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Watch this gorgeous documentary on the Isle of Man TT

It’s wild that the race continues on to this day…

The Isle of Man TT race is an amazing event. I was fortunate to attend once a few years back and, even as someone who doesn’t care much more motorcycles, was blown away. The speed. The focus. The dedication and passion of the fans. And the chance that someone pushing themselves and their machine to the limit will meet a tragic end… it’s an awe-inspiring race.

Studiokippenberger has prepared a beautifully shot 18-minute documentary covering the race. Through the eyes of those that race there, the film covers a bit of the “why” of the TT. 

Black and white interview pieces are cut around absolutely gorgeous footage of both the race itself and a general riding bit that is itself a joy to watch.

Find 18 minutes to yourself and give this one a watch.

Buy this Wolf in fancy Wolf clothing: 1990 Mercedes-Benz Wolf 250GD for sale

Getting to retire well after a life of military service is a dream we wish more service members could enjoy. My own father did 20 years in the Navy and now has a normal gig that pairs well with his government and state (from another post-Navy gig) pensions. Post military life can be done better though, as this 1990 Mercedes-Benz Wolf 250GD proves.

When a G-Class is built and slated for military work, it’s called a Wolf. That’s a much cooler name than any G-number number AMG blah blah. This specific vehicle did its time in Afghanistan alongside the German military before getting its discharge papers and winding up with a dealer in New Jersey.

Last Call- G-Class Class Picture Edition

Once there, the 250GD received a full restoration. Which is funny to hear, considering the vehicle only shows 9,000 miles on its odometer. But military work is hard and this G-Class is getting a new life that it deserves. That includes a full body-off restoration, gorgeous new blue paint, a pair of custom tops, BFGoodrich tires, upgraded steering bits, and plenty of upgrades to make it both a beastie off road and a joy around town.

This Wolf is listed over on Bring-A-Trailer, where (at the time of this writing) sits with a current bid of $37,000 and six days remaining before its sold. The BAT crew have sold a Wolf a number of times, with one selling in November for $46,500. The one seen here has way less miles and a far nicer restoration job.

It’s going to fetch a strong amount of cash. And it should, because it’s wonderful.

Truck Thursday Hooniverse Asks: What’s your favorite factory off-road pickup?

Jeff Glucker August 9, 2018 Hooniverse Asks

Ford is currently the off-road truck king with its F-150 Raptor. Toyota has an entire family of TRD Pro trucks (and an SUV) at the ready, and for 2019 they get fancy new Fox shocks. Chevy has its Colorado ZR2 and Ram lets loose with a Rebel yell. I’m incredibly curious to sample a new Ranger Raptor, and the Jeep Wrangler truck will undoubtedly be quite awesome.

Of all the options out there in this space, which one is your favorite? I love the Raptor… it’s a truck I absolutely do not need, yet I would be very happy to have one waiting in my driveway.

Which one would you call your own if you had the funds and were shopping for such a beast?

Here are some facts about the Borg-Warner trophy

Jeff Glucker August 9, 2018 All Things Hoon

When you win the Indianapolis 500, you’re given the Borg-Warner trophy. Well, you don’t get the actual trophy because it’s incredibly valuable and also rather massive. Instead, you get a smaller replica of the trophy a few months after the race has been won. You also get your face on the trophy.

Here are a few other bits of information about this trophy:

  • Right now, the trophy has 104 faces adorning its sides. Will Power’s mug will be added soon. 
  • Winners from 12 countries and 21 US states are represented on the trophy.
  • Louis Meyer was the first person added to the trophy. He won his third Indy 500 in 1936.
  • There are two pairs of faces on the trophy, for when the race had co winners.
  • Tom Sneva is the only face on the trophy wearing a pair of glasses, which is something he requested.
  • The youngest driver on the trophy is 22 year old (and 80 days) Troy Ruttman.
  • Al Unser is the older on the trophy at 47 years and 360 days.
  • Johnnie Parsons, who won the race in 1950, has his first name incorrectly spelled as Johnny.
  • The Unser family is on the trophy nine times. Bobby won three times, Al won four times, and Al Jr won twice.

My favorite Borg-Warner trophy story comes from the 1930s though, as a university student was tasked with watching the trophy the night before the race. He placed it under his bed and then went out drinking. When he returned to his fraternity house, the trophy wasn’t there. Panicked, he ran down to the basement and found his fraternity brothers drinking beer out of the trophy. It fit 115 beers inside of it. To remove the smell of the beer, the student showered with the trophy.

2018 Chevrolet Camaro ZL1
American muscle that out “sports” more expensive rides

Chevrolet has really crushed it with the 6th-generation Camaro. The chassis is brilliant, the engine note is downright delicious, and the performance is world class… and that’s just on a regular old SS. Step up to the 650-horsepower Camaro ZL1 and it’s a whole different ballgame.

Under the hood is the supercharged LT4 and it’s paired with either a six-speed manual or the ten-speed automatic found on our test car. This auto box is far better than the eight-speed used elsewhere in the GM lineup.

Amazingly, this isn’t even the craziest Camaro you can buy. With the ZL1, you can option it out as a ZL1 1LE. That swaps the magnetic ride for spool valve-dampened suspension, smaller wheels with wider tires, and enough aero to force the car into the ground when pushed aggressively.

If you want one of the most capable bang-for-the-buck cars out there, the Camaro ZL1 should be on your shopping list. It’s not cheap, priced over $60,000, but it will decimate the egos and lap times of those with far more expensive machinery.

[Disclaimer: Chevy tossed us the keys to the ZL1 and included a tank of fuel.]

Centuries old craftsmanship brings Aston Martin badges to life

Jeff Glucker August 8, 2018 All Things Hoon

Do you ever stop to consider where some of the parts of your car come from? You might know where an engine is built. The transmission can be easily traced. But do you care who builds the badges that adorn the nose or tail of your car? You might if you’re shuttling an Aston Martin around. And you certainly should because the AM wings are produced by a company that was formed back in 1819, and continues to crank them out precious works of metallic art to this day.

Road & Track took a trip to Vaughntons. It’s the Birmingham-based shop where an Aston Martin gets its wings. These iconic badges are formed through a series of pressings and heat cycles before being handed over to a team of talented painters.

Newport Pagnell Keeps Aston Martin’s Heritage Alive

I remember a trip to Gaydon, which is the home of Aston Martin today, and it’s where the folks from the Q team talked lovingly about their favorite customer-requested items. Many of those are the badges themselves, and Q works to make unusual and unique happen. But really it’s the team at Vaughntons that turns a thought or design into something you can hold in your hand, before it adorns the face of an amazing automobile.

One of my favorites of which they spoke? The customer that wanted scarab beetle wings ground up and used to create a special green jewel-like paint scheme for the wings. Aston Martin had them created, and they’re never going to do it for another customer.

Read more about Vaughtons and their dedication to their craft over at R&T.

[Source: Road & Track]

Watch a monstrously modified BMW E30 M3 tackle this hill climb course

If the LS isn’t the answer to your power problems, it has to be the 2JZ. Toyota’s inline six-cylinder beauty is a 3.0-liter delight, especially when served up in the twin-turbocharged GTE flavor. Left stock, it has solid power numbers of around 270+ horsepower and well over 300 pound-feet of torque. When tuned, however, the sky (and your credit card) is the limit. Case in point? Exhibit B M W posted above.

The car is a BMW E30 M3 and it’s packing 2JZ heat under its hood. Hillclimb Monsters captured the car racing up the hill during the Osnabruck race weekend. The result was first place overall, and that was accomplished thanks to Vidar Jodahl’s driving skill and his monstrous engine.

Heavily modified, this 2JZ-GTE now produces 1,306 hp and well over 1,000 lb-ft of torque. The noise is amazing. The power is corrupting. The car is truly awesome.

[Source: HillClimb Monsters – YouTube]

A mini Miura tribute car is almost more fascinating than the real thing

This isn’t the car that inspired the Circuit Wolf manga. This isn’t the one-off Lamborghini Miura built by a mad man in Germany and then transported to Japan. This isn’t that special Miura that was recently restored by Lamborghini’s in-house restoration team. What it is, however, is something that you just might find to be a bit more interesting. This is a Suzuki Cara modified as a tribute machine paying homage to that amazing Miura.

Ken Saito, Jalopnik’s resident Car Nerd in Japan, got an up close look at this wonderful little machine. The Suzuki Cara, which is basically a badge-engineered Mazda Autozam AZ-1, is a gullwinged kei car that’s special in its own right. But this one has been transformed into something downright magical.

The owner clearly has lots of love for the special Lamborghini Miura Jota SVR. So much so, that he’s turned his Cara into a proper tribute machine. The color scheme matches, as does the spoiler on the roof. Inside, you’ll find Lamborghini belts and a steering wheel. Head back outside and check out the Bertone badges on the b-pillar. The details are excellent and everywhere.

You need to wander over to Jalopnik to learn more about this car. Ken has a number of fantastic photos, so you can examine the Cara from all angles.

[Source: Jalopnik]

Hooniverse Asks: How serious are you about washing your car?

Jeff Glucker August 8, 2018 Hooniverse Asks

I don’t mind washing my car. But I’m not obsessed with doing so. Usually, I’ll head over to the local spray booth and wash the car myself. Occasionally, I’ll hang a hose over the side of my patio wall and wash the car right outside of my garage. I’m always looking for things to make my life easier with respect to car cleaning though, because I’m a bit lazy and I like to find shortcuts.

My friend Larry Kosilla is the opposite. He’s the best kind of mental person. As the owner of Ammo NYC car washing products, Larry shares his car cleaning and detailing skills on his own YouTube channel. There you can see Larry explaining all sorts of car cleaning skills while he also works on all kinds of cars. 

You should spend the time when you have it to watch Larry and a team of detailers get a McLaren F1 GTR Longtail.

How do you approach your car cleaning regime? Do you just run it through an automated stall? Do you break out the toothbrushes and scour for every spec of dirt? Or do you feel that dirt is a naturally protectant against rust?

Sound off below!

I would daily drive the shit out of this…
1970 Mercury Montego Edition

While everyone at Bring-A-Trailer is arguing about obscure blinker light location in a post about an auction for some old Porsche I don’t care about, I find myself drooling over this heap of crap. What you’re looking at is a 1970 Mercury Montego and it was thoroughly tarted up to serve as a promotional vehicle for former NASCAR driver David Pearson.

The 1960 Rookie of the Year, Pearson drove for Holman-Moody for a handful of seasons when NASCAR was the Grand National Series. This Montego was built by a Virginian car dealer where it roamed East Coast NASCAR races and probably looked a lot prettier back in its heyday.

But today could once again be its heyday.

There’s no reserve posted for the listing, which means you could potentially scoop this one up on the cheap. Under the hood is a 351 that shows just 50,919 miles of wear. You also have A/C, power steering, and some spare parts as well. The interior will need a bit of love, but the outside is perfect. Especially because it would likely offend everyone on the highways of California as I rolled on past.

This one won’t do well on BAT. It’s not the place to sell a car like this, unless the seller just wants its out of their site. One of you should step in and grab this one, and be the hero this website deserves.

[Source: Bring-A-Trailer]