Video: Fahk yeh cahs, fahk yeh doors, and fahk you buddy

mr plow

Alternative titles…

-Mr. Plow says “go to hell”
-Boston plow man gets cranky when low on Dunkin JuiceThe Departed 2: The Day Aftah Tamarrah
I love my job, I hate your life

I’m originally from a town located right next to Boston (Hi Winthrop!). I moved away a little over 10 years ago, but I still love all things Boston. The accent (of which I do not possess, unless drinking with friends from home), the sports teams, the city itself, I love it all. One thing I don’t miss, however, are the terrible winters. Snow is no problem, but once that turns to slush and sleet falls hard on my face as the wind whips into my eyes, ears, and nose I realize that it’s time to get on a plane bound for Southern California.

Someone in Boston enjoys the snow though, not for skiing or snowboarding. Instead, this man enjoys the snow because he operated a plow. Is he happy to help out the motorists of Boston but freeing their vehicles from their cold confines? No. In fact, it seems this driver loves his job for different reasons. Check out the video after the break.

[Source: Bostinno via Reddit]

NSFW Warning: The video is filled with fahkin’ sweahs…

31 Comments

  1. "Yeahhhhh, like a fahkin playdough factory."
    That part, hilarious. The pleasure he derives from being a jerk, not so much.

  2. Man, when I was a kid and the WHDH weatherman got down to "Winthrop" there was no chance my town was going to have a snow day. Didn't it kill you to have to wait all the way from Abington through Windsor? Talk about a let down.
    And this guy… sounds like the snow's not the only thing getting plowed.

    1. There were groups of school districts that would always cancel together. I grew up in Lexington, so Arlington getting cancelled was a good sign, and if Bedford and Burlington or Concord were cancelled, Lexington was nearly guaranteed, and Waltham was pretty well assured.
      Once Lexington was visible rolling up the screen, epic celebrations could begin, and after all possible homework was done, we could look forward to the awesomeness of goofing off, playing in the snow, helping shovel, etc. etc.

      1. :sigh:
        *looks outside – dark, cold, windy, pot-hole ridden roads, half-melted black snow, massholes honking at each other as the attempt to get onto I-93,…*

        1. Oh, our roads aren't any smoother than yours. In fact, in my experience, ours at about parity. But no ice.

  3. Fahk yeh cahs
    Go fuckin find yeh cah next fuckin spring!
    God, if only I could have that much fuckin plowing. I mean fuckin ay.
    I only had to dig my 280ZX out from under a few feet of Iowa snow for one winter; the winters I spent there after that, it never quite snowed hard enough to need to dig the thing out. I tell you, it was a hell of a trick getting out of a snowy spot on an incline with RWD and no snow tires

  4. Man, i'm tired of it. You finish the driveway and an hour later the plow comes by and berms the apron again. Parking on the street overnight is illegal here in the winter, so having cars plowed in isn't a regular occurrence given that the plow guys work nights unless there's a storm big enough to require OT during the day.
    I'll know spring is on its way when they send the crews out with the frontendloaders and dump trucks to remove the berms (hasn't been a bad enough winter for that to get done more than once). It better come quick. I'm tired of shoveling, wearing a coat and boots, and all the rest of the winter shit. Besides, i want my fahking car back.

  5. I lived in Boston, and I understand. People shovel their spaces into the street, and then get pissed when the plow comes by to clear the street. Where exactly did they think the snow was going to go? And after they yell at the plowman one too many times because they can't figure out what role their own behavior is playing, what kind of attitude would one expect the plowman to develop? This attitude.
    Did anyone notice he's doing a good job of clearing the roads? if he was an over polite fawning simp he'd still plow the same way. I'd hire this guy any day.

    1. What always burned my socks was when I shoveled my snow into my front 'yard' in Jamaica Plain (where 'yard' means patch of concrete slab) but the jerk up the street threw his out into the road, where the plow would grab it and throw it all into my space.
      This is the real reason no one bothers to move the snow to the other side of the car, you're just gonna get effed over by the other shmuck anyway.

    2. Where you put your snow is an issue, one that requires significant forethought and planning, but it doesn't really matter in the end because you'll still get the berm. Any decrease in the berm size from the plow based on where you put your snow is almost imperceptibly small. I've done many years of extensive, anecdotal research on this issue.
      I've got a four car driveway (which only sees two cars in the winter). Early snows see me clear it to 10+ feet wider than it's constructed width. I shovel the apron wide enough to park two cars and leave another 5+ feet on the edges. I'm helped here by the vacant lot to my South, since i'm not piling onto my neighbors driveway. This is calculated to compensate for my own berm creation as the winter drags on, as well long-term planning that i'll be significantly more lazy at the end of the winter than the beginning. All told, even at the end, we may not be able to see the street leaving the driveway, but there will be at least enough room to comfortable open doors and walk around the cars. I even shovel 3 – 4' out into the street and 10 – 15' on either side of the apron in the street.
      The problem is that the only snow the plows deposit on the side of the road is what curls over the height of the berms. That's less and less as the berms grow higher and higher. (right now, the berm in front of the vacant lot is about 4' tall) Anywhere there's a gap in the berm – driveways, for example – the plow deposits as much of the pushed load as the space allows. Plow trucks make the longest possible straight line run which means a lot of built up snow on the blade. Me, i'm almost at the end of a 5 block push.
      In other words, i'm fahked. Unfortunately, we got another 5" last night and the plow just went buy. I haven't even finished clearing the 3' deep drifting from the back end of the drive that built up (a second time) from early this week. So enough theory for me, i have to go out there and shovel.

    3. Exactly. He's got to do it one way or the other. Might as well fahking enjoy it.
      Besides, when I lived in Truckee, I had a room off of one of the side streets on the Northwoods loop. The plow schedule was such that they'd plow the loop first and then go back and do some of the smaller sides streets. I lived on one that had some plowing priority, so it got plowed every time Northwoods did. However, if I drove home while they were still working on Northwoods, there would be a nice berm across the entrance to my street.
      Now. The plows are doing their job in an ordered and reasonable fashion. This was no time to get mad about a two foot berm, particularly since it wasn't packed down at all and the road beyond was quite clear. This was the time to keep some momentum going through the left hand turn so I could bust through the berm. And by "keep some momentum" I mean drift the corner, dab some oppo and throttle and enjoy the obstacle.
      Plows can be your friend.

  6. I learned to drive on my dad's Mercury Thunderbird (V8, RWD) back in New England – two of my first three cars were RWD.
    Driving in California I've learned that people who learned to drive in California are typically terrible drivers (not you Tim, sheesh…)

    1. I lived in Colorado for a while. I learned to automatically give any car with a California plate a wide berth, especially when there was any form of precipitation.
      That became a problem when I moved from Colorado to California.

      1. But the rule doesn't change. Just the difficulty in implementation… (Learned to drive in Washington. Every October, it's like no one has ever seen a drop of rain in their lives.)

  7. This doesn't even show the most special part of winter parking in Boston (on-street city parking, specifically).
    If someone shovels out a spot after a huge storm, they put an old kitchen or folding chair in it, or a stack of cheapo storage crates or whatnot. This saves their spot for a vaguely-agreed-upon three or four days after the storm. They shoveled it out, they own it, they move the spot-saver up onto a snowbank while their car is in the spot.
    Depending on the neighborhood, moving someone else's space-saver and parking in their spot without getting permission means you'll return to flat tires, keyed paint, etc.
    The complication comes from exactly how long a person can claim ownership of a shoveled out spot. One day? Three days? Until spring melt? People have come to blows over this.

    1. I would drive through east boston to get to Winthrop… man, I'd be scared to steal a saved spot there.

    1. Can I be the one to name the reality show??
      Fired and the you tube was taken down.
      Seems like a harsh reaction.

      1. Agreed. Didn't expect the dude to get fired. Glad the news didn't say "HOONIVERSE.COM GETS LOWELL MAN FIRED"

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