A Faded Patina of Intrigue

You can win the battles and wear the medals but still lose the war.

Few tragedies are as poignant as those of storied lives meeting undignified ends.  Such appears to be the case with this poor panzer veteran serving time with younger relatives on an ignoble car lot in Allentown, PA.    You may recall this location as the site of our FC-150.   Like that monument to four-wheeled awesome, this car deserves rescue and accolade but before that can happen, let’s take a moment for quiet reflection and study, because it’s far too dignified to beg for attention.
We here at Hooniverse all seem to have an unintentional affection for Stuttgart tanks, and there are arguably few of them more deserving than this:  a classic Fintail of timeless elegance even when left abandoned.   But this particular example – forlorn though it may be – exhibits multiple layers of historic identity crises at play, and the stripped model badge on the trunk is only the tip of the iceberg.

So the Germans didn't like our fins? I say give 'em HECK! No, wait…

The “Fintail” Benz signified the W111 platform from 1959 to 1968, and was the lauded forebearer of the subsequently designated Mercedes S-class.   The fintails were somewhat controversial; supposedly created to add a belatedly understated appeal toward American tastes of the time, the cars were not actually made available west of the Atlantic until 1960 and when they were, they were only available at your friendly local Studebaker dealer.   Tellingly, the W111 Cabriolet and Coupe were not graced with the Heckflosse treatment. Still, the Mercedes 220, 230, 250, and 280 sedans and wagons sported their flosse with pride for a decade (to heck with… um, linguistic pun fail?).
Wikipedia and other Heckflosse sites state that the cars bound for the United States recieved unique, stacked headlights to conform to US DOT regulation; photos reveal that European fintails sported flush, one-piece headlight covers, and also lack the inboard parking indicator projectiles.   So then it appears we do have a US-spec car.   But which year and model?   Allegedly we may peg this as an early (1960) 220-S due to the rare chrome strip on the sides – a briefly used, US-specific cue that was quickly dropped and used nowhere else.   Apparently Germans like excess chrome even less than tail fins.  But they gave us oompa music, go figure.
So if this is a car built to US-spec for export and sale over here, then what of all the weatherbeaten medals of European heritage and origin on the grille?   Did this car travel back across the pond and rack up serious time and meritorious service, before a discharge back to the ignobility of an American convalescent lot? I’m hoping our more well-versed and well-traveled readers can help out here.
The 200,000KM medal is of obvious origin and purpose; before you snicker about it, recall that 124K miles was (and still is) a pretty big deal for a gasser of 1960’s vintage.  Several automakers offered such commemorative trinkets before the Japanese made such accomplishments merely required, boring and mundane.
But what of all the others?  It appears this car is decorated with the medallions and honorifics of a veritable smorgasboard of european car organizations.    When you join the AAA in America, you get a cheesy sticker which, if applied, magically transforms your car into a promotion for the AARP as well.   But these are actually medals, to be installed and worn with pride.   Were these from clubs that had US chapters, or did a car have to be registered locally to their respective HQs to earn respect and notoriety?     And what are those clubs for, in the first place?
Working roughly clockwise from the top, I’ve only been able to identify a handful of them, and so far it’s not clarifying this car’s history too much.
What do they all mean, on a car built for US sale?

The “TCS” badge with the Swiss crest was easy.   The Touring Club Suisse still has a website (not that I can read it), but its name lends a general enough description to its purpose.   According to Wikipedia (which might be taken with a grain of salt where Euro-to-‘Merican translations are concerned), its primary function is to “serve stranded motorists”.  Which would make them a Swiss AAA.  That’s OK by me, as long as they still use those St. Bernards with the whiskey barrels when you really get crossed up.
From northern Europe we move southwest to the north Atlantic coast of Spain and the small province of Guipuzcoa.  This is the smallest province of Spain, and noted for its rugged, mountainous geography.  The “Real Automovilklub de Guipuzcoa” has proved more esoteric in Google, but a few interesting tidbits have turned up.  The Automovilklub seems to have disappeared, but an outfit called the Real Motoclub de Guipuzcoa has survived since 1913 with a focus on motorcycles.   But would you believe I found an auction site selling the same medal that our mystery veteran wears?  Yours for 80 Euros.    (I can’t help wondering about the emphasis on the word “real”; Filmation wasn’t building cars in Spain, were they?)
I can’t identify the faded medal on the bottom right.   It looks like it may say “Espana” and the remnants of a central yellow band would correlate to that, but I can’t find any active Spanish clubs using similar insignia. (That’s not to say they don’t exist; just that my espanol needs work).  The primary auto club in Spain is RACE – the Royal Automovil Club de Espana – and is another general-interest, AAA-like organization.   Their logo is quite a bit different however.
The medal on the bottom left is potentially interesting and rare.   It’s virtually illegible in the photo, but by pure dumb luck I found a site selling knock-offs of the medals used by the Automobile Club de France.   The knock-offs are slightly different, while the one on our Fintail is of legitimately aged pedigree – and given its deep 3-D relief, was probably expensive to make.   So why is that interesting?   It seems the ACF began not as a “AAA” type organization, but was founded in the late 19th century as an exclusive gentleman’s fraternity of the highest order.  With a legacy including ownership of historic castles and villas, and membership ranks of famous and eminent names, the ACF was not originally intended to be your french granny’s tow-truck broker.   Oh, but they did pause from sniffing wine, defeating womens’ suffrage, and stuffing tasty baguettes long enough to organize and found a little race called The 24 Hours of LeMans.  Oui! But even if today’s ACF has evolved to serve a broader, more watered-down clientele, was this the case 50 years ago?  A century ago they may as well have been Free Masons.   Even today, they maintain several exclusive clubs and properties.  Not a mime-striped AAA, that much is for certain.
Sadly, the next (upper) two on the left side are a complete mystery.   They’re just as illegibly faded as the ACF’s below, but dumb luck has not come to my rescue this time.  Oh well, win some lose some…  Who will step up to the plate? (Click the pic for a larger version…!)
Moving across to our final two in the center then…

Few things say “Norway” like “Kongelig Norsk Automobilklub“, and indeed, I found this club still active with its own website.   Once again, my mono-linguistics fail me, but their apparent association with FiA (F1 and/or WRC anyone?) seems intriguing.  Is it yet another general-interest AAA-type organization, or one with more noble and exclusive goals, like the ACF?
Finally, we get to what may be the most intriguing medal on the car.   The “AIT” logo is still in use, unchanged, representing the Alliance Internationale de Tourisme.   Now this is where it gets interesting.   The AIT is more of an international aggregate corporation that serves to “represent the interests of national automobile associations and touring clubs”.   This includes each of the aforementioned European entities, the American AAA, and clubs throughout Asia, South America, and elsewhere.   As such, AIT doesn’t solicit or endorse membership by individuals; people don’t join the AIT, auto clubs (and/or their combined management) do, to further their collective interests on a geopolitical scale.    So it seems odd that an individual could obtain a badge from the AIT for an individual car.    What would such a person be promoting?   Why would the AIT seek to recognize such a person or vehicle?  What prestige would adorning one’s car with figurehead initials afford?
And thus having concluded our brief tour of Europe, let us return to the car as it sits for just a moment.   It has just a hair under a truly period-amazing 175,000 miles on the odometer – or 280,000 kilometers.   That could have earned it a new-era 250,000 km medal, and is close to a possible 300,000 km one.   The car was driven and cared for long enough to be retrofitted with an aftermarket CHMSL light in the back window.   Now it’s easy to see this as a disgrace, but to put forth the effort at the time meant that you were of no small means or care when it came to keeping distracted teenagers from ramming your heck.    Finally, someone went through the trouble to remove the model number from the trunk… yet left the rare chrome side trim, and Flava-Flav hood ornament, intact!  Kind of an odd trophy to pilfer from a vet, don’t you think?
Yes, this car has an interesting history.  Or so it would seem, if only we knew the truth.
So, what say you, esteemed readers, historians, jokers, and hoons?   Did this car earn a reputation as a back-forth globetrotter of high pedigree?   Or was it merely the conveyance of an owner with an eclectic taste for secondary honorifics?    What are the three I couldn’t identify?  Does the AIT badge mean anything, was the ACF medal from its secret society days, or would you yourself just try to “collect ’em all”, no matter the cost to pocketbook and dignity?
No matter the story, it’s an interesting find on the backlot of a shady dealer.    Fare thee well, our elegant friend, on the visions of a road well traveled.

They say all good things must come to an end, and thus we have this poor veteran doing time on an ignoble car lot in Allentown, PA.    You might recall this location as the site of my FC-150.   Like that monument to four-wheeled awesome, this car deserves rescue and appreciation but before that can happen, let’s take a moment and study it a bit because it’s too dignified to beg.
For starters, we here at Hooniverse seem to have an unintentional affection for old panzer-benzes, and this would most definitely deserve it:  a classic Fintail of timeless elegance and beauty, even when left abandoned.   Yet there’s something of an identity crisis of history at play here, and the stripped model badge on the trunk is only the tip of the iceberg.
The Fintail Benz signified the W111 platform from 1959 to 1968, and was the lauded forebearer of the subsequently designated Mercedes S-class.   The fintails were somewhat controversial; supposedly added to lend belatedly understated appeal toward American sensibilities of the time, the cars were not actually made available on the west side of the Atlantic until 1960.  Additionally, the W111 Cabriolet and coupe were not graced with the Heckflosse treatment.
Wikipedia and few other aggregate sites state the the cars that were bound for the United States recieved unique, stacked headlights to conform to US DOT regulation; european fintails sport flush, one-piece headlight covers, and also lack the inboard projectile parking indicators.   So it appears we do have a US-spec car.   Even more tellingly, we can allegedly peg this as an early (1960) 220-S due to the chrome strip on the sides – a briefly used, US-specific cue.
So if this us a car built to US-spec for export and sale over here, then what of all the weatherbeaten medals of European heritage and origin on the grille?   Did this car travel back across the pond and rack up serious time and meritorious service, before a discharge back to the ignobility of the Allentown convalescent lot? I’m hoping the more well-versed and well-traveled of our readership can help out here.
The 200,000KM medal is of obvious origin and purpose; before you snicker about it, recall that 124K miles was (and still is) a pretty big deal for a gasser of 1960’s vintage.  Several automakers used to offer such trinkets before the Japanese made such acheivments boring and mundane.
But what of all the others?  It appears this car is decorated with medallions and honorifics from a veritable smorgasboard of european car clubs.    Were these from clubs that had US chapters, or did a car have to be registered locally to their respective HQs to earn respect and notoriety?   And what are they, in the first place?
Working roughly clockwise from the top, I’ve only been able to identify a handful of them, and so far it’s not clarifying this car’s history.
The “TCS” badge with the Swiss crest was easy.   The Touring Club Suisse <a href=”http://www.tcs.ch/main/fr/home.html”>still has a website (not that I can read it)…</a> but its name lends a general enough description to its purpose.   According to Wikipedia (which might be taken with a grain of salt where Euro-to-‘Merican translations are concerned), its primary function is to “serve stranded motorists”.  Which would make them a Swiss AAA.
From northern Europe we move southwest to the Atlantic coast of Spain and the small province of Guipuzcoa.  This is the smallest province of Spain, and noted for its rugged, mountainous geography.  The “Real Automovilklub de Guipuzcoa” has proved more esoteric in Google, but a few interesting tidbits have turned up.  The Automovilklub seems to have disappeared, but an outfit called the Real Motoclub de Guipuzcoa has survived since 1913 with a focus on motorcycles.   But would you believe I found an auction site selling the same medal that our mystery veteran wears?  Yours for 80 Euros.    (I can’t help wondering about the emphasis on the word “real”; Filmation wasn’t building cars in Spain, were they?)
I can’t identify the faded medal on the bottom right.   It looks like it may say “Espana” and the remnants of the yellow middle band would correlate to that, but I can’t find any active Spanish clubs using similar insignia.  The primary auto club in Spain is <a href=”http://www.race.es/”>RACE</a> – the Royal Automovil Club de Espana – and is another general-interest, AAA-like organization.   Their logo is quite different however.
The badge on the bottom left is potentially interesting and rare.   It’s virtually illegible in the photo, but by pure dumb luck I found a site selling knock-offs of the Automobile Club de France‘s medallions.   The knock-offs are slightly different, while the one on our Fintail is of legitimately aged pedigree.   So why is that interesting?   It seems the <a href=”http://www.automobileclubdefrance.fr/”>ACF</a> began not as a “AAA” type organization, but as more of an exclusive gentleman’s club of the highest order.  With a legacy of ownership stakes in castles and villas, and membership ranks of famous and eminent names, the ACF was not originally founded to be your french granny’s tow truck broker.   Oh, but they did pause from sniffing brandy, defeating womens’ suffrage, and ______ long enough to found The 24 Hours of LeMans.    Even if today’s ACF has evolved to serve a broader, more watered-down clientele, was this the case 50 years ago?  A century ago they may as well have been Free Masons.   Even today, they maintain several exclusive clubs and properties.
Sadly, the next two on the left side are a complete mystery.   They’re just as illegibly faded as the ACF’s below, but dumb luck did not come to my rescue this time.   Who will step up to the plate?  Moving across to our final two in the center then…
Few things say “Norway” like “Kongelig Norsk Automobilklub“, and indeed, I found this club <a href=”http://www.kna.no/”>still active with its own website</a>.   Once again, my mono-linguistics fail me, but their association with FiA seems intriguing.  Is it yet another general-interest AAA-type organization, or one with more noble and exclusive goals, like the ACF?
Finally, we get to what may be the most interesting one on the car.   The “AIT” logo is still in use, representing the <a http://www.aitgva.ch/AIT_Site/Public/AreasOfActivity/Motoring.htm”>Alliance Internationale de Tourisme</a>.   Now this is where it gets interesting.   The AIT is more of an international aggregate corporation that serves to “represent the interests of national automobile associations and touring clubs”.   This includes each of the aforementioned European entities, the American AAA, and clubs throughout Asia, South America, and elsewhere.   As such, AIT doesn’t solicit or endorse membership by individuals.   People don’t join the AIT, auto clubs (and/or their combined management) do, to further their collective interests on a geopolitical scale.    So it seems odd that an individual could obtain a badge from the AIT for an individual car.    What would such a person be promoting?   Why would the AIT seek to recognize such a person or vehicle?  What prestige would adorning one’s car with figurehead initials afford?
So, what say you, esteemed readers, historians, jokers, and hoons?   Did this car earn a reputation as a globetrotter of high pedigree?   Or was it merely the conveyance of an owner with an eclectic taste for secondary honorifics?    Does the AIT badge mean anything, was the ACF medal from a secret society, or would you yourself just try to “collect ’em all” whatever the cost to pocketbook and dignity?

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  1. P161911 Avatar

    US Spec car touring Europe in the 1960s would seem to indicate military service. Spain would lean towards Air Force as there was a US Airbase there. Other than that, I got nothin'

  2. dmilligan Avatar

    I worked at a Mercedes- Benz dealership for 12 years in the parts dept. and every time one of these old 111's would roll in we'd all cringe. Invariably, the owner had picked it cheap from a private party and was going to restore it, and had no idea what it was going to cost to do so. Parts for these beasts are expensive, when you could find them – a tail light lens sold for around $180 back in the '80s and many parts weren't available even from Germany. The owners figured they were going to restore it uber cheap, and were shocked and angry when they discovered that it wasn't going to work that way. We all got very tired of getting screamed at by these guys.
    And they all had a grille full of those auto club badges that you like, We used to sell all of them for $9.95, mostly to 111, 108 and 110 owners.

    1. facelvega Avatar
      facelvega

      Hilarious splash of cold water on the nostalgic romance of this post. Anybody in rustbelt PA with a spare barn should load up on these junkers and start a little e-business selling parts on the side. Today I bet you'd get $300 per used taillight lens, easy, and interior trim is probably worth gold. Heck, you'd probably get better than $10 a pop for the preaged unearned auto club badges.

      1. dmilligan Avatar

        I really wasn't trying to rain on the author's article, it is a very nice and well done post. But seeing that old 220 and reading the romantic tone of the article dredged up a bunch of old and not so pleasant memories. It's great to admire these old cars, they were great in their day, but owning one and keeping it running in the present, much less restoring it, is not nearly so romantic. Many people overlook this aspect of owning a vintage car and I just thought I'd share.

        1. facelvega Avatar
          facelvega

          I imagine we all get nostalgically giddy when we stumble across a dying classic in the middle of nowhere, and flirt with the idea of doing a restoration. If I'd have been the one to spot it I'm sure I'd have been talking myself into it with much more romance than goingincirclez indulged in up above.

    2. Goingincirclez Avatar

      Yeah, this isn't the first Benz I've seen with a bunch of grille gewgaws, but it's the first I ever had a chance to inspect closely. Obvioulsy, if there's a market for knock-offs on the aftermarket, you could have posers at work, then as now. But still, some of these look old and at least the one badge seems to have a real value as a collectible from a club that no longer exists. So I'd like to think there's some "valid" history at work here.
      I had a friend who owned a '72 420 (not exactly sure on that model) in the late '90s. His recollection of maintenance costs would be much the same as yours. It ran well and looked good, but it was the Arizona dry-rot that made some parts unobtainable.

  3. scroggzilla Avatar

    Back in the day, the well heeled had the option of picking up their new Mercedes at the factory. It's entirely possible that this car and it's original owner did the grand tour of Europe before it was packed into a shipping container to make it's way to the US of A.
    As for the tailfins, Mercedes claimed that they were functional in that they helped to owner better see where he or she was going when reversing into a parking space. Of course, the fact that the Heckflosse was designed in 1957 and then rigorously tested for 2 years before hitting the showrooms could explain how those fins got the Deutschland…….just as they were about to go out of automotive fashion.

    1. DeadinSideInc Avatar

      European delivery is still an option many marques make available, just don't ask you VW dealer for Euro delivery of your Citi Golf….

      1. Impalamino Avatar
        Impalamino

        True. My cousin and her insufferable husband insist on picking up their new BMWs straight from the source.
        Hooray, your resale value is exactly the same.

  4. tenthousandfeet Avatar
    tenthousandfeet

    What is the asking price of this here veteran?

  5. RandomScoobieDude Avatar
    RandomScoobieDude

    Real = Spanish for royal. Same idea with associating things with nobility like the soccer team Real Madrid.

    1. Goingincirclez Avatar

      Ahh… yes, if you use a proper Spanish pronunciation, I can see (er, hear) that. Crap, I knew that at one time too. Thanks for the refresher!

    2. dr zero Avatar

      "Kongelig" also means royal (in Norwegian). "Konge" is king, and "lig" sort of turns things into adjectives.

  6. muthalovin Avatar

    Nicely writing GIC. I was thoroughly rapt and very interested in this cars past. Thanks!

  7. Phil Avatar
    Phil

    Having done such thing as travel / live in Europe with my own Volvo before brigning it back to Canada, I see 3 possible options:
    -the owner was working for the AIT and got transfered here and there;
    -the owner was a US Diplomat;
    -the owner was working for the US forces and got the AIT badge through his membership of the various local associations.
    My two cents.

  8. Charles_Barrett Avatar

    I toured in Western Europe with a college chum in 1982, who indulged me by waiting patiently one afternoon while I took the Mercedes factory tour. I asked the guide why I had seen so many Mercedes on the road without displacement/model designations on the trunk lid. He told me that non-standard body/chassis/engine combinations were left un-badged when built to order. Perhaps that explains this car's lack of decklid badging, rather than removal by a vandal.

    1. Goingincirclez Avatar

      That would be most appropriate, wouldn't it? Unfortunately there are two small holes and some additional discoloration in the exact spot where the nameplate would have been, which leads me to suspect it was actually there at one time.

  9. FuzzyPlushroom Avatar

    My 244 is exactly that – a "Special Delivery" Tourist/Diplomat Sales car. I wish I knew more about her history, as this (evidenced by the decal in the window and the special suedelike owner's manual binder) indicates that someone flew over, bought 'er in Sveedn and brought her back over here. Unfortunately, they didn't bring home E-code headlights.
    <img src="http://hphotos-snc1.fbcdn.net/hs036.snc1/3284_82649401820_563911820_2259698_3149178_n.jpg"&gt;
    (No, it's a 244. Try again.)
    <img src="http://hphotos-snc1.fbcdn.net/hs036.snc1/3284_82649411820_563911820_2259699_1478239_n.jpg"&gt;
    (By the time these became cool, this was almost illegible.)

  10. dmilligan Avatar

    I worked at a Mercedes- Benz dealership for 12 years in the parts dept. and every time one of these old 111's would roll in we'd all cringe. Invariably, the owner had picked it cheap from a private party and was going to restore it, and had no idea what it was going to cost to do so. Parts for these beasts are expensive, when you could find them – a tail light lens sold for around $180 back in the '80s and many parts weren't available even from Germany. The owners figured they were going to restore it uber cheap, and were shocked and angry when they discovered that it wasn't going to work that way. We all got very tired of getting screamed at by these guys.
    And they all had a grille full of those auto club badges that you like, We used to sell all of them for $9.95, mostly to 111, 108 and 110 owners.

  11. engineerd Avatar

    I have a growing desire for a heckflosse Merc. I showed one to my wife a couple weeks ago that was on Autotrader or something and her response was, "It's old." I said she was old, too. It was a lonely night.
    Anyway, the grill badges aren't always used to signify membership in a secret organization or surviving more than 199,999 km. They were also used to denote the home country. Therefore, it's entirely possible the Espana badge is simply for Spain and it would have had a facsimile of the flag or its colors. Since this is a US spec car, it's entirely possible a member of our Armed Forces bought it while stationed in Spain. You could pick them up at the factory.
    <img src="http://www.sandaigprimary.co.uk/pivot/p6sj/images/large_flag_of_spain.gif&quot; style="width: 453px; height: 302px; border: 0" alt="imgTag" />
    Thank you for the research, though! Very well done, and a shining example of why I like Hooniverse. I know it can be frustrating to spend so much time on a post and get few…if any…comments, but please know that we all appreciate it!

    1. Texan_Idiot25 Avatar
      Texan_Idiot25

      I'm sure the couch was colder than the steel of a Benz hood that night.

    2. Goingincirclez Avatar

      I would absolutely love to own one of the wagons ("Heckwagon"? Yes!)… they really are a classy design. Apparently the later runs were available with diesels… there's a Willie Nelson conversion candidate if ever there was!
      It's an honor to write for this site. I love the possible angles people are coming up to explain this one. Picking the car up and driving it in Europe before shipping it here? I wish I could be so lucky. But I know someone who did this with a new Volvo in 2003 or 2004 or so… when this happens, they can export the car as "used" and thus the duties are actually lower. In his case it basically worked out for not much more than buying a new Volvo on US soil, especially when he considered his European vacation as virtually half-subsidized.

      1. engineerd Avatar

        BMW has the same sort of program. I have a dream of having enough scratch to order an M3, spend a couple weeks in Europe with it, then shipping it back. In fact, I think BMW even has a performance driving school you can sign up for. Mmmmmmm….
        Crap, I guess that means I should get to work so I can earn the dough!

        1. FTGDHoonEdition Avatar

          I am definitely signing up for that option, when I get an M3 in the next few years. I've been dreaming about it for quite sometime now. It's like baptizing your made for twisty Europe car on the home soil, before bringing it over to the land of the straight roads. And cheap fuel ;P

  12. Armand4 Avatar

    I've always wanted a Fintail (or a W108… or pretty much any old Benz) as a project car. Once I made the mistake of mentioning this to a mechanic I know. He didn't seem enthusiastic about the idea of a W111 project car, even when I regaled him with stories of their 1-2-3 finish in the Monte Carlo Rally or M-B's fantastic parts support. He just looked at me and said "remember, there is nothing– NOTHING– more expensive than a cheap vintage Mercedes."
    As for this particular car's provenance, European delivery seems plausible, even with the US-spec stacked headlights. My grandparents used to pick up US-spec Peugeots at the showroom in Paris, drive around France visiting relatives, and drop the car off at the port before they left.

    1. Sparky_Pete Avatar

      I just had the pleasure of troubleshooting and working on a beautiful 73 W115 for couple days. It was one of my favorite jobs. Those things are simply amazing how well they are built, and with a little bit of love it purred beautifully even after all these years. If I thought I loved W111s before, I am now COMPLETELY infatuated.
      The owner had several classic Mercedes and the labor bill did not seem to even phase him. In talking to him, he said the same thing you did about them being so expensive. It's as costly as a mistress in Manhattan, and a true labor of love…

  13. Novaload Avatar

    That car is my secret fetish, which I will now scream to the world. I will have one of these. I want a W111. The gravitas of the front end, the flirty little fins on the rear–like butterfly wings on a brick–the angles and curves of the greenhouse. I've been in love since the first time I saw one.

  14. JayRob Avatar
    JayRob

    I live down the street from where Im pretty sure this car is/was. next time I get a chance Ill go hunting for it and see if there is any info to dig up from the lot. They have a bunch of other oddball cars along with muscle or sports cars.

  15. ecigs Avatar

    I loathe this site presented and it has given me some sort of commitment to have success for some reason, so thank you.

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