F1-67 Gives Us Inferiority Complex

The basic concept of Stuart Taylor Motorsport is this: Safety is Overrated. We like it.
The basic concept of Stuart Taylor Motorsport is this: Safety is Overrated. We like it.

Let’s face it, we love cars of all description. We’re pretty much willing to try anything, and there aren’t a whole lot of vehicles that we wouldn’t be chomping at the bit to grab by the scruff of the neck and take for the ride of our lives.
From a personal perspective, I’ve driven a first-gen Dodge Viper, a Lamborghini Murcielago LP640, a 427-powered ’27 T-Bucket, and a Mazda RX2 with a Ford 4.0L V6 from a Ranger, ghettocharged with the twin-turbo setup off a 300ZX. None of these have really scared me. None have made me second guess myself, and wonder whether or not I have what it takes.
This car, on the other hand, does.
If you need a moment, we'll totally understand.
If you need a moment, we'll totally understand.

Here’s their basic philosophy: the Formula One cars of the 1950s were okay, with their front-engined approach; but that improved in the 1960s when they moved to mid-rear engined cars. In 1967 and 68, they reached a pinnacle of design and just all-around hoontacular awesomeness with massive mid-rear engines… and very little else. From that point on, everything went downhill, due to their desire for more aerodynamics, stickier tires, more downforce. Sure, it’s safer, this company says, but where’s the fun in driving an upside-down airplane?
Unfortunately, the possibility of finding a ’67 or ’68 Formula One car is, well, slim. And by “slim”, we mean “non-existant”. Even if you did find one, the price-tag would be well into the millions. So here’s their solution: build a replica.
And what a replica it is! The car is absolutely gorgeous, as these pictures prove, but the concept behind it, and the engineering within it, are even more beautiful. Let’s be blunt: it’s as simple as they can make it. The whole idea is to use off-the-shelf parts that anyone can get their hands on, and anyone can work on easily. The car is designed for you to take to a vintage race series, or to a motor-course club and have an enormous amount of fun without worrying about destroying a multi-million-dollar machine.
The transmission doubles as a defensive mechanism, should anyone try and get up your trumpet.
The transmission doubles as a defensive mechanism, should anyone try and get up your trumpet.

So what do we have under the skin? It’s powered by a Chevrolet LS-series 5.3L V8, with proper Weber downdraft carbs, and run through either the 4-speed from a Porsche 911 or a new ZFQ 5-speed. Weighing in at just over 1400 lbs, it should have a power-to-weight ratio that is comparable with, say, an F-14 Tomcat. But without the wings. Pricing has not yet been released, but we have contacted the manufacturer for more information as it becomes available, so stay tuned.
So, what say you, Hoonigans? Are you “manly” enough to try it? I’d gladly give it a shot, but I think I’d be afraid to put my foot into it like I would with most of my other experiences. Suddenly, I feel like I should really just go have a nice cup of tea and curl up under a blanket for the afternoon. Maybe I’ll try knitting…

[Thanks to Scroggzilla for the tip! Head to the manufacturer’s site for more info, and a whole lot of construction pr0n!]

0 Comments

  1. Yes. A thousand times yes. Sure, used as intended, it could kill me. But, so could sleep apnea. And while piling up an F1-67 would likely and perhaps deservedly merit an "asshole kills self with cool car" post on some blog somewhere, we all know….deep down….that it would be a manly, V8 powered death.

  2. If I ever read, "Asshole kills self with cool car" I'm immediately jealous. Not because I'm suicidal, but because he went out in a blaze of glory. Not peacefully in his sleep or choking on his own vomit.

  3. I read about this during my morning perusal of several websites (aided by Google Reader). I am in love. Seriously, what a fantastic concept. Build a car that is inexpensive to maintain, has the character and devilish charm of a '67 F1 car, and is accessible to anyone with the as-yet-undetermined cash. That as-yet-undetermined cash is destined to be well below the entry point for a true '60s F1 car *and* the owner won't be afraid of wrecking his priceless frame or grenading his priceless engine. Give it the look of a '67 F1 car without having it be an actual replica of anyone in particular, and licensing requirements are a lot cheaper! Can you imagine what Lotus would charge to replicate the Lotus-Ford that won 4 rounds?
    This is a great idea, and I'm kind of kicking myself I didn't think of it. Anybody want to help me build a 1970s Group B replica using an Audi quattro system from the A4 and a twin turbo 2.0L Zetec wrapped in non-specific sheet metal?

  4. I'm thinking a couple of LED headlights could hide in that grill. Some small brake lights/turn signals on the rear. Slap a plate on it and drive it on the street everyday. Georgia is pretty lax on home builts/kits. Looks like it has about as much ground clearance as my Z3.
    I think 1967 or 68 is about the year that my Dad went to the GP at Nurburgring. He was in Germany at the time courtesy of the US Army. He drove all the way to Nuremberg before he found out the track wasn't there. I have a few slides around somewhere.

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