Hooniverse Couldawouldashoulda Weekend – For the Price of a Chevy Colorado You Could Have This Chevy Cheyenne!


Continuing on with our special Hooniverse Couldawouldashoulda Weekend Edition, with your drunk host, UDMan. Pickup trucks were once owned by people who use them for their hauling ability, their utility, or just to be different. Then the compact pickup came to market, and suddenly its a lifestyle vehicle. There is no denying that a pickup is useful, and one of the last of the compact vehicles available is the Chevrolet Colorado. This was actually designed by Isuzu, and built here in the US with either a 2.9L DOHC 4-cylinder, or a 3.7L DOHC 5-cylinder engine, neither of which generates enough power to get out of its own way, and they are not particularly frugal when it comes to fuel mileage. When optioning up a 5-Cylinder Colorado Two-Wheel Drive LT, with an Automatic and not much else, the sticker price hovers around $21,500. For that same amount of money, you could get a real truck in the form of a 1972 Chevrolet C10 Cheyenne Pickup, sporting a 350 CID V-8, a Turbohydramatic, and Air Conditioning. So, which would you choose?


The Colorado has never been well received when it was introduced, taking the place of the long-in-tooth Chevy S-10 in 2004. One of the biggest complaints was the fact that the 4.3L V-6 was replaced with the anemic 3.7L Five that is in no way a torque monster, making only 242 HP at an unusually high 5600 RPM, and only 242 Lb-Ft of torque. The General also cheapened the interior and the exterior with substandard plastic, trim, and other bits. This is a truck that was built to a price…. and it suffers for it.

On the other hand, there is a real Chevrolet Truck that comes with a Full Metal Dash, a Steering Wheel that could be used in a Semi, and an honest to god Bench Seat covered in good old embossed vinyl. This truck is painted in the most eye searing red, tempered with an old fashioned white two-tone treatment. And under the hood is an honest to god Chevy Small Block. According to the listing:

1972 Chevrolet C10 Cheyenne Pick-up, 62,000 miles, amazing rust free western truck, absolutely gorgeous Red and White two-tone paint, excellent Red and Black interior, brilliant chrome and trim, 350 cu in V8, automatic, poser steering, power disc brakes, cold A/C, dual exhaust, tilt steering column, AM radio, cargo light, Chevy Truck Rally wheels, white wall radial tires, chrome step & tow rear bumper, drives beautifully!


The question is this: For roughly $21,500, you could get a well equipped Colorado Pickup 2WD, and be perfectly satisified with using it day to day while it drives you to an early grave with its lack of PAH and lack of hauling ability, or you could get a pickup that was intended to pull a trailer, or live on a cattle ranch in the west end of Texas. Why you could get your own Cowboy Hat, and Texas sized belt buckle for your Wranglers, and be perfectly at home in this Cheyenne. Which would you choose? See the Cheyenne Listing here.

0 Comments

    1. I wondered the same thing about 6 years ago when I was pickup shopping. I was looking at American-brand extended cab 4×4's and the then-brand-new '05 Dakota got my vote but I liked the already-elderly Ranger better than the also-brand-new Colorado.

  1. The Colorado is a crappy truck, period. For $21,235 MSRP, you can get a base 2WD Silverado which also has auto and A/C standard. In fact, with current incentives, you can load up that Silverado with a decent amount of options and still not break the $21,500 price.
    I do like that 1972. It's really good-looking and it's got some nice options like the A/C and the gauge package. The "woodgrain" on the dash looks aftermarket and it detracts from the interior. The asking price just seems too high, though. It's interesting that the ad says "poser steering". Freudian slip? I'd take the '72 over the Colorado (even knowing I'd been ripped off a bit) but not over the Silverado.

    1. I was going to page you to the Hooniversal Blue Courtesy BatPhone, but I should have known you'd smell a C10 like a shark smells blood in the water!

  2. I may lose a bit o' the old hoon cred here, but I'd definitely take the Colorado. It'd break my heart to watch the 72 rust to pieces in the six months it would take.
    Oh, and with a blistering net HP number of 200 for the 72, that whole PAH thing kinda turns around, doesn't it? (Per Wiki, fwiw.)

    1. I'll take my chances with the rust. They don't make enough body filler to cover up the blah of that Colorado. Besides, you can take certain precautions to prevent rust. I know a certain Hooniverse commenter that has a truck that has been through at least ten Michigan winters, and still looks pretty good for being 90% original. 😉
      <img src="http://www.flickr.com/photos/citroen67s_pix/5641175344/&quot; title="P4144630 by RatRodRamDodge, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5301/5641175344_46cddfe293.jpg&quot; width="500" height="375" alt="P4144630">

  3. Tonyola has the right idea. The C10 is nice, but I wouldn't pay $21K for a 40 y/o truck. I'd say half of that, tops. You can never be sure of how well it was restored, what shortcuts were taken and what it will need later on. Plus, if you'll truly use it as a truck, anything newer will do the job better. A Silverado is the better idea.

  4. Man I love that truck!
    But what the hell is that other thing?
    I still can't wrap my head around these old pickups selling for significantly more than their original price though. I know it makes sense, they are getting old, survivors are rare and restorations cost money, but still… I still view old pickups as just old pickups that deserve old pickup prices, no matter how awesome they are. This is way beyond the price of several GTOs and T-Types I've drooled over recently.
    Guess I'm just an old cheap bastard.

  5. What the world needs now is a decent new little Ranger. Or the basic Toyota pickup of yore. The big advantage of the old full size pickups was the full size bed. Hard to find that anywhere now, for love or money.

    1. This particular C10 looks to have the long bed. These pickups were available in three bed lengths, including a 115-in. wheelbase shortie in both stepside and fleetside models. I drove a 1970 shortie 4WD stepside for a couple of years and the truck was fairly compact with 188 inches overall length.
      <img src="https://webspace.utexas.edu/burl/www/truck.jpg&quot; width=400>

  6. I have a '72 GMC Custom, can fill the bed with 4X8 plywood laying flat. It gets really crappy fuel economy, but when people see it coming down the road they get outta my way ("this guy looks like he's got NOTHING to loose")

  7. I think I'm developing a man crush on this Connors guy. He seems to have lots of cool iron to peddle.

  8. If you haven't driven a regular cab Colorado with the ZQ8 sport package, you have no idea how much fun they can be to drive. Unfortunately GM wasn't making enough money on the regular cab trucks, so now you can't get them with all the options you can on the extended and crew cab trucks.
    A regular cab with the 4cyl weighs 3120lbs and has 177hp, that's 100lbs more than a 2011 GTI and 23hp less, not too far off. But you can't put a dirt bike in the back of a GTI, and mine has the 5cyl and 5 speed stick, plus the sport package because I bought it in 2005 when you could get them built that way.
    I've driven old cars and trucks, and I like them, but for sitting in day to day traffic give me AC and a modern engineered cooling system and disc brakes.

  9. 5 bolt wheels should indicate disc brakes on this model, I think. And, that old A-6 compressor should make plenty of frosty air. I wonder how close a late model cloth seat would fit? I love the pattern on that big, bench seat, but the vinyl bondage issues, not so much.

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