Hooniverse Weekend Edition: Meet a customized Fiero made to look like a Contemporary Riviera; The Zimmer Quicksilver!


Happy Fathers Day, and I hope you are enjoying all the special Hooniverse Postings on the first summer weekend of 2010. Here is a car that was produced by a company known for their over the top Neo-Classic Replicars. The question I have is why did they even bother with the Quicksilver? Looking at a current Ebay Listing, I was wondering if you were thinking the same thing….


Zimmer was a very profitable company producing huge neo-classic coupes and convertible based on current production Ford and Lincoln models. In 1986, designer Don Johnson (no, not the same Don Johnson running around Miami in a Corvette Based Ferrari!) designed the Quicksilver for the company, but it never went into serious production until 1987, just in time for GM to euthanize it in 1988. Only 170 (or so) were produced, and the looks were similar to the then current Buick Riviera.

Now let’s look at the Ebay Listing for a 1987 Quicksilver Coupe, with only a little over 24,000 miles on it, and you can see the biggest problem facing companies like Zimmer; From substandard fiberglass, aftermarket wheels that don’t age well, and shoddy interior materials backed up by horrible workmanship. When producing only a few cars a month, these companies tried to shave costs, while charging customers an inflated price tag. Just take a look at the interior shots, with the “Leather” interior becoming discolored, the “Wood” trim delaminating, and the exterior components showing stress cracks.

I am surprised that the chrome brightwork is still glossy, but that may just be the pictures. Anyway, the company listing this “classic” car is based out of Los Angeles, and it didn’t do their homework as far as research. This Quicksilver is an interesting car, but is it worth almost $15,000? What you do get is a low mileage Fiero, with a decomposing interior, and some strange looks. I’m not sure that’s worth much. Take a look at the Ebay listing here!

22 Comments

  1. I almost don't dislike this car. It looks professionally styled as opposed all the other Zimmers and Zimmer-clones out there, and for the most part, the details work – even the pimp-o-Lincolnesque grille treatment. The only really ham-handed part is the heavy chrome around the taillights. $15,000+ is too much especially with a tatty interior but if the price stays near the current bid of around $6,300, it might be a decent price. Of course, it depends on the mechanicals too, and it's a shame this car wouldn't have the '88 Fiero improvements.

  2. Because I'm sure what your typical neo-classic customer is looking for is a low-slung (I think when you're driving a Fiero, your ass is actually about six inches below the pavement) sports car.

  3. Almost looks like something Bruce Wayne would drive to work (and by "work" I mean "not being Batman") every day. I wish I was joking (though a Northstar swap might make it somewhat bearable).

  4. One too many zeros on the buy it now price. I can't believe the bidding has gotten as high as it has. What a fugly POS based on a GM POS.

  5. From the outside (and a bit of distance) it doesn't look too bad, except for that ridiculous rear bumper. What the hell were they thinking? Anyway, from a distance it has kinda-Riviera, kinda-Lincoln MkIV look that could work if the insides matched the outsides. But no dice. The interior would make a Yugo blush in embarrassment. What cheap crap, sheesh. And they want 16K for this turd? They're freaking nuts.

  6. Looking at the photos, all I could think is that we need more cars with chrome steel bumpers.

  7. Not a bad design, but it is an answer to a question that no one ever asked. I think it is possible to argue that this looks better than the 1st gen Fiero, but I won’t be the one.

  8. This probably belongs in the obscure trivia thread, but I remember a Car and Driver cover story (yeah they must have been desperate for material or heavily bribed) where they mentioned the difficult of finding a stamping plant capable of making the very deep bumpers. Of course this is the only thing memorable about this Fiero pimpmobile.

  9. Take my hoon card if you must, but beside the rear end, I love this thing, tacky though she be.

  10. I've owned a Quicksilver since 1999 and could not love my Zimmer any more. So much of what was stated above is simply not true.
    The fiberglass panels are in no way substandard. The chrome bumpers were produced in Taiwan, then shipped to the good ol' U.S.of A. for a extremely high quality chrome plating. Most Quicksilver's were fitted with custom made Zimmer wire wheels that if cared for properly still look good today. Interiors were built with the finest of materials…high quality woods and butter soft Italian leather…my interior looks wonderful after enduring almost 25 years in the sun and heat of Palm Springs, CA.
    To appreciate this car you must first accept it for what it is. In the "then" world of Cadillac Cimmaron's, Ford Fairmont's, and the like, Zimmer appealed to a small niche market that was absolutely fed up with the aesthetics and quality of the auto industry at that time.
    I love the attention my car gets around town. I can't stop at an intersection without neighboring cars asking me questions…… and they all love it too!!
    Scott

  11. I drive mine once in a while.i like the attencion i get every where i go.and if it is not a nice car at least is rare and you dont see them often.feel like driving a car that no one has . I love it

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