In I thought I was slick news: Oil Extractor edition

I’ve been wanting an oil extractor. Anyone I know who has one sings its praises like nothing else. You slide the plastic tube down the dipstick channel, pump out all the oil into the container, and you’re ahead of the game. No messy oil collection trays. No fouling of drain plugs. And no laying on your back to finish the job. So I ordered one from Amazon, bought oil and a filter at O’Reilly’s, and set out to effortlessly change the oil in my wife’s 2016 Mazda CX-5.

The specific one I purchased is the EWK 6.5-liter Oil Extractor (if you buy one using that link, btw, we get some dough… just FYI). It’s a tidy and simple system that even I can’t mess up. It comes with the fluid containment vessel, three tubes, and …that’s it. There are two ways to extract the fluid. You can manually pump it out or hook up air to pull it out pneumatically. I just stuck with the manual method and it was fine, but I imagine the powered air method is pretty sweet. This version, oddly, doesn’t come with a cap to seal it up when you’re done, which is stupid. But the cap is also on Amazon, and I ordered that too.

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Oil changes just got slightly less messy…

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I pulled the CX-5 into the garage, popped the hood, pulled the dipstick, and started pumping. A few minutes later, I had sucked out all the oil. So it was time to now remove the filter. And I assumed this would be easy enough to reach… because I’m dumb. It is easy, but there’s a plastic panel that needs to be removed first. And for proper room to do this, I had to lift the nose of the car up. The plastic panel is held in place by two 8mm screws and a plastic rivet that pops right out.

So while the extractor made removing the oil a much easier cleaner affair, I still had to get down on the ground to finish the job. If you have a top-mounted filter, this would be the perfect solution. Or, like on my Montero, the filter can be accessed without lifting the truck up, that’s a bonus too. Really though, not messing with the oil pan drain plug is a bonus. If for some reason, I didn’t fully tighten it, cross-thread it, or just generally fuck something up, I would be down a vehicle. So this extractor is still extremely useful and I’ll definitely keep using it for future oil (or other fluid) changes.

Once the CX-5 was finished, I lugged the container down to that aforementioned O’Reillys which recycled the oil. It’s a far cleaner vessel than the standard oil catch trays I’ve used in the past. Next time, I’ll try hooking up an air line to see what that’s like. Either way, despite still getting under the car, I’m sold on this extractor. If you want to check one out, click that link above.

14 Comments

  1. I was never so diligent about oil changes as I was with my CJ, simply because it was quick and easy. I have ramps that I use for my cars now, which is easier than dragging out the jack and stands, but still a bit of a hassle.

    The reality is that while I love tinkering with my vehicles to make improvements, I despise maintenance.

  2. It makes a lot of sense for a boat, particularly if accessing the drain plug requires lifting the engine out of the hull.

    For a car, particularly for those of us who have to drag stuff out to the driveway to do maintenance, I would probably prefer to drain oil the old fashioned way. It gives me a chance to clean any shavings off the drain plug magnet, and it lets me work WITH gravity instead of against it to get crud out of the pan.

    But my wife’s daily has the drain plug at the back of the pan instead of the bottom, and it’s always a challenge to guess how far the oil stream is going to shoot, and then have the drain pan ready to catch it.

  3. Not for me. I would be anxious about not knowing if I got all. of. the. oil. out. I’ve been known to throw a half quart of clean cheap stuff in just to chase the outliers out of their hideouts.
    Also this is in the same category as kitchen gadgets that are nifty and rewarding that one time a year you use them and then take up space on your counter forever. Like a teardrop trailer. This thing looks to be about the size of a 30 pound fire extinguisher.
    Also $75 buys a lot of kitty litter and overalls.

    1. I agree with the sentiment, although I’m curious to learn how one can use a teardrop trailer as a kitchen gadget.

  4. I’ve been toying with the idea of getting one to do intermediate oil changes on the Touareg. 15,000km changes seems a bit far for a diesel.

  5. I bought one off Amazon to use on a boat with an inboard. It was the kind you can hook up to a drill and cost about $35.00. It lasted 1/2 of an oil change before breaking.

    1. My working hypothesis that Amazon has done for everything else what Harbor Freight has done for tools turns out to be true for tools as well.

  6. You still need ramps and a catch pan for the filter, plus this requires a trip to the parts store to empty after every change. My 16 qt. drain pan let’s me do 2-3 changes, maybe 4, depending on the vehicle, before I have to bring it in.

  7. If $80 is too much, how about $30? I bought this cheap & cheerful oil change pump on Aliexpress and it works. My Fiat Abarth makes you work for the oil changes and I’d rather not take off the big aero shield under the engine. I’m pretty sure my pump gets all the oil as it removes exactly as much as should’ve been in there.
    https://www.aliexpress.com/item/32548842274.html?spm=a2g0o.productlist.0.0.4b4b6edfrnYfNp&algo_pvid=556dad6e-c90a-4187-860e-39b43f7d0b7e&algo_expid=556dad6e-c90a-4187-860e-39b43f7d0b7e-10&btsid=0bb0622c16031189488882681e783c&ws_ab_test=searchweb0_0,searchweb201602_,searchweb201603_

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