The News for August 5th, 2022

Welcome to the Hooniverse News! As always, this is a weekly recap of the biggest stories in the automotive industry without the fluff or bull. This week: Ford adds Maverick Tremor option as order books reopen, Porsche shows off their GT3 competitor for next season, Nissan is killing off the Maxima next year, and your news for the week.

Ford Maverick Tremor

The Ford Maverick has been such a hit among buyers who maybe don’t want to spend $50k minimum on a new truck that Ford had to stop taking orders earlier this spring. This week, they announced that order books are back open for the 2023 model year and there will be a new flavor as well. The Maverick is getting the Tremor treatment. Similar to the Tremor packages we’ve seen on the Super Duty, F-150, and Ranger, this one builds on top of the FX4 package and provides numerous upgrades for those who like to get dirty.

The Maverick’s Tremor option is available on XLT and Lariat models with the 2.0-liter EcoBoost (no hybrid). The Tremor package adds an improved AWD system which features a twin-clutch rear-drive unit with a differential lock for improved off-road performance. Another exclusive feature is Trail Control, which Ford says is like cruise control for off-road driving. It allows the driver to focus on wheel placement rather than correct throttle and brake application.

Additional off-road hardware includes Tremor-exclusive front and rear springs and shocks. In addition to a 1″ increase in ride height, this new combo should keep the compact truck more composed on rough terrain. Ford also upgrades the half-shafts and adds a heavy-duty transmission cooler. The Tremor package rides on 235/65R17 A/T tires which look to be Falken Wildpeaks from the press images. Approach, departure, and breakover angles are greatly improved over the standard truck at 30.7, 22.2, and 19.9 degrees respectively.

The off-road equipment does impact payload and towing capacities though. Payload is reduced to 1,200 lbs (compared to 1,500 lbs) and towing is capped at 2,000 lbs, which is the same as other Mavericks without the 4k Tow Package – a feature not available on the Tremor.

Just like other Tremors, signature orange accents are added inside and out. The Maverick Tremor gets a unique grille finish with orange accents, blacked-out Ford logos, unique headlamps and taillamps, and orange tow hooks. Special 17″ aluminum wheels are finished in dark gray but sport an orange accent in one corner as well. The cabin gets Black Onyx seats with stitched Tremor logos and orange accents. The center console, register vents, and door pulls carry the same theme. For an additional $1,495, you can opt for the Tremor Appearance Package which adds a Carbonized-Gray painted roof and mirror caps plus black side graphics on the hood and lower body.

Production for the 2023 Maverick begins this fall. Order books for regular versions should be open now while the Maverick Tremor is available sometime in September. Pricing for the Tremor package is $2,995 plus an additional $1,495 if you want the sick graphics for five additional horsepower. Depending on how Ford decides to group everything together (they make force you to add other packages too), the cheapest Maverick Tremor you can build could start at $30,505. That was using an XLT with the 2.0L EcoBoost and AWD equipped separately, as the Tremor package isn’t on the configurator yet. Whether any one of Ford’s magnificent and not at all scummy as shit dealerships will let you pay MSRP for it is anyone’s guess.

[Source: Ford]

Porsche 911 (992) GT3 R

Right after Ferrari unveiled the 296 GT3 leading up to the Spa 24 Hours, Porsche joined in on the fun. The 911 GT3 R has been a favorite among customer racing teams all around the world and it’s time it got updated to the 992 generation, just as the road cars have. Its main improvements over the existing model come down to a larger engine, more consistent aerodynamic performance, and optimized balance. And it just looks incredible.

One of the bigger changes sits at the back of the car. The naturally-aspirated flat-six engine is now at a higher displacement, from 4.0-liters to 4.2-liters. This, along with other improvements they probably won’t tell us about, boost the engine’s peak output to 565 horsepower and allowed for a more optimized power and torque curve. Balance of Performance ultimately dictates how much power a car can have and it differs in every series. But Porsche acknowledges that by adding more power from the get go, they can tap into a larger performance reserve as BoP dictates. If the car can run reliably for 24 hours at the full 565-horsepower engine map, imagine what it can do when it’s restricted to 500 horsepower.

The car’s aerodynamics are assisted by slightly repositioning the engine. They’ve tilted it forward by 5.5 degrees which creates more space for the underbody diffuser, a significant source of downforce for modern race cars. Auxiliary components like the alternator and air conditioning compressor have been moved forward and further down into a space in front of the engine and gearbox, this improving the car’s weight balance as well.

Porsche focused heavily on updating the suspension to achieve more desirable characteristics on track and in the garage. The new car has more precise steering, less rear tire wear, and will be quicker to adjust during setup changes between sessions. KW shock absorbers offer five adjustment settings which are done with shims – these are plates that enable precise adjustments without the need to realign the suspension afterward.

Central pivot points at the front axle were repositioned slightly to free up space for the aerodynamic underfloor, a concept borrowed from the 911 RSR that competes in GTE. This cleaner flow of air to the rear diffuser reduces the pitch sensitivity in various situations, including a high rake under heavy braking. And last but not least, the wheelbase is extended by 48mm or 1.89 inches which reduces the load on the rear tires and improves consistency of the tires’ performance over a long stint.

Aerodynamically, the car has greater emphasis on underbody aerodynamics than before. The underbody ahead of the front axle is raised, the entire undertray is smooth, and a larger rear diffuser provides greater downforce without a significant increase in drag. The biggest aero change you can see from the outside is a new rear spoiler with a swan-neck mount for the first time, just as with the road-going 992-generation 911 GT3. The swan-neck mount ensures clean airflow under the wing by moving all the mounting components up top.

The Porsche 911 (992) GT3 R will make its global competition debut at the 2023 Rolex 24 Hours at Daytona. Porsche Motorsport North America will offer the car to customer teams for $567,210.

[Source: Porsche]

Nissan Maxima is getting the axe

If you’re a convicted super speeder or in a high-risk insurance group, you’ve only got a short time left to order your Nissan Maxima. According to a report from Motor1, Nissan is giving their top-of-the-line sedan the axe next year. The 2023 model year will be the last of their full-size sedan following a long career spanning back to the 1981 model year.

Nissan’s statement to Motor1 explains the decision as “part of Nissan’s Ambition 2030 plan”, in which the company will be “prioritizing electric vehicles and advanced technologies”. The question I’m sure is being asked by those recently deemed at fault is “why not just make the Maxima electric”. I’m sure that will be in the cards at some point, but you see, the Maxima made the grave mistake of not being a crossover in the 2020s, so it deserved to die. Perhaps the nameplate will be revived as yet another electric crossover that will compete for market share with Nissan’s other electric crossovers that are slightly different in size.

[Source: Motor1]

What’s your automotive news?

hooniverse news whats your naws

That’s all I’ve got for you this week, so now it’s your turn. If you saw anything, fixed something, broke everything, or otherwise did anything even remotely car related that you want to share with your fellow hoon, sound off in the comments.

Have a good weekend.

I'm the guy that spoiled the site with all the new car stuff. Hooniverse News Editor since 2011, amateur motorsport photographer, sim racer, and mountain road enthusiast.

18 Comments

  1. Cruise control quit working on my truck a while back and I finally decided to actually do research on it. Seems like the cruise control release switch is known to go bad on 10th-gen F-150s. Ordered the part from RockAuto and it’s taken an… interesting route. It ended up shipping from a warehouse no more than 10 miles away from me. 2 days later it’s on the opposite side of Atlanta, 40+ miles away. It’s now at a distribution center in my town. I wasn’t expecting them to make a straight shot to my place, but like… there are tons of distribution centers around my area, and they chose one over 40 miles away. I’ll never understand couriers.

      1. It is. From everything I’ve read the new parts will have the fix in place already. I made sure to get the Motorcraft version just in case. And uuuuuuuh hopefully the sources were right lol

  2. No real automotive news to report, but when I opened Hooniverse today, I got targeted ads from a business that transports people’s yachts to locations on the other side of the ocean, by loading them onto a gigantic transporter ship that hauls dozens of yachts and superyachts at one time.

    The funny thing is, I’m not really in the market for sending my yacht to some other part of the world because, to the best of my recollection, I don’t own a yacht.

  3. I somehow missed last week’s news post, so you get 2 weeks from me. I’m sure you’re thrilled.

    Two weeks ago I wrapped up putting my kid’s 2002 Protege back together after a minor rearend mishap. I knew the car had been wrecked before, but didn’t realize the vertcal core support hadn’t been put back on. So, when they submarined under an SUV and caught the trailer hitch, it really did a number on the hood and upper core support. Surprisingly, after pushing the hood down, I was able to drive it home. No radiator leaks, though I did discover that the nipple to the overflow bottle had broke off, so it got a new radiator. That and an AC condenser, a receiver/drier, a parts store AC recharge and some sheet metal and it’s back on the road for a few hundred dollars.

    I needed new leaf springs for the Tundra (Passenger side broke) and was going to install them myself but wrestling 50lb springs into place didn’t sound like fun, so I started calling places for prices. First place wanted $900 per side. That’s a big nope. Next place said if I buy the parts they’d put ’em on for $300. Now we’re talking. Springs and hardware on Rock Auto were about $400, so I ordered them. Then A friend posted that their son in law was a mechanic and doing work on the side, so I asked him. $208, and he’d do it at the house. Sold.

    He came last weekend and put them on. He showed up with only 1 jack stand, no breaker bar and no torque wrench, but he borrowed mine and got it done. Shortly after, I discovered that he put one of the shackle bolts in backwards and the tip of the bolt was trapped in a hole in the shackle mount, limiting the spring travel. The RH side of the truck is sitting ~3″ lower than the left as a result. I’ve been trying all week to get him to commit to a time to come back to fix it. He wanted me to come to the dealer where he worked, say I needed a “free safety inspection” and then text him and he could put it on the lift and fix it. Kinda shady, in my view, so I refused. He’s supposed to come here tomorrow, but I’m probably going to fix it myself today because I frankly don’t trust the guy at this point. I was trying to help the little guy, but I guess that’s part of the risks of going cheap. At least I didn’t have to do most of the heavy lifting.

    1. Swapped the bolt in about an hour. Put the truck on stands and the passenger side axle wouldn’t drop. The bolt in that hole basically had trapped the spring from moving. Had the jack under the axle as I removed the bolt and heard it pop loose. Then lowering the jack let the axle drop.

      The springs I bought were different R & L and after we were done the L was about 3″ higher than the R. Thought I had the wrong springs, but it turns out the main problem was this bolt. It’s still not level, but only 1″ out instead of 3″. The L is thicker, I think because the driver, fuel tank and transfer case are all on the left side.

      1. The dreaded tape measure. After lifting and lowering a few trucks over the years, I chased symmetry far too long for far to little effect.

        1. Not worried about 1″, but the 3″ clearly wasn’t right. Compare the bumper to the cut line in the concrete just ahead of the rear tires. Truck’s lined up with the cut.

          1. Agreed, people pay good money for 3″ lifts for the cosmetic difference, you wouldn’t want 1/4 of one accidentally.

  4. drove around in a 2.5 swapped NC miata with a cam. that’s a really fun car! NCs are underrated.

  5. Well I got the Marauder back together put a couple hundred miles on it and then pulled the diff cover off again to check everything out. I had stuck some very strong magnets to the diff cover with double stick tape since I was still getting glitter out of the axle tubes after several hours of cleaning per side. When the gear oil started draining it did have a greyish tint to it, instead of the golden color. Once the cover was off I found a lot of material on the magnets. It was interesting what they looked like. I had two below the oil level, one down low to the side, one low in the path of the ring gear and one up out of the oil again in the path of the ring gear. Both below the water line had a lot of material on them. The one up high had a ring of black around the outside of the disc. The one down low had a beard effect, a semi circle of material on the bottom half or so of the magnet. The one under the water line in the path of the ring gear had a beard effect too, but it was off to the side. Not sure if the clearance is that tight or if the flow of oil is that strong that it washed it off. Put it all back together and I’m going to run it ~500mi and see what I find then. It is still running quiet, fingers crossed I find much less material on the magnets next time.

    I took care of some of the other issues on it, found some of those crappy vinyl insulated connectors on the fog light wiring where someone had spliced on a new plug. Repaired those wires correctly and both fog lights are working properly again. I bought the Hella Yellow H1 bulbs for it. Partially because I’m old school and grew up with non-clear fog lights and partially because I think the yellow is a nice contrast on the black car. I also took the mirror switch apart, cleaned it up and got it working. I’m also getting the front passenger side window to roll down from the master switch. It is still a little touchy but seems to be cleaning its own contacts the more I use it. Still need to do the power door lock motor for the driver side rear and replace the rear speakers but those are a low priority for now as I shift my focus to getting to some of the big pickup’s needs.

    So I did some more work on my canopy door rebuild. More grinding, filing, drilling, tapping and riveting. Over all the door doesn’t flop around like it used to since it was mainly held together by the skin. I’ve got a couple of more gussets that I plan to make and install today and I’ll call that good. I finally ordered up a new EVAP cannister which is due Monday. Finally I won’t have to pop the hood and disconnect the line to the purge valve to be able to fill the tank at a reasonable rate. The front end is a bit sloppy so that is also on the list to do a full inspection of the front end and see what it needs. Finally I need to pick out an alarm and get it installed.

    The other day the wife called when she was a mile or so from the house that the SUV had overheated. I had checked the coolant not that long ago and it was basically full. For some reason that vehicle does use some coolant but I haven’t found the source yet. So I ordered up some coolant. It was impossible to find the right stuff locally that wasn’t a 50/50 mix. I’m not going to pay $20 a gallon for water, plus since I plan on giving it a good flush and there is no way to fully empty it I couldn’t get a proper mix with the 50/50 stuff.

    1. My x3 has used a little coolant as long as I’ve owned it, as in maybe a few ounces over 5k miles. No clue where it goes, but, I just top it off when needed.

      1. Yeah this one didn’t use any coolant for the first 16-17 years we owned it. I did recieve the coolant yesterday so I did a flush and changed the thermostat. The fan clutch is definitely shot so one of those is due on Wed. The test drive in 80 degree weather also showed it heating up on the scan tool to 224 on a drive at 50mph. Not sure if that is possibly due to it not being fully burped, so this morning I’m going to see if the coolant level went down below the cold fill level, top it off if needed, do a manual burp at the heater core hose and another test drive. I’m afraid a new radiator is in its future. The pain of it all is that it has a fake temp gauge. Sure it reads linearly up until it reaches around the normal operating temp. Once it gets there it has a huge dead band before it then heads for the H peg. So yeah at 224 it read no different than at the proper 192. I guess that is better than the oil pressure gauge that reads in the middle if the pressure is above 8psi.

  6. Still waiting on the glass door the m3. The shop I’ve chosen to do the work, let’s just say I hope their workmanship is better than their customer service, at least to this point.

    In related news, for purchasing the m3 I got a one day car clinic at the bmw performance center, which I’m doing this Wednesday in Thermal, CA. Looking forward to shredding their tires!

  7. Finally received my Maverick (XL hybrid). My dealership is a “no markup” dealer and the process was super easy. I was probably at the dealer total 2 hours (much of which was talking to the salesman who volunteers at the same firehouse my brother(a paid firefighter for about 20 years) did years ago. He is in the process of being accepted at paid fire department as well). My truck had about 9 miles on the odometer and I put another 60. I watched the fuel economy rise to about 37mpg. Very smooth and quiet ride. I’m already planning to do add some accessories.

  8. Since I avoided having to work on a car this weekend I’ll note that #1 son replaced the thrashed speakers in his Corolla with 4 new Kickers after discovering that the old Kenwoods from my Escort deteriorated after 10 years in the garage.
    Also after almost two weeks I got my Pelican Kayak parts form Canada so I now have a paddle holder like the new ones. I’m waiting for some slightly cooler weather to ride motorcycles

  9. Almost successful EFI install on the Firebird. On the first try, it cranked over way less than the average carb start and hummed smoothly to idle. Unfortunately, I quickly noticed fuel dripping off the bottom of the gas tank and shut it down and dried everything up. I somehow managed to leave (or make) something loose on the pump/return/vent lines. So I have to drop the tank again, but at least I have the straps all stretched/conformed, so that should be easier the second time around. Presuming this ends up a matter of tightening the right stuff up, I’ll be on to replacing the ignition with a setup that will control the timing too. I’m going to do something ceremonial with my mostly ineffectual and now fully retired choke wire.

    1. Bummer about the fuel leak but definitely encouraging that it started up and quickly on the first try.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

The maximum upload file size: 64 MB. You can upload: image, audio, video. Links to YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and other services inserted in the comment text will be automatically embedded. Drop files here