Hooniverse Wagon Wednesday – A Low Mileage Mercury Colony Park


Welcome to another edition of Hooniverse Wagon Wednesday. The Mercury brand has left the building, but that doesn’t diminish the desire to own one for many of us. The Mercury brand really came into its own during the 60s and the 70s, with understated styling (for the time), and some great models like the original Mercury Cougar, the Grand Marquis, along with the hot Mercury Cyclone. There was another popular model that was billed as the Lincoln of Wagons, and that was the Mercury Colony Park.


This particular Colony Park is a 1969 model year, with only 22,000 miles under its belt. The blue and woodgrain finish seems flawless, and the interior is gorgeous. The seats look like they are leather rather than vinyl (the giveaway is the way the seating surfaces are creased… vinyl wouldn’t do this) and when was the last time you saw diamond stiched seats in a domestic vehicle?

Under the hood is a 429 CID monster, which produced 320 HP with a 2bbl carburetor, or 390 HP with a 4bbl carburetor. Of course, this car is listed as having every option, including the rear twin facing seats, enabling the wagon to seat up to 10 passengers in extreme discomfort. Styling touches really distinguish this from its Country Squire cousin, with the Wood Grain framed with thin bands of aluminum trim rather than fiberglass simulated ash trim, a very clean face that would be go onto becoming a Lincoln hallmark, and options that you could not purchase at your local Ford retailer.

Asking price for this Colony Park is $22,900, which I feel is very close to the top end. Wagons are only climbing in value, and this one should be trading hands at Barrett Jackson during the next decade for double this value, but what do you think? See the listing here.

0 Comments

    1. The brightly-colored naugas were hunted into extinction. The vicious crushing of velour (especially the sensitive red velour) was stopped by PETT (People for the Ethical Treatment of Textiles). All that's left is poor, thin vinyl, polyester cloth and plastic-infused split leather, all available in your favorite shade of beige, gray or black.

      1. If our environmentally catastrophic destruction of the world's unnatural resources continues, I anticipate the resurgence of the MBI* (Mexican Blanket Interior). Alff Investment Strategists have upgraded rough-hewn cotton pull overs to BUY.

        1. Wouldn't necessarily assume poseurmobile. Sometimes those involved in racing will build street vehicles that stop just short of their track cars… just because they can. This looks a bit like that.

          1. Look at the stickers in the linked pictures. Real contingency stickers would need to be placed on both sides of the car. Passenger side has one for MSD that isn't on the driver's side. That side has a Bass Pro Shops sticker that doesn't have a match.
            And if you can believe the stickers, the truck has an Erson cam and an Isky, with a Crane for good measure.
            No driver's or major sponsor's name, either. That's not a copy of anybody's real race truck.

  1. I like it. Not $$$$ like it, but I like it enough to snap some pics at car shows. The backseats are radical. Do they slide together to make a bed?!

    1. We had a 1985 Crown Vic Wagon, and those seats were only designed to fit one person on each side…. making it an 8-passenger wagon.
      The point was, I believe, so that you could sit on one side of the cushion, and have a longer cushion for thigh support, and then somewhere to put your feet. The person opposite you would sit on the other side.
      I believe that this same design was used up until the Crown Vic Wagon / Country Squire went out of production.

  2. Might I someday buy a classic car for stupidly high money just for once not to have to repair and restore everything on it myself? Sure. But when I do, I won't even look at listings that don't show me every mechanical and rust situation above and below the car in close detail.
    Also, I don't know why Jim cropped out the signs of rust at the very bottom of the b-pillar just above the rocker panel that you can see in the open door interior in the original listing. Because if I can spot that when they've only let us see some very careful photos, I bet the car looks more like $5000 from underneath.

  3. I love it, but I always thought those wheelcovers were goofy-looking. Like they designed them too small, then had to add a ring around them. It doesn't appear to have a rim-blow horn (which were a giant PITA when the rubber started to deteriorate), so it's not completely loaded. I would like to see more pictures.

    1. I'm seeing the metal semi-circle that is the "rim blow" in this era Fords. I do agree that the wheel covers look pretty goofy.

  4. These Marquis wagons are far less special than the other models – they're essentially identical with Ford wagons from the cowl and A-pillar back. They even share taillights, with the only difference being Ford having two bright ribs while the Mercury had four.

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