Hooniverse Asks: Do You Have a Bug-Out Bag in Your Car?


Here in earthquake country, we’re all instructed from an early age to be prepared for unexpected homelessness. That compels many of us to keep certain necessities—extra shoes, water, blankets, cocktail shakers, etc—in our cars. 
I just so happen to be acquainted with a few individuals who keep a bag in their trunk, not in case of natural disaster, but in the event that going home to an enraged significant other becomes an untenable option. In their cases, a motel emergency kit containing a toothbrush, set of clean clothes, and maybe an FTD discount card serves a similar purpose.
Our cars do serve the function of being a home away from home, and hence many of us might just keep it stocked with certain necessities of life. Do you do that, and if so, what’s in your bug-out bag?
Image: Thanks Mail Carrier

10 Comments

  1. Tools. The number and assortment varies by vehicle based on known needs and weaknesses.

  2. Here in avalanche country, having a spade, blanket and warm clothes in the car used to be a necessity. Since my current van doesn’t have the “underfloor storage” of earlier cars, I drive unprepared though. Doesn’t really need tools either, since it’s a stereotype Honda.
    https://s14.postimg.org/7a76032sh/P1110181.jpg

  3. I generally put a case of bottled water in the car, drink it at assorted outdoor/remote functions, and replenish when I get to six bottles. Also, a blanket, which has been used for sleeping purposes, but more often to conceal cargo from curious eyes, and a first aid kit for minor emergencies. I like to have a basic set of hand tools, but that’s ranged from a 12 drawer Craftsman top chest all the way down to a Leatherman and a screwdriver.

  4. I do sort of in my truck, but not in the car. For my truck, I dug an ancient hard sided suitcase of my dad’s out of the attic, stripped out the funky smelling and frayed lining and proceeded to fill it with tools, tow straps, tie down straps, folding shovel, jumper cables, etc. I try to keep a bottle of water in there too. I have a 5 year old, so I could probably find enough petrified McNuggets and fries under the seats to keep me alive for a few days.

  5. yes a ammo can full of an assortment of tools and a north face backpack full of camping supplies and a few days worth of canned food and a gallon of water

  6. Bullets, Booze and Booby magazines in the Burb.
    In all seriousness. A bag with a proper first aid kit. Some basic tools. Cash is keep in a lock box in the center counsel. Always have a long gun in the truck and there are a couple hunting knives with all the hunting gear. Blankets. Shovel. Log chain. There is a cheap winch in there also. I usually have a few changes of clothes just because. But I live close enough to work and play that I can get to home pretty quick to add anything else.

    1. Isn’t a first aid kit mandatory anyway? Sounds like you’re ready for the zombie apocalypse.

      1. I have first aid kit tent axe spare ammo and mag for my carry gun survival food water filter jumper cables and a small floor jack space blanket along with sleeping pad just didn’t want to come off as çrazy

  7. pickup truck has room for a weeks worth of loot which life in Montana and Colorado has taught me is the minimum. trauma kit, level 2, hand axe, two knives, short spade, ammo(various) &clips in sealed and bolted cans, 500ft 550 para cord, tarp, hand tools, electrical meter and supplies, air and oil filter, tow strap, 50′ decent sized chain, ground stakes, vac pac sleeping bag-blankets are ok but sometimes the cold at altitude is a bitch, snickers bars and other food, lots of matches, epoxy putty for rock holes, metal snow/ice melting pan, ziplocs, several pair of socks, boots, wool pant and shirt, tooth brush, soap and a towel..
    always carry, sometimes heavy when going into someone else’s (mountain lion, bear) dinner plate.
    if having to walk out, then water, food, axe, knife, EBPR, matches, whatever else that is not to heavy in a sling bag.
    never did need too many hand tools as it is better to be cautious and remember that if you screw up and break it or go sliding down the mountain you will be walking out from there.
    many an “adventurist” in Montana has become a meat popsicle in the winter. saviors are far between out there.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

The maximum upload file size: 64 MB. You can upload: image, audio, video. Links to YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and other services inserted in the comment text will be automatically embedded. Drop files here