Last Call: Another monster mashup

Honestly, I should just stop being surprised that things like this exist. Today I give you the 2JZ swapped Rolls Royce Phantom. Apparently, the owner drove the Rolls so much the engine gave out and he decided to swap it out for the 2JZ, because, Japan. I don’t even know how to feel about this, I think if I saw this on the road I’d think nice, a Phantom, and then hear the iconic blowoff valve and be like, Rolls Royce Supra? My head would be spinning trying to logically put two and two together.

But hey, appreciate all builds because if the owner thinks it’s rad then that’s all that matters. What are your thoughts on it? Do you dig it or does it make you uneasy? Also, that fourth photo with the SEGA sign in the back is way too cool.

Last Call indicates the end of Hooniverse’s broadcast day. It’s meant to be an open forum for anyone and anything. Thread jacking is not only accepted, it’s encouraged.

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13 responses to “Last Call: Another monster mashup”

  1. Batshitbox Avatar

    Oh yah right sure. You blew up a Rolls Royce motor in 118,000 miles. Uh-huh. Go ahead, pull the other one.

    1. Zentropy Avatar

      Exactly. Someone who’s negligent enough to prematurely wreck a Rolls engine is seriously rolling the dice with a double-blown 2JZ transplant? I give this Toyota mill 5k miles before he throws a rod.

    2. Lokki Avatar

      I lived in Tokyo for a decade, and drove there every day for years. The measurement of engine life in miles or kilometers in Tokyo is simply invalid. The proper measure should be hours. The average speed driven over 9 years is probably 40 KPH or 25 MPH – yeah a metro area of 30M people is that crowded. Stealing a little from Wikipedia here, “ Urban two-way streets are usually zoned at 40 km/h (25 mph) or less. outside of urban areas a limit of 40 km/h (25 mph) or 50 km/h (31 mph) is common.” For highways outside of urban areas a limit of 50 km/h (31 mph) or 60 km/h (37 mph) is common and for undivided expressways have a limit of 70 km/h (43 mph).” Yes, there are a few places where expressway limits are higher, but it’s a good rule of thumb to say that’s it pretty rare except during the middle of the night or outside the major cities to even reach the posted limits most of the time. So, that’s a lot of high-temp low-speed work on that engine. One little personal factoid for perspective is that when I commuted 16 kilometers to work by car on surface streets, my morning drive was interrupted by a traffic signal in what worked out to be an average of ever 400 meters – seriously. I would set truck drivers reading newspapers at the wheel every morning, and everybody did his shaving with an electric razor while at the wheel. Taking the train was in most cases cheaper, faster, and easier – if you didn’t mind standing up the whole way.

      So, if I’ve done this right, 118,000 miles at 25 MPH is 4720 hours – note that is -moving hours- and does not count the time spent stopped idling at signals, etc. If the car had averaged 45 MPH that would equate to 212,400 Miles or 339,840 Kilometers. Frankly, assuming that this car lived its life transiting Tokyo I would speculate that the number of hours runtime would be more like 5200 -5300 including idling time, and I still feel that’s probably conservative.

      For what it’s worth.

    3. Lokki Avatar

      I lived in Tokyo for a decade, and drove there every day for years. The measurement of engine life in miles or kilometers in Tokyo is simply invalid. The proper measure should be hours. The average speed driven over 9 years is probably 40 KPH or 25 MPH or less – yeah a metro area of 30M people is that crowded. Stealing a little from Wikipedia here, “ Urban two-way streets are usually zoned at 40 km/h (25 mph) or less. outside of urban areas a limit of 40 km/h (25 mph) or 50 km/h (31 mph) is common.” For highways outside of urban areas a limit of 50 km/h (31 mph) or 60 km/h (37 mph) is common and for undivided expressways have a limit of 70 km/h (43 mph).” Yes, there are a few places where expressway limits are higher, but it’s a good rule of thumb to say that’s it pretty rare except during the middle of the night or outside the major cities to even reach the posted limits most of the time. So, that’s a lot of high-temp low-speed work on that engine. One little personal factoid for perspective is that when I commuted 16 kilometers to work by car on surface streets, my morning drive was interrupted by a traffic signal in what worked out to be an average of ever 400 meters – seriously. I would see truck drivers reading newspapers at the wheel every morning, and everybody did his shaving with an electric razor while at the wheel. Taking the train was in most cases cheaper, faster, and easier – if you didn’t mind standing up the whole way.

      So, if I’ve done this right, 118,000 miles at 25 MPH is 4720 hours – note that is -moving hours- and does not count the time spent stopped idling at signals, etc. If the car had averaged 45 MPH that would equate to 212,400 Miles or 339,840 Kilometers. Frankly, assuming that this car lived its life transiting Tokyo I would speculate that the number of hours runtime would be more like 5200 -5300 including idling time, and I still feel that’s probably conservative.

      For what it’s worth.

      Edit – apparently I touched the vote button. Did you know that you can downvote your own post? I didn’t know that until I just did it and it seems my choices are to upvote myself or downvote myself – I can’t just forget the whole thing it seems, so if I must love or hate myself, well… in any case please excuse my breach of etiquette.

  2. Maymar Avatar

    Should’ve just bought a Toyota Century.

    Mind you, the Phantom is also a bit of a monstrosity, so not much would ruin it really. Hell, throw a wheezing 305 in it and it’s fine.

    1. neight428 Avatar

      In Japan, the 2JZ is like a 5.3 truck motor right?

  3. Sjalabais Avatar

    I don’t have any objections to the build, but this story just reflects poorly on everyone…a modern engine nixed before 200k kms? Rolls-Royce did officially respond that would be a two year wait? “Not amused”, I suppose.

    1. neight428 Avatar

      If you have a Rolls, I think you’re expected to just get another one way before anything could plausibly go wrong. The notion that you would bother replacing a major component of the vehicle would be like asking for a heart transplant on your race horse. Sure, you could do it, but it probably won’t work and misses the point anyway.

      1. Sjalabais Avatar

        See, that’s what bothers me. I’m with Maymar; I’d rather go for a Century V12 with broken window gears than a Rolls-Royce V12 with a broken engine…

  4. wunno sev Avatar

    recall that this is a BMW V12. don’t think you’ll find a lot of 750s hitting 118 kilomiles without a calamity or two along the way.

    1. neight428 Avatar

      Anything with a V12 and factory air (hydropneumatic?) suspension that makes it past 50k miles has to be rare. Looks like he had to take care of both of those fatal flaws.

      1. Rover 1 Avatar

        Air suspension on the Goodwood Rolls Royces, hydropneumatic on the earlier, Crewe built cars starting with the Silver Shadow and derivatives. Using actual Citroën parts no less.

        You’d have thought that Citroën might have made something of the fact that the only other makers that used their hydropneumatic suspension design were Rolls Royce, Bentley, Mercedes Benz, Maserati and Peugeot and that they used actual Citroen parts, eg:; my Mercedes Benz S124 has the same suspension spheres for it’s self levelling suspension as my Citroën BX.

        But apparently they didn’t realise the value of what they had, just the cost.

        S124 rear suspension
        https://mbworld.org/forums/attachments/e-class-w210/295397d1411297688-e320-wagon-rear-suspension-riding-hard-suggestions-imgp5235.jpg

      2. wunno sev Avatar

        supposedly the Lambo V12 is pretty stout, and MBZ M120 V12s are pretty durable. the cars both of those V12s are installed in…… aren’t.

        i don’t think BMW has ever made an engine that’s both exciting and not brimming with catastrophic flaws waiting to emerge. maybe the N54, which has water and fuel pump issues but solid guts.

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