2021 Chevy Suburban Diesel! – First Drive

The redesigned 2021 Chevrolet Suburban has arrived with some new engine choices. Initially, it was a pair of gas-drinking V8s, but now a diesel-sipping six has arrived. This is our first time behind the wheel of the 2021 Suburban packing Duramax heat. There’s a 3.0-liter inline six-cylinder turbodiesel engine under the hood. And it’s a damn fine, smooth option.

The Duramax diesel mill makes 277 horsepower and 460 lb-ft of torque. Backing that up is a 10-speed automatic gearbox. You can have 2WD or 4WD, and the diesel engine is available on every trim minus the off-road-oriented Suburban Z71. It’s a $995 upcharge on the LS, LT, RST, and Premier trims. If you want a High Country diesel, it’s a decrease in the price of $1,500.

[Disclaimer: Chevy tossed me the keys to this diesel ‘Burban for about 24 hours and included a tank of fuel.]

8 Comments

  1. Excellent. Damned. Engine.

    I’m pretty repulsed by the new full-sized Chevy styling, be it on a Tahoe, Suburban, or Silverado. But this engine? Good stuff. I’d gladly take it in an equivalent GMC, which itself isn’t beautiful, but at least it’s not hideous.

  2. Haven’t had the time to watch the video yet, but what is the rationale for a diesel engine in the US? Fuel is so cheap and these come with monstrous motors. Is the allure in low end torque for trailers or something like that? I also miss an mpg-number in the writeup.

    1. For me, it’s a torque thing, and I don’t even pull a trailer very often. In trucks/SUVs and muscle cars, I want a torque-biased engine. In a lightweight sports car, I prefer a higher-rpm, hp-biased engine. It’s all about fitting the character of the output to the character of the vehicle.

    2. Probably, though I wonder if the US, outside the east and west coast, that hooj place in the middle where hardly anyone lives and you might not find an electric charger for the length of a small European country might start to embrace diesel as way to keep driving trucks while CAFE while Europe moves away from it? It’s sort of win win for everyone really, lower CO2 while NOx is far less a concern in a low population area than it is in densely packed European towns and cities. Vehicles can then be weaned off petrocarbons to biodiesel.

      1. Now I watched it and I keep thinking I need to play “idiot bingo” for every of Jeff’s videos. Calling himself that is probably the most consistent theme. 😀 Great to watch though, and it answered my questions. Spoiled horse kids minivan, got it.

    3. For me, it’s a torque thing, and I don’t even pull a trailer very often. In trucks/SUVs and muscle cars, I want a torque-biased engine. In a lightweight sports car, I prefer a higher-rpm, hp-biased engine. It’s all about fitting the character of the output to the character of the vehicle.

  3. “if you need to haul people and stuff but not tow, get a Transit or Sprinter.”

    Actually, an Odyssey or Sienna will haul almost as much people and stuff for less money, less fuel (although the diesel is close) and easier to drive. But who am I kidding, no one considering a Suburban is going to cross shop a minivan.

    1. Well the diesel will do better in mixed driving and assuming it is a reasonably reliable engine will cost less than a minivan when you consider resale value. Yeah you have to have the money, or credit up front.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

The maximum upload file size: 64 MB. You can upload: image, audio, video. Links to YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and other services inserted in the comment text will be automatically embedded. Drop files here