Is this the only way I’ll be able to afford a vintage Ford Mustang?

The idea of swapping the Jaguar out for something cool and older is playing on a constant loop in my head. And one of the vehicles that pop up most frequently is an old Ford Mustang. I’ve always been a Ford fan. The Mustang is an icon. And for quite a long time, older Mustangs in mediocre state were pretty darn cheap. Sure, the fastbacks and desirable models always commanded a bit more dough, but you could snatch up a coupe for short money. Those days are clearly gone.

See that car posted above? It’s from this Craigslist ad. In it, the seller explains that it’s a non-op car with a clean title. The factory-fitted 289 and four-speed stick are in place. But there’s a whole lot missing. I only see quarter windows for the glass, the interior is comprised of a steering wheel and a rear seat, and we’ve got no lights or grille. The asking price for this very-much a project car is $7,300.

This is the best price I’ve seen on an old Mustang in the last year and a half. And that’s because this car vaguely resembles a Mustang that once enjoyed running, driving, seats, and facial protection in the form of a windshield. Even if you could haggle this car down to an even $5,000, it’s still more than it should be. The motor isn’t special. Nor is the body-style. And there’s nothing specific about the year that’s exciting either. But it is an old Mustang, and that’s all that matters for the market right now.

Is this the only way I’ll be able to afford one of these things? Should I set my sights elsewhere on less desirable old iron? What would you go for right now if you wanted to get into something from the mid to late 60s with V8 power?

16 Comments

  1. A ’65 Mustang with a 289 and a four-speed was my daily driver for a couple of years in college, which was long enough ago that prices were modest. It was fun and all but I can’t see paying a staggeringly high premium for the experience (also true of the Mustang).

    “…if you wanted to get into something from the mid to late 60s with V8 power?”

    I’d wait until I had calmed back down, then go for something sensible instead like a Panhard PL 17.

  2. Used to be that pickups were the cheap ticket to ’60s vibes. But, now they’ve reached ridiculous prices too, so maybe the next big thing will be HD trucks? I’m sure you can find a nice C60 or Ford F600 or maybe even a Dodge D500. You’d check all the boxes – 2 door, a V8 (and most likely a big-block!) and a manual transmission.

    1. Mrs. Jeff made him sell the F100 because it’s “unsafe”. I can’t imagine she would let him get another truck of the same vintage that takes up two (or 4) parking spaces and is too tall to fit in any garage.

      But maybe an Imperial? Banned from demolition derbies because they are too indestructible–the other driver’s car is your crumple zone. It will certainly have 8 cylinders, and there is good support for RB engines, even if you do have to deal with the Mopar tax.

      Otherwise, for 60’s iron, I think a Buick or Mercury probably gets you more car for less money than a Mustang.

      1. Nah I sold it because I couldn’t put my daughter in it, and I bought the Benz. Wifey didn’t force any moves with that one.

        An Imperial would be the shit…

        1. Ah. I thought she was the one who said you couldn’t put your daughter in it, but I see now that your actual words were:

          “The truck is barely safe enough for adults so I’m going to listen to the advice of my wife and go a different route.”

          FWIW, my dad had a Mustang like that one (except entirely functional, painted, and legal) when I was an infant, and he used to plop my baby carrier between the front seats; no straps or seat belts anywhere in sight. A little later, he swapped the notchback for a fastback, and during a cross-country trip, I taught myself how to stand by pulling myself up in the back seat while we zipped down the highway. So if you do come up with the funds to buy a vintage Stang, note that it has already received the OA5599 safety seal of approval.

  3. A Mustang II is vintage. A Mustang II could be had with a V8. A Mustang II is not that expensive. Also, honestly, kind of goofy rad if built up enough.

    You know what you have to do.

      1. Could be worse, I was ready to suggest SN95 Mustangs (which don’t seem to have been helped out by rising Fox Mustang values just yet).

  4. Rambler Americans are still cheap, super easy to wrench, came stock with a V8, were available as a drop-top and a wagon, if either of those were your thing, and are nice looking, if a bit understated.

  5. There is one station wagon for which I would sell my soul (which ain’t worth much, TBH). Fortunately, they’re very rare, so my soul won’t be on the auction block anytime soon.

    My object of lust is a 64-5 Chevelle 2-door wagon, lightly resto-moodded, with FI, overdrive (manual or automatic), disc brakes, and Vintage Air.

  6. Thanks for the information keep sharing such informative post. It is very well written, and your points are well-expressed.

  7. Driver quality 60s Thunderbirds are still pretty affordable, I think. For some reason they haven’t had the price spike almost everything else has.

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