For Sale: My old Ford F100 is available and you should buy it!

I think about my old 1965 Ford F100 a fair bit. That was a great truck, and I learned a lot more about working on cars because of it. Especially when Hooniverse co-founder Tim Odell and I pulled the engine, swapped in a fresh cam, did the valve seals, and welded up a new exhaust system. We also replaced the clutch. It was a busy weekend. But soon after, I had to make some space for a vehicle that made more sense for a growing family… and for me, that was my 1974 W114 Benz. We’re now a few cars removed from both of those, yet I still think about my truck. But you could own that truck because the person I sold it to is ready to move on from it. The HoonTruck is for sale!

The current owner has done some work on the truck. In fact, he had to replace the entire engine because the old block was pretty tired. Now there’s a fresh 352 crate engine in the nose with less than 1,000 miles on it. The owner also cleaned up the various rust holes with POR15 and popped on a new tailgate. Inside, the carpet looks great and the rest of the truck is as rad as I remember it.

It still has the Clarion sound system, Magnaflow exhaust, and wheel and tire setup from when I sold it. Now it just has no more holes and a fresh mill. If the seller were to hold on to the truck, he’d spray on a bedliner in the back and clean up more of the bodywork. Other than that, this thing is ready to rock and is in better shape compared to when I owned it.

The seller gave me the first right of refusal, which I really appreciate. Unfortunately, my garage space is tight at the moment and I don’t have the funds to plop down on another vehicle. Otherwise, this thing would be coming back to live with me because I really did love this truck. I can picture myself tossing my mountain bike in the back and heading off to the trailhead in this old beast. But I’m not going to do that…

so one of you should snatch this up. You can reach the owner/seller via:

And if you want a more direct intro, I’d be happy to do so for you and the seller. Email me at Jeff@Hooniverse.com.

8 Comments

  1. I doubt any of us could afford to own that Jeff. I’m sure the markup from being owned by a world rewound blooger would add literally thrive’s of dollars to the price.

  2. I’m particularly impressed by the new crate engine. That’s some commitment reflecting trust in the rest of the vehicle to be “worthy” of a new heart.

  3. I didn’t know anyone builds 352 crate engines. Maybe rebuilding a numbers-matching block, sure. But if you’re going to buy something ready to drop in, there’s no replacement for displacement–you can pay the same price for a 390. Or retrofit something from another engine family.

    I’ll have to take your word that it’s in better shape now than when you owned it. It looks like it slipped, cosmetically, particularly all that black tar everywhere.

    1. I doubt that numbers matching is a concern here. Not because it’s not worthy but because I don’t think Ford tracked VINs and engine numbers then. I know that’s the case with my 1960 Thunderbird. You can see if the casting dates on the block and heads are before the engine build date and if that’s before the vehicle assembly date. If so, it’s probably the original engine, but not guaranteed.

      A 390 and a 352 are visually identical. I think the only way to tell is to pull a plug and measure the stroke. The torque difference between the two is significant, hopefully it’s a 390.

      By the dates, I think the engine in my Thunderbird is original. It’s tired, though, with I think 153K on it. I’ve been toying with a rebuild because I like the idea of originally, or swapping in a 390. For now, I’m going to try to keep it running and enjoy it.

      1. Yes. My point is that nobody builds “crate” 352 engines because they know that someone wanting something from a crate would get more bang for the buck with an identical 390. The only real reason to get a 352 is to retain numbers-matching parts, but then that would be a rebuild and not a “crate”.

    2. Honestly, it’s probably a 390 with the 352 stampings on the block. Every old Ford with a 390, seems like the owner thinks its a 352.

      1. The block castings are identical on the outside and they both say 352 on them. The core is different, however, so they have similar cylinder wall thicknesses. I looked at boring my 352 out to make it a 390, but that would put the cylinder walls right at their minimum thickness.

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