Last Call: What did you think you would be driving in 2020?

Full disclosure: No one here has bought another 80-Series Land Cruiser.

I saw this on a Toyota Land Cruiser group and it made me giggle. I don’t miss my 80-Series Land Cruiser, but I’ve been browsing a bunch of 100-Series LCs.

What did you think you would be driving in 2020?

Last Call indicates the end of Hooniverse’s broadcast day. It’s meant to be an open forum for anyone and anything. Thread jacking is not only accepted, it’s encouraged.

12 Comments

  1. Something else I bought without much forward thinking. Forward thinking has never held much value for me.

  2. People are still talking about hydrogen cars as the future…which is what it always has been.

    Personally, I thought I’d be back in a Volvo. Instead, I think a V60 or V90 is incredibly sexy, but I’m not and would feel misplaced in one. Instead, I have developed an interest in the underdog; or the car that doesn’t fit.

  3. Something a bit more Syd Mead sleek and aerodynamic.

    I did not see everyone driving high riding SUVs coming at all.

    1. I think you poke the core of the issue here. It’s healthy and good to assume the future contains progress and is the result of good choices.

      Mankind’s inherent stupidity, with SUVs combining the worst of all vehicle classes as an example, keeps coming as a surprise, then.

      Of course, these cars are safe, practical and somewhat efficient (only relative to past performance), but they’re not halfway to where we could be. I figured sleek vans would be the logical alternative to what we have on our streets now.

  4. Addressing the future: Someone I know recently had their car totaled in an accident, and they’re on the hunt for a new one. Their question to me: In a private sale, when a buyer wants to negotiate taking the car to a shop for a third-party inspection, what’s the customary arrangement? All involved want to protect their interest, of course, but logistical problems and time can be an issue. What’s worked for the Hoonitariat?

    1. Auto club/automobile associations in your country/state/province might provide an in-driveway inspection at a suitable time. they obviously aren’t full teardown inspections, but enough to give you peace of mind.

      If I were the seller I would probably welcome such an inspection (at the potential buyers cost of course!). If they buy the car they’ll be satisfied they know hat the’re getting. If they don’t buy it I’ll have a better idea of the cars value and any do-it-right-now repairs/maintenance.

  5. Well, according to an essay assignment I had to complete in the 6th grade – 34 years ago (my Mother kept boxes upon boxes of my pre-collegiate education progress and prowess (or lack thereof)), my fleet would consist of a 1970 GTO Judge Ram Air IV in Orbit Orange, a 1970 Hemi Challenger R/T convertible in Top Banana with a black interior and a 1964 Ford Fairlane Thunderbolt.
    I guess I held true-to-form with my GTX

  6. I’m just hoping everyone else is driving something that is made physically incapable of hitting a motorcycle, in which case I’ll be riding something like a Triumph Street Scrambler.

  7. ” Addressing the future: Someone I know recently had their car totaled in an accident, and they’re on the hunt for a new one. Their question to me: In a private sale, when a buyer wants to negotiate taking the car to a shop for a third-party inspection, what’s the customary arrangement?

    I will start and others will give their experience, but in my world it has always been that the buyer pays for the inspection, and also chooses the mechanic to do said inspection. If no previously undisclosedproblems are found, the cost of the inspection is borne entirely by the buyer. If the mechanic finds previously undisclosed problems, there are four possible outcomes:

    1. The deal is called off by the buyer; a car with a big problem, or with too many small problems suggests poor maintenance and surprise problems down the line.

    2. The seller can have the necessary repairs made. For me, the seller saying he will fix it himself is not appealing, as he may choose to the repairs poorly. So, I wanna see receipts. Such repairs never increase the sale price of the car, or I walk away.

    3. The price is lowered by the inspecting mechanic’s educated guess as to the likely cost of the necessary repairs.

    4. The seller declines to sell figuring he will find somebody else.

    In all cases, the cost of the inspection itself comes out of the buyer’s pocket no matter what happens to the deal and regardless of who calls it off.

    No doubt I have forgotten something, but the Hive Mind here will flesh this out for you.

    1. Thanks! I always do my own inspections when buying, but then I usually go for old cars and take my chances (my daily driver will turn 40 next year!). This would be for something much newer. While I could spot obvious problems, I wouldn’t want to make the call without a lift or proper diagnostic tools, especially with $$$ involved.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

The maximum upload file size: 64 MB. You can upload: image, audio, video. Links to YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and other services inserted in the comment text will be automatically embedded. Drop files here