What do you want to know about Nissan’s 2019 Titan?

This week we’ve got the 2019 Nissan Titan in for review. Nissan’s entry into the fiercely competitive full-size pickup battlefield arrived for the 2004 model year and sat dormant without much of a substantial makeover for more than a decade. The Titan then took 2016 off and hid in hiatus before coming back for the 2017 model year. It was slightly redesigned. Key word, slightly.

You’ll find a new modern exterior appearance. The interior has a improved both in terms of its spaciousness and features, both standard and optional. Plus there are those fresh, healthy powertrain options. One of which is a turbodiesel 5.0-liter V8. And it finally makes the second-generation Titan a worthy contender against the Ram 1500, Chevy Silverado, and Ford’s F-150.

But how’s the Titan selling? Nissan sold some 50,459 Titans last year. That’s down 4.7% compared to 2017, and in January 2019 only 3,031 Titans rolled off dealer lots. That’s nearly half of how many Frontiers were sold at the same time.

But the shy sales figures shouldn’t turn you away from the latest Titan because it is still a solid truck. There’s a lot of good I’ve discovered in the first two days behind the wheel. Such as its responsive and tight handling. A strong, burly gas V8 is paired to a smooth, seven-speed automatic, and the wonderful ride quality that easily rivals the floaty air suspension found on the pricey Ram 1500 Limited I recently tested. Then there’s the comfortable seats, simple controls for the stereo and climate, and one fantastic premium Fender stereo system. I still can’t figure out where all of the speakers are hidden.

This specific Titan is the luxurious Platinum Reserve trim (4×4 Crew Cab), which starts at $57,390. As pictured above, my Deep Blue Pearl model sits at $59,820 and includes $285 LED fog lamps, the $750 “Platinum Utility Package” which brings rear cargo boxes implemented on either side of the bed, locking tailgate, and a deployable utility step, and a whopping $1,395 destination charge.

Four of the Titan’s more popular, hot selling rivals have all seen complete and impressive redesigns within the past two years. I’m hoping Nissan follows through as well because the Titan deserves one.

What do you want know about it? Ask me anything.

By day, Robby DeGraff is an industry analyst for an automotive market research and product-consulting firm. Based an hour from Road America in Wisconsin, he once piloted a Suzuki Jimny around Iceland for two weeks alone. Robby's personal fleet includes a bright red 2001 Chevrolet Camaro that sometimes runs, his second Saabaru wagon, and hopefully a Volkswagen Vanagon in the future.

11 Comments

  1. Is it going to hold up? C&D’s long termer had a litany of problems. And, why is it so unattractive? I know that’s subjective, but, ugh.

  2. Is it going to hold up? C&D’s long termer had a litany of problems. And, why is it so unattractive? I know that’s subjective, but, ugh.

    1. That long term review was a killer, it will stick in every mind that might have given it a shot. The diesel effort was run to market half baked, but I’d give the gas version a close look if it came with the same equipment as the competition at a discount. No one expects a superior product from Nissan, but for the decent, dependable stuff that seems to be their bread and butter, they may have just been passed by the Korean twins.

      1. I agree with that last statement wholeheartedly. It used to be that you went the the Koreans when you wanted an Asian build car but couldn’t afford the really good ones…it seems that their products and images have improved greatly enough to swap slots with Nissan.

        My first car was an 86 Nissan Sentra hatch. 67hp. 5sp. I loved it. 🙂

      2. I agree with that last statement wholeheartedly. It used to be that you went the the Koreans when you wanted an Asian build car but couldn’t afford the really good ones…it seems that their products and images have improved greatly enough to swap slots with Nissan.

        My first car was an 86 Nissan Sentra hatch. 67hp. 5sp. I loved it. 🙂

      3. I’ve owned 1 Nissan, a 1988 Pulsar NX SE. It was perhaps the most trouble prone vehicle I’ve owned, and I’ve owned a 1980 Monza, a 1988 Celebrity and a 1988 Grand Caravan. My expectations for Nissan are very low.

  3. Nissan should dust off the old tooling and start making 2012 Pathfinders again. Just jam in Carplay/Android Auto interface sell it for $27k and churn them out for the next 20 years.

  4. Given the deafening silence here, I guess the right questions are:
    does anyone give a monkeys?
    When are you going to give us a new Z/Silvia/GT-R Nissan?

  5. Nissan should dust off the old tooling and start making 2012 Pathfinders again. Just jam in Carplay/Android Auto interface sell it for $27k and churn them out for the next 20 years.

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