhile, a fully covered undercarriage, reduced wheel-arch gap, and optimized deflectors create a floor that’s just as slick as the surface. They’re also big on Parametric Pixels because there are over 700 of them on the surface for the headlamps, rear combination lamps, front lower sensors, air vent garnishes, and elsewhere.

The cabin is defined by a cocoon-shaped layout filled with sustainable, eco-friendly materials and a bunch of lights and stuff. AS modular touchscreen dashboard features a 12″ infotainment display plus another 12″ screen for the gauge cluster. Dual Color Ambient Lighting provides a spectrum of 64 colors and six dual color themes. The eco-friendly materials used depend on the trim level, but that can include recycled pigment paint from end-of-life tires, eco-process leather, recycled PET fabric, bio TPO skin, paint derived from vegetable oils, and recycled fish net carpet.

They say we’ll know more sometime later this month, including full specs, features, and the tech on board. You have our attention, Hyundai.

[Source: Hyundai]

Acura TLX Type S PMC Edition

Acura is offering up a special version of the TLX Type S that’s inspired by the most recent NSX. Handcrafted in Acura’s Performance Manufacturing Center, it’s a TLX Type S offered in NSX colors with unique wheels and some bespoke exterior and interior finishes.

Just in time for the 4th of July weekend, the three colors available on the TLX Type S PMC Edition are pulled straight from the NSX. They are Curva Red, 130R White, and Long Beach Blue. Each is painted in premium “nano-pigment” paints and features contrasting Berlina Black paint for the roof, antenna, and door handles. The car rides on NSX-inspired Y-spoke 20″ wheels painted in a copper finish, a first for an Acura model. Exterior enhancements are capped off with a carbon fiber decklid lip spoiler, carbon rear diffuser, lower side sill garnish, gloss-black badging, and black-chrome quad exhaust finishers.

The cabin gets carbon fiber trim panels, illuminated door sills, and “premium” floor mats. The color scheme inside depends on the paint – Curva Red is paired with Ebony with red contrast stitching, Long Beach Blue uses Orchid with blue stitching, and 130R features what else but a red interior. Milano leather seats with Ultrasuede inserts are standard.

The TLX Type S PMC Edition then gets the same quality control process as the NSX. That includes a dyno check, paint inspection, and rough-road simulation. Shipment is done in an enclosed single car carrier with a specially designed car cover to protect the paint. Pricing is anyone’s guess.

[Source: Acura]

Ford F-150 Heritage Edition

For the 2023 model year, Ford is celebrating a major milestone for what is probably the single most successful automotive line in history – the Ford F-Series. Its 75th anniversary is being marked with a Heritage Edition F-150 for this model year only.

It’s just a two-tone paint job. And it’s not even the sort of two-tone design that you’d think associate with an old truck. They say it’s a “modern take on the timeless 70s and 80s” designs. If by “modern take” they mean something far different, sure. It’s only available on XLT trucks and also adds distinct seat trim covers and logos. Five color options are available – Race Red, Atlas Blue, Antimatter Blue, Avalanche, and Area 51 – and the accent color varies between Carbonized Gray and Agate Black.

This will probably be a fairly cheap option, or at least it should be. Regardless, dealers will still ask $90,000 for them because they’re dicks. Maybe it’ll be worth something 25 years from now on Bring a Trailer. I like Ford, obviously. I own two of them. But this is kind of a miss.

[Source: Ford]

Red Bull confirms hypercar development

Knowing what Red Bull and specifically their Chief Technical Officer, Adrian Newey, is capable of, I’m not even sure calling this a hypercar is doing it justice. Red Bull Advanced Technologies has announced the RB17, a two-seat hypersupermegacar designed, developed, and manufactured entirely in-house. Nearly.

Certain things like the engine, a V8 hybrid unit developing over 1,100 horsepower, is being constructed by a third party. Probably Porsche if I had to guess, seeing as how a Red Bull Porsche collaboration is F1’s worst-kept secret. But every other major component is all done by the geniuses behind one of F1’s most successful teams and last year’s champion. Other details that they’ve mentioned include a carbon-composite tub and the most advanced ground effect package available in a series production car. And it will be a production car. Maybe not entirely road legal, but it would never be driven on the street anyway. 50 of these are confirmed for production at £5M each with production taking place at their Milton Keynes campus.

Adrian Newey commented: “The RB17 distills everything we know about creating championship-winning Formula One cars into a package that delivers extreme levels of performance in a two-seat track car. Driven by our passion for performance at every level, the RB17 pushes design and technical boundaries far beyond what has been previously available to enthusiasts and collectors.”

Christian Horner, CEO of Oracle Red Bull Racing and Red Bull Advanced Technologies, echoed that sentiment. I only mention him so the rabid F1 community on Twitter find this article and give us a numbers boost.

Anything Andrian Newey is involved in turns into a masterpiece. There’s nobody else in the industry like him. If he’s given the resources and the opportunity he’ll create something out of this world. So we’ll be following this RB17 project closely.

[Source: Red Bull Advanced Technologies]

What’s your automotive news?

hooniverse news whats your naws

That’s all I’ve got for you this week, so now it’s your turn. If you saw anything, fixed something, broke everything, or otherwise did anything even remotely car related that you want to share with your fellow hoon, sound off in the comments.

Have a good weekend.

I'm the guy that spoiled the site with all the new car stuff. Hooniverse News Editor since 2011, amateur motorsport photographer, sim racer, and mountain road enthusiast.

20 Comments

  1. I spotted someone with Concours d’ Lemons decals on her windshield.

    “They have those around here?”, I asked.

    “Actually, these were from California,” she answered. “But if you really want fun, go to a 24 Hours of Lemons Race. We have a friend with an MG…”

    “ZOMBEE?!?!?”

    “Yes. Yes, of course. You know Pete?”, she replied.

    “Uh, nope.”

    The power of Hooniverse.

  2. This week, I was invited to be part of a focus group for the Xpeng P7. We never test drove it because it’s considerably more expensive than the only slightly smaller Tesla 3 it competes with, with a few issues like super slow quick charging (80 kW compared to Tesla’s 250 kW) and phantom breaking issues nullifying its cruise control…just like Tesla.

    We were a group of a few people and it’s funny how there was good consensus about what people wanted: Control over the car (everyone had had bad experiences with automated/”smart” systems), a good price per kWh as a standard metric, and…buttons! There was more like serviceability nearby and such, but it was surprising how similar metrics everyone agreed on, given that the group consisted of very different people driving very different cars.

  3. This past week I bought my one daughter a Nissan Kicks S. This is the “base” model that had ticked every box she wanted. Basically she wanted a newer version of her old but trusty Pontiac Vibe that took her through high school and college.( currently my daily). Dimensions are very similar to her old car and she instantly felt comfortable during her test drive. She’s done several long distance trips and is averaging a spectacular 38-40mpg.

    My Maverick order was supposed to be built in the beginning of June. It was pushed to end of June. Now no news and the order tracking website is down. To be fair, this seems to be the case for scores of other Maverick buyers who also placed deposits. Not sure if I’ll ride this out or buy something efficient to use as my commuter car in the near future.

      1. Side note,

        I would easily rock a Micra. I’ve watch the Canadian Micra series races on YouTube. It seems that Nissan really hit the mark with this car.

        1. FWIW, the Micra had just hit the market when I bought (back in 2014). I tested one, and it was a perfectly fine car, but nothing outstanding. I ended up buying a Mazda2 as it was a fair bit nicer, and effectively no more expensive (a bit higher priced, but incentives leveled out the difference). Admittedly, part of this was because wanting A/C and a manual required stepping up to the mid-tier model with the Micra (absolute base was significantly cheaper, but A/C wasn’t available without the auto).

          I also think we unfairly overlook the Mitsu Mirage – it’s absolutely an old-school tin can econo car, but such fantastic fuel economy makes it a pretty solid proposition (the Micra’s fuel economy is relatively middling, just like my 2’s).

  4. We just got back from a roadtrip to the Oregon Coast where the Mazda CX-5 hauled us through the mountains and up and down Highway 101 with its usual flawless reliability. Gas prices were terrible but still not as bad as fueling up the truck in May. One odd issue was having to hit a car wash to clean off the salt on the windows after parking at the beach.
    Other than that, putting friction modifier in the truck’s differential was the easiest job I’ve ever done on the F150, marred only by dropping a 3/8″ drive extension in the oil drain pan. Next week is busier, the Buick needs servicing as does the BMW motorcycle

    1. Where did you go on the coast? If your answer includes Gardiner, you may now have greater insight into my formative years. If your answer doesn’t include Gardiner, I understand perfectly.

      1. We were South of there, Port Orford, Gold Beach and Brookings. which was the closest I’ve been to California in 10 years :). I can get a sense of where you’re coming from, I have a friend from Grants Pass
        Minor trivia Paul Neidermeyer of Curbside Classics is has a home site on Port Orford Heads near the old lifeboat station

  5. I’ve done a few car type things recently. In the one car I had had a blown speaker and then the other day two more went one right after the other. My son had been thinking about upgrading the head unit in his car for one with bluetooth, so we placed an order for 4 speakers and a head unit for his car and got those installed in our cars. Unsurprisingly when I took mine apart I found it had non stock speakers in it already and they had cut off the factory connectors. (There is still a power wire for an amp in the trunk so I knew people had messed with the stereo in the past.)

    I finally started work on getting my other Marauder back on the road. It needed a fuel pump for one, actually the most recent problem with it, I first replaced just the pump and it was unsuccessful. I could hear it run but it wouldn’t build pressure. Since it is a returnless system It has a pressure relief valve and I think somehow mine got stuck open. So I said screw it and ordered the entire assembly. Currently debating what to do for the brakes. I’ve put Power Stop products on the trucks and SUVs and have been happy with them. It needs new calipers too and they have a pretty good price for an all in one kit. The calipers are powder coated, the only problem is that they are red and they no longer seem to offer them in black. I can get black coated ones from Napa and pad/rotor kits but that will be more expensive. Once those come in I’ll tackle the reason it has been off the road for so long, the rear axle shafts and bearings. Mine was built during the time when a lot of the axle shafts were not properly hardened. I’ve got the factory Ford kit and have had it for quite a while. To give me a reason to get moving on it I already renewed the tabs.

  6. I replaced the Variomatic primary pulley diaphragms and the drive belts in my Volvo 66 GL. Next up is troubleshooting the tach in my SAAB 96. In other words, so far a fairly normal three-day weekend. I should probably also mow the lawn.

  7. My youngest wrecked her Protege. Rear ended an SUV and submarined under the bumper, catching the core support on the trailer hitch. Wrinkled hood and all, but surprisingly no leaks and it drove home fine.

    I spent the weekend pulling off the damaged parts and ordering replacements for mechanical bits (radiator, AC condenser, headlight). Spent this morning at the Pick N Pull getting a new hood, bumper and core support. This afternoon I started cutting out the old bent core support. Parts hopefully arrive the end of the week, but they’re promised by Monday. I’m hoping to get it back together next weekend.

    I got a price from a local shop for replacing the broken leaf spring on the Tundra. $900. For one side. I can get the parts for both sides for $400 or so. Looks like I’m going to DIY that too. I’ve got too many projects on my plate, I was hoping to outsource that one, but there’s no way I’m spending $1,800.

    1. this is what happens every time i think i’m gonna outsource a job. so far it’s only ever been worth farming out fluid and oil changes for me, as well as stuff that isn’t just straight swapping of hard parts (roll bar install and soft top swap on my miata). if it’s suspension or engine work, it’s gonna cost a grand just to have them get in there. i always end up doing them in the driveway.

  8. Oh, that TLX Type S PMC edition is fantastic in that blue. Past PMC editions haven’t been a lot more money than the top spec model. If that holds true here, it’d be worth every penny.

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