Hooniverse Asks: How do you really feel about the Tesla Cybertruck?

It was quickly mocked. But that’s the point of view of my own curated section of social media. I love car things, so I follow people who like similar things. Therefore, it’s likely that if I find a new vehicle to be …poorly designed (at best), then so will those I follow.

That’s not quite how the rest of the world sees things, of course.

Some are cheering on the truck from Tesla. The Cybertruck. With its movie-prop line and Bladerunner aesthetic, it’s certainly different. I’m all for different. This different doesn’t work for me. Maybe it works for you though?

How do you really feel about the Tesla Cybertruck? Sound off below!

45 Comments

  1. I honestly thought it was a joke. I can’t remember ever having such a visceral reaction to a design, which I guess is the point. Some of the renderings/press photos look decent, but out on stage…yeesh. And the side profile is just terrible. I’m all for weird designs (I like the Juke) but this is just lazy.

  2. I think it will do an excellent job of keeping TSLA share price high. It will also have strong sales with customers who already have a Tesla (and have already evolved a charger infrastructure) but who need a truck (or think they do). And it will be a favorite of gang bangers who want a relatively inexpensive bulletproof (cough) vehicle for drive-by shootings and other crimes.

    I am in none of those categories and believe the emperor has no clothes.

  3. Looks like they hit print before it finished rendering. I have heard that the sharp angular design is due to using super hard 3mm thick stainless steel body panels that can be formed on a press brake. Square trucks can be built that way and look good too. With all that glass the interior is going to be a nice solar oven. I couldn’t imagine trying to get in one after it has sat in the sun all day on a 100 degree day in August in Georgia. You could bake cookies in it.

    1. Yeah, never mind the looks, I don’t get why they’re building it out of 3mm steel? Why does it need to be bulletproof? Right when everyones realizing EVs maybe need to be lighter, Teslas going all in on MOAR is MOAR.

      Maybe he reckons Cyberpunk Electroclash Gangsta Rappers are an emerging market?

  4. Imho this whole concept of feelings for things might have peaked here. People “love” or “hate” certain cars (or Android or Apple or one particular brand of well-marketed feet-covering canvas or whatever). But it’s primarily a machine supposed to do a task.

    Maybe this is a helpful push that leads to people realizing that good design makes a thing more useful or more attractive – or both. But silly design does not much more than provoke a reaction, that fades over time. Remember Bangle-BMWs, anyone?

    Alas, trolling or real, the Cybertruck will probably become some sort of milestone in automobile history, even if its provocative powers fade eventually.

  5. Bizzaro looks aside – I cannot possibly see how they can deliver what they are claiming at the price point stated: Stainless steel panels. “bulletproof” glass. 3500lb payload, up to 14000lb towing, and a range from 250-500 miles, all for around $50k? Yeah right.

    Now onto the looks – the triangle roof looks weird, and that 2nd row must be for toddlers only, but the rest? Sheepishly, I must admit that I don’t hate it. I don’t really like it, but I don’t hate it.

    Final verdict for me = meh

    1. I have to wonder how much payload and towing affects range. Oh, you wanted to actually use it as a truck, your range is 60 miles.

  6. I’ve been ignoring it. Every news outlet and car blog I read has a headline about it, but my contrarian nature causes me to avoid anything lots of people are trying to shove in my face. My first thought was, “Oh. Tesla made a truck. Another one you can’t get a stack of plywood into. Gee it’s funny looking. Next!”

  7. Objectively, I realized a truck is actually the most likely electric vehicle I would own. I’m not going to drive it really long distances- I have my gas car (or my diesel one) for that. I own an old K10 because I live 30 miles outside of town, have a small bit of land, and need some basic hauling capability every now and then, whether bringing stuff to the house or hauling away slash/etc. So the concept of an electric truck works well for me. But I wont be buying one at $50,000 either, I’m going to stick with an old beater.

    The Cybertruck specifically- eh, props on doing something different. The last full size truck design I liked was the 99-07 Silverado. Not that I like the design of the Cybertruck either, but at least they tried something different.

  8. if it wasn’t quite so big, I’d probably have put my deposit down already. Our primary commuter has been electric for over 5 years now, two leaf leases, and most recently picked up a used Soul EV. Our last beater truck (early 90’s f150) gave up a couple years back (e4OD failure, go figure) and repair was a few times the value of the truck. If we could keep the electric commuter, but in truck form to give the occasional utility, it would be great. Unfortunately given the dimensions of cybertruck, I doubt we would be able to park it in the work garages.

    Oh, I don’t think much of the design, but for the most part I’m function > form, and if it was slightly smaller, it would tick off a LOT of functional boxes.

  9. It doesn’t bother me aesthetically, which I’ll take as the clearest indication that it’s doomed.

    From a practical standpoint, however, I wouldn’t want to be faced with the prospect of loading or unloading cargo over the sides of its bed. Besides, while I’ll admit that short, narrow pickup beds have their uses when dealing with relatively high-density cargo, such as gravel, for most purposes I’d rather have more volume available relative to the overall dimensions of the vehicle. I’m guessing they don’t intend to offer a single-cab…

  10. I was not interested in it until I saw the pictures. First I thought there was something wrong with my browser and kept waiting for the picture to finish rendering, then I realized that it actually looked like that. It makes perfect sense. We could be looking at a moment when everything that you knew about design just became obsolete, like when Ford Sierra came out.

  11. I wish someone would explain to Elon Musk that Bladerunner is not a goal for our future.

    It’s ridiculous. It’s “straight out of a sci-fi movie” in all the worst ways. It looks like what people imagined 2020 to be in 1975. (although that retro-futurism might be key to its appeal to the few who like it)

    Unfortunately, we live in a time when “too ridiculous to actually happen” might actually happen. I have no issue with an electric pickup truck. It’s not the best segment for an electric vehicle, but there is room for one. That there are “orders” for this particular electric pickup is a damning commentary on the cult of Musk.

    1. Didn’t you know that copying 35 year old designs is “futuristic”? New ideas are BORING, just copy what other people did decades ago, that’s how you innovate and show how creative you are.

  12. It’s terrible. I hate that it’s ugly and that it is being sold as if it’s done and as if the specs and prices are accurate 2 years out from production. I hate that it’s essentially a fundraiser and stock manipulation tool.

    But mostly the industrial designer in me hates that the aesthetic is being driven by a specification of dubious value. The 30X stainless steel (whatever that means) can’t be stamped and must be scored before it’s folded, according to Elon. That’s why it it looks like it was designed by team who had never seen a French curve. Because Elon wanted to use this particular grade of stainless steel (because rockets!) it will likely be more expensive to make, it looks silly, the skin will be hard to care for, it won’t be available in colors, it will be expensive to repair and may be a weapon to other vehicles in a crash. All for a bullet proof skin that no one asked for. Stupid and arrogant.

    1. I haven’t read anything ‘proper’ about it but have seen a reference to the external sheetmetal being structural thus justifying the 3mm thickness (I don’t think a lot of people realise how much thicker this is than normal). Apart from being dangerous to other vehicles or pedestrians, I dare say Elon hasn’t learned from the lessons of the step-down Hudson.

      1. Yeah, I learned that it was 3mm thick after I wrote this. I think that’s close to 3 times the typical automotive body sheet metal thickness.

        Much of the fixed external sheet metal on unit body cars is already structural. Certainly the roof and rear quarter panels are. The front fenders are typically bolt on and may be aluminum or plastic and don’t provide a lot of structure.

        I’m afraid that I don’t understand the Hudson reference, would you explain?

        1. Because the Hudson was a unit body when they weren’t as familiar as nowadays, they weren’t prepared for the task of re-engineering the sheetmetal as well as restyling it so they were hamstrung when it came time to update the car, which cost them in staying competitive.

          My impression is the front sheetmetal must be structural here to justify being 3mm thick.

          1. Maybe they could hot stamp for the facelift? That would be nice and cheap! (or maybe the real world will intrude…)

    2. And that grade of stainless (301) isn’t even corrosion resistant enough for coastal salty air, people who now about materials are saying in the ‘net.
      Something like 316L could be suitable but it’s 3x or something more expensive…..

      1. I never found a reference to a specific grade other than what Tesla said – 30X. I suppose the X might be a variable so it could be 301 or 304. 304 is more common and has good corrosion resistance, 304L even better.

  13. Like any Tesla product, I’m positive enough, but waiting for the asterisk. You know, it drives great* (*but the interior is garbage), it’s $39,995* (*for a model that will basically never be available for order and you’ll want to add $10k in options before taking delivery), or the range is spectacular” (*but the chassis might crack after gentle usage).

    I like that it’s weird looking (although I’m sure there’s compromises brought on by that), the specs are good, but it’s bigger than something I’d buy, and it’s still too concept car for me to have strong feelings towards it.

  14. It’s the death of design. The trend toward angry, overly aggressive, penis-measuring vehicles has come to it’s logical conclusion and now elegance and subtlety is dead.

  15. As I am not in the target market for this truck, I am indifferent to its design, function or cost. However, if in the unlikely occurrence this olelongrooffan would purchase one, it damn sure would have to be a manual.

  16. When Tesla unveiled its new pickup truck last Wednesday, critics blasted it as ugly and impractical. Despite those criticisms, more than 200,000 people plunked down a $100 deposit to reserve a spot in line for the new vehicle.

    The stripped-down model starts at $39,000 with a range of 250 miles while the high-end model has a range of 500 miles. The $69,000 Cybertruck boasts three motors and can go from 0 to 60 in 2.9 seconds.

    Those folks, bless their hearts, think having a Cybertruck sitting in their driveway makes them cool. They’ll still have to sit in traffic, deal with road rage and buy a new set of tires every so often.

  17. wow am i the only one who doesn’t completely despise this? i also was waiting for them to bring out the real one during the unveil, and the windows shattering was a disaster, but i happen to work right next to the site where the reveal was held and saw it in person that night. I think the profile view is pretty rough but in person……i see what they’re getting at. not sure I like it but I don’t think I hate it either.

    i don’t own a pickup and will never do pickup things so i can’t comment on it’s practicality. but as has been noted ad nauseam, most people with pickups spend most of their wheel time doing not pickup things. so why worry about it? it’s kinda cool and has lots of neat features. that’s as good a reason as most people have for buying anything besides a Corolla.

    1. No, not at all. I think it’s silly, but also a milestone. If they actually make it, I might even respect it, but – for now – I am still in the this-is-a-practical-joke-camp.

      1. I, on the other hand, completely despise it. I despise poseur, impractical uses of resources, which is what this is.

          1. Let me introduce you to the idea of a ‘work truck’. People make their living with them.

          2. I’m just saying what’s wrong with pretension? if you adopt a strictly utilitarian approach to cars you end up with everything being a 2.0 turbo four banger midsize crossover or a short cab pickup with vinyl seats and no CD player. sports cars are poseur impractical uses of resources. so are sport sedans, sport bikes, race cars, convertibles, etc. i appreciate that people don’t like the Tesla truck but there are so many better reasons than it being pretentious to not like it.

          3. If you need me to answer the question, ‘Whats wrong with pretension?’ for you, then I think we’re done here.

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