Bolster Boost aims to improve your seating experience


Ted Heys saw a problem and sought a way to fix it. He enjoys driving, be it on a race course or on a canyon road, but he also wants to make sure he’s sitting tight in his seat. The average street car, however, is designed to mix daily comfort with some level of bolstering. Nothing out there replicates the race car seat experience and that’s exactly what Heys wants. So he’s created the Bolster Boost.


This is a non-destructive addition to your seat that is easily adjustable, removable, and swappable between your vehicles. What Ted has created is a far less expensive way to improve your lateral support without the need to jump to a far more expensive racing seat. You retain the daily drivability of your car while also having the option for increased support on and off the track, should you so desire.
Right now the project is in the Kickstarter phase. Ted has nearly met his goal of $8,000 in funding and has a bit over two weeks of campaign timing left to go. Early backers can raise their hand for a Bolster Boost for the price of $79. That’s apparently below the wholesale cost Ted sees before this heads to market.
The Bolster Boost works by combining a left and right side pad. These are held in place on the seat by a rear grip layer. Each side pad is tethered to the other through a set of lace straps and cord locks. And then a set of handles jutting from the pads allows for quick adjustability.
There’s a wealth of information on that Kickstarter page, so you should head there to give this whole thing a look over. And stay tuned, because we have our hands on a prototype which we’ll be testing in a vehicle soon. The plan is to try this in something sporty and then in something with no real bolstering to see if it can help there as well (like my 1974 Mercedes-Benz).
It’s a pretty slick idea, and we can’t wait to tell you how it actually works.
[Source: The Bolster Boost Kickstarter]

4 Comments

  1. Somewhere around 1950 or so, my dad had an opportunity to buy stock in Dairy Queen for essentially nothing (For European readers, and perhaps even our younger North American readers, Dairy Queen was a roadside purveyor of soft serve ice cream – sort of an ice cream McDonalds, if you will).
    However my dad said that he lacked vision, and just couldn’t imagine people going to the trouble of getting in their cars to go buy the stuff. I mean, it wasn’even real ice cream. He was quite wistful about it in later years.
    Sadly, I guess I have inherited a similar lack of vision.

    1. “Was” a roadside purveyor? They’re still around. A new store was built near my office and opened about six months ago.
      DQ is a Berkshire Hathaway company now, according to Wiki.

  2. If you get to test this, be sure to compare it to the classic autocross trick of using the seatbelt’s ratchet to squeeze you firmly against the seat. I got really good results with that trick on a Miata.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

The maximum upload file size: 64 MB. You can upload: image, audio, video. Links to YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and other services inserted in the comment text will be automatically embedded. Drop files here