Name That Car


Y’all know the drill- fire up those search engines because this one’s harder than week-old Krispy Kremes.
Here’s a few hints-
• VERY limited production
• Not of European descent
• The company that provided the engine has since gone out of business.
Good luck!

28 Comments

      1. Well, it was included in Hyman's print ad in the January issue of Classic and Sports Car magazine (aka current bathroom reading material). So, I owe it's recognition not to my superior memory, but to my regular constitution.

      2. I knew it looked incredibly familiar! That very photo was in a book of lovely postwar cars I had as a kid… as such, I know more about cars from '50-'59 than I should, though my knowledge of prewar iron is comparatively rather lacking.

    1. Seriously. Between you, Mike the Dog, and Ate Up With Motor, I think the entire auto industry since 1930 is archived. Throw in Hemmings and the entire auto industry dating back to its invention is archived.

        1. Scarier yet – and entirely plausible – what if they haven't forgotten anything?!
          Thanks for saving me a night of aggravation, Mr. Scroggs! Oddly enough, I thought of Kaiser for some reason even though I knew that wasn't it. Couldn't make the next leap.

      1. Seriously. When I sent Schmo those pictures of that compressor from Ruby, and someone here sent them to Hemmings, it was amazing how quickly those guys ID'ed that Caddy motor. Some smart guys over there, and here, too.

    2. Boss. It does seem like the whole of the automotive interwebs is indexed between a few Hooniverse regulars. That is reassuring. Deftly done, scroggzilla.

  1. And here I thought this would provide hours of fun for the whole family. Of course, I failed to take into consideration the epically vast knowledge bank that is Mr. Scroggzilla.
    For the record, the blue car is one of five convertibles built on the 100-inch wheelbase of the Henry J platform, and is powered by a 324-cid Olds Rocket V8. The car is an Amelia Island winner, and could be yours for only $159,500.
    http://www.hymanltd.com/search/details.asp?stockn

    1. I just finished reading AUWM's article on Kaiser-Fraser (excellent reading, by the way) and find it intriguing that these are built on the Henry J platform (a Kaiser platform that fulfilled the original dream of Kaiser building a compact car) with the Rocket 88 engine (an engine K-F tried to license from GM, but couldn't). Ironic.

      1. I, too, just read that excellent write-up on Kaiser-Frazer on AUWM… Once I read my way thru all of the articles in their archives, I am going to suffer some serious withdrawal. I am proud that I remembered the Darrin when anticipating Part 2 of the article on Kaiser, but only because I actually saw one at an L.A. area car show.

        1. I gathered enough info to do a little separate article on the Kaiser-Darrin, which I might do later in the year. The main problem right now is that I have no decent pictures of it.
          The Henry J platform was very popular with hot-rodders. In fact, I don't think I've ever seen one in the metal that wasn't rodded almost beyond recognition. It was cheap, sturdy, lightweight, and you could fit a V8 under the hood without a lot of difficulty. For drag racing, you wouldn't have to do a lot to strip it, since trim (particularly on the earliest cars) was minimal to begin with.

        2. I gathered enough info to do a little separate article on the Kaiser-Darrin, which I might do later in the year. The main problem right now is that I have no decent pictures of it.
          The Henry J platform was very popular with hot-rodders. In fact, I don't think I've ever seen one in the metal that wasn't rodded almost beyond recognition. It was cheap, sturdy, lightweight, and you could fit a V8 under the hood without a lot of difficulty. For drag racing, you wouldn't have to do a lot to strip it, since trim (particularly on the earliest cars) was minimal to begin with.

  2. This is taken from http://auto.howstuffworks.com/1953-1955-edwards-a
    The first Edwards America (not the first car Edwards built) used a 185-bhp, 303.7-cid Oldsmobile Rocket V-8. Only five more Edwards Americas would be completed. Two received Lincoln's 205-bhp, 317.5-cid V-8; the other three ran with 210-bhp 1953-spec Cadillac 331s. All rode a Mercury station wagon chassis sectioned to a 107-inch wheelbase, providing greater rigidity.<i/>
    Unsurprisingly, I had never heard of these cars before today. I really like how they look. It is a shame that the exclusivity of them means I will never own one.

  3. I felt like Chekov coming charging in to this thread yelling, "I kin doo zees! I kin doo zees!" only to discover that Scroggs had already beaten me to it. And the only reason I knew was purely by fluke, I stumbled across a photo a few days ago while looking for something on a mid '50s Oldsmobile.

    1. I thought Ghia right away but the 'VERY limited production' hint made me realize that I'm not that educated enough, yet.

  4. I was damn sure this was either going to be some heretofore unheard of Cunningham, or maybe a Glasspar. Nope – even more obscure. But pretty cool – anything based on a Henry J packing a V8 gets respect from me.

  5. Lordy, what a lovely car. The proportions are just right, everything seems to fit. OK, now I know what an Edwards America looks like. Learned something today.

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