Last Call: Mad Max Fury Road minus the CGI is still bonkers

Mad Max Fury Road is one hell of a film. It’s a blood-soaked, fuel-dripping thrill ride from start to finish and it’s also rather gorgeously shot. There’s a bit of CGI employed, of course. But maybe not as much as you think.

Twitter user @coenesqued (AKA Reconsidering Cinema) posted a clip showing tons of the driving stunts from the film. This is before post-production work has been applied. As you can see, like @coenesqued says, it’s straight insane.

Last Call indicates the end of Hooniverse’s broadcast day. It’s meant to be an open forum for anyone and anything. Thread jacking is not only accepted, it’s encouraged.

29 Comments

  1. That’s a lot of wasted heat. Smoothly lastcalling this one: Snake seats, how much energy do they consume? Heating the EV takes about 3 kW for a while until it levels out, but can max out at 6 kW*. Consumers other than climate control are displayed on a small scale in 0.5 kW increments. Heated seats do not show up on any display at all, in contrast to, say, driving lights. Is this a way of saying that heating your backend directly massively trumps heating an entire car cabin? At least with one person only…

    *for reference, staying at 80-90 kph on a flat-ish surface takes about 8-10 kW, uphill 20-25 kW, maximum acceleration 80 kW.

    1. Another reason I don’t understand luxury EVs. How can it really be about efficiency if it’s about wasteful indulgence? (I’m assuming we’re talking about the Audi, not Mad Max.)

    2. Another reason I don’t understand luxury EVs. How can it really be about efficiency if it’s about wasteful indulgence? (I’m assuming we’re talking about the Audi, not Mad Max.)

      1. It’s a prole Leaf, but taking it as a challenge, I don’t see why indulgence and a nerdy focus on stats need to collide.

        1. I don’t equate a “nerdy focus on stats” with efficiency. As spectator sports go, I find baseball to be a colossal waste of time, yet my good statistician friend is obsessed with it.
          With internal combustion engines, you have vehicles with a long-range supply of fuel that can easily and quickly be replenished. Power isn’t a limitation, so parasitic luxuries aren’t a concern. With EVs, every whistle and bell mark on the options sheet is a leech potentially preventing you from going as far (or as quickly) as you want. Indulgence in this case is indeed at odds with efficiency.
          Besides, I’ve never been cold enough in a car to want seat heaters. I hate those things.

          1. Don’t you see that there are countless approaches to what constitutes luxury, tech avantgarde or interests in cars? I wouldn’t buy 8 of 10 vehicles in the market today, but I am not the only customer. Some people have a daily driving pattern that fits EVs well and there is really no need to talk them down if they want some luxury and can afford the price. And heated seats, as well as steering wheels, windows and mirrors, are a very practical thing in the North.

          2. Don’t you see that there are countless approaches to what constitutes luxury, tech avantgarde or interests in cars? I wouldn’t buy 8 of 10 vehicles in the market today, but I am not the only customer. Some people have a daily driving pattern that fits EVs well and there is really no need to talk them down if they want some luxury and can afford the price. And heated seats, as well as steering wheels, windows and mirrors, are a very practical thing in the North.

          3. there are countless approaches to what constitutes luxury
            Best personified by Old Mercedes-Benz (spartan but very well built, with materials that will last forever) versus New Mercedes-Benz (build quality and materials no better than average, but lots of gadgets and geegaws. But make sure to sell it before the warranty expires).

            As far as luxury EVs: I’d rather see people conspicuously consume while reducing their environmental impact (Tesla) than conspicuously consume while increasing it (rolling coal).

          4. Where I live, nearly 85% of the electricity is generated from burning fossil fuels. EV or not, my neighbor’s Tesla is still delivering the environment a firm kick in the nuts. Until we’re making clean electricity for the grid, EVs are just as polluting as the nearest power plant.

            Besides, heavy-duty vehicles (buses, tractor trailers, sanitation trucks, etc) generate a full quarter of emissions of the entire transportation sector, yet they’re only about 5% of the vehicles on the road. An electric bus would therefore have six times the beneficial environmental impact of a luxury EV.

            EV passenger cars aren’t a bad idea– they’re just the wrong focus.

          5. You don’t have to wait for the grid if you own your own home, solar panels and wind turbines are available. As are “green energy” grid providers in many areas for those who don’t own their own house.

            But yes, there are a many many ways to achieve similar things: reducing energy use (by insulating or changing the thermostat), reducing unnecessary transportation, etcetera.

          6. It feels as if we’re arguing two different points. I didn’t even pose this as an argument– it was a literal question to express my lack of understanding (or perhaps my differing perspective) regarding the purpose and value of EVs in the automotive world. I’m not trying to argue that a luxury EV isn’t appealing to some buyers, or that your comment about electricity consumption rates is absurd (in fact, it’s spot-on), or that all that heated stuff isn’t useful where it’s cold. I don’t contest any of that. What I tried to convey is that my personal view of the EV is at odds with the concept of “luxury”.

            Because many luxury features utilize power from the same source as does the EV motor, they are therefore by definition (not opinion) parasitic to the function of travel. They reduce the range, period. An ICE is technically less efficient because of the alternator, but to a much less significant degree (or is it?– I don’t really know, but would be interested to find out). Perhaps luxury features simply have an opportunity cost that EV buyers are willing to pay at the expense of range, much like having air conditioning, power brakes, power steering, etc. technically tax an ICE. However, given the greater range, minimal refueling times, and ubiquitous refueling options of conventional cars, such luxuries don’t seem to come with much of a compromise if you can afford their initial purchase.

            Simply put, I think EVs should first achieve conventional driving expectations before tacking on the electronic leeches. In the meantime, I think plug-in hybrids provide the benefits of the ICE without the compromises of the full-EV, while at the same time continue to advance the technologies that will eventually bring us the long-range, quick-recharge EV that we know is possible.

          7. Yeah, we do – I understand your perspective and it makes sense. Just saying that luxury EVs are not your thing then yet…but others are willing to accept that. I remember how purists couldn’t fathom that BMW offered the 7-series with a diesel. But, for a while, it made sense. These cars were powerful with good ranges – but the original intent of the diesel, haul heavy and save fuel, did not apply at all.

            Variation is good. May make no sense to us, but nobody knows what kind of automobile tech will win. For my part, I want to like hybrids, but the usual CVT just kills it for me. Was inches from buying a Lexus earlier this spring, but this transmission is a hurdle I cannot clear.

          8. I share your distaste for CVTs. Unfortunately, I think they’re here to stay. The scientist in me must admit that they make sense, but the driving purist in me hates them with a passion.

          9. I share your distaste for CVTs. Unfortunately, I think they’re here to stay. The scientist in me must admit that they make sense, but the driving purist in me hates them with a passion.

          10. If nothing else, EV’s are pretty much guaranteed to be quieter and smoother than ICE vehicles,so that’s a little refinement bump as long as the range and charging times fall within your needs.

    3. I attended a launch thing for the Leaf at the local head office, they definitely talked about including heated seats because like you say, it’s a more efficient way to provide heat to the front passengers.

  2. “I just watched Mad Max: Fury Road again last week, and I tell you I couldn’t direct 30 seconds of that. I’d put a gun in my mouth. I don’t understand how [George Miller] does that, I really don’t, and it’s my job to understand it. I don’t understand two things: I don’t understand how they’re not still shooting that film and I don’t understand how hundreds of people aren’t dead.”
    – Steven Soderbergh

  3. I may need to re-watch this movie, because I the first time through, I was glad for it to end. Perhaps I was ill that day and unreceptive to entertainment, or just not in the mood for a willful suspension of disbelief. I do remember thinking some scenes– however well-executed– dragged out ad nauseam, and the pompous campiness of the villains occasionally made me cringe. The writers attempted to assign a level of gravity to the story that simply didn’t stick with me. It wasn’t enough for me to stop watching, but more than once I wondered if there might be better ways to spend my time. However, nothing compares to the twelve minutes I suffered through Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story before turning it off in disgust.

    Considering the solid cast (I usually enjoy Tom Hardy) and the rave reviews, I probably need to give this one another viewing. I mean, it’s cars.

    1. Man, we would not get along. I love both those movies, albeit for wildly different reasons.

    2. There’s a great behind the scenes bit on the cars, and all of the love and attention which went into making them. It’s worth watching:

  4. This remains not only one of my favorite movies of recent years but of all time.

  5. “I just watched Mad Max: Fury Road again last week, and I tell you I couldn’t direct 30 seconds of that. I’d put a gun in my mouth. I don’t understand how [George Miller] does that, I really don’t, and it’s my job to understand it. I don’t understand two things: I don’t understand how they’re not still shooting that film and I don’t understand how hundreds of people aren’t dead.”
    – Steven Soderbergh

    1. I saw an interview with one of the motorbike stunt riders who was rather apprehensive about doing the riding without any protective gear or helmet. Presumably they did a lot of rehearsal!

      “Amateurs rehearse until they get it right, professionals rehearse until they can’t get it wrong”

      1. Huh, that’s different than the saying we have in shipbuilding: “Amateurs built the Ark, but it took professionals to build Titanic.”

  6. It wasn’t that hard – they just had to film the arrival of the guests at the Dalby B & S ball / Ute muster.

  7. It wasn’t that hard – they just had to film the arrival of the guests at the Dalby B & S ball / Ute muster.

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