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Which car is the perfect Yacht Rock car?

Cars and rock music are inseparably linked. From the cars’ inception on drawing boards where music easily helps you visualize a new car’s shape and form and purpose, to the marketing material where the car hits a floodlit stage or a sweeping road, to actually using the finished car for a quality time while blasting quality tunes – either as new, or 30 years since it first rolled off the lot.

And there are various genres to consider: punk rock when you just want to beat on the BRAT, hard, garage born rock when it’s a rattlecanned hulk laying down sweet rubber, or classic rock’n’roll to really suit a pastel Chevy that’s destined for a night out on the diner parking lot. Or then it’s all about dusty, dirty trucks, Budweiser and Bob Seger. But still, there’s one specific style of smooth music that perfectly fits some 30-40-year old cars, absolutely unparalleled from my point of view.

Yacht Rock.

The entire discussion I’ve been having with some fellow music/car nerds is based on a love of smooth, expensively made late 1970s-early 1980s AOR music, often linked to yachting in SoCal due to its image. Countless overdubs to get everything right. State of the art equipment, for the crispest sound. Seasoned studio hands brought in for just the shortest contributions, yet days, weeks, months, years spent honing the albums to flawless perfection. It’s all about expensive sound that only guitarists like Mark Knopfler could achieve in those proto-yuppie or full-on-yuppie days. But what are the cars that really seamlessly fit this kind of soundtrack?

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Frozen Wastes Weekend Edition: Opel Omega 3000

On the other side of the town from the Bonneville-hosting junkyard, I found this black Opel Omega. A-body Omegas have been vanishing for a long time, as the B-bodies have fared better – though not without their share of rusty body panels. This wasn’t even a completely ordinary Omega, but a high-spec Omega 3000, meaning that it came with a three-liter straight six.

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Frozen Wastes Weekend Edition: Pontiac Bonneville SSE

I took the Polo out today for a drive around the industrial districts. Snow had fallen a couple days ago, mercifully covering much of all the beaten and broken cars strewn around the junkyards. But as I turned the corner and saw this Pontiac Bonneville, I felt like I had hit the jackpot when it comes to finding something rare and rough. This was a complete goner.

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Light Green Light Resto: 1971 Toyota Corona Mark II

Driving through an industrial district earlier today, I spotted this light green Toyota Corona Mark II. It seemed to be a bit of a project, but available information told me it was actually road legal last week, likely needing a little fettling to pass inspection. That’s most likely why it was parked next to a shop.

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Project VW Polo 86c Classic: Bluemotion, but when?

As it is my white 1986 Volkswagen Polo that most readily drives me to writing, I was in luck to find this earlier example on an inspection station forecourt today. Well, there are also multiple dealers nearby and a carwash, but I think it’s the yearly roadworthiness inspection that has been the closest eminence for this humble blue two-door saloon. The plates are gone, and the car looks like a future project, one that has sat for a while. Funnily enough, at the very station I struck a deal on mine.

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Back on track: the 60 Euro Polo slides again

Out of all the varied cars in my fleet, it is with the 1986 Volkswagen Polo Classic I feel the strongest kinship. I’ve often said I like a good underdog car, and what better demonstration of that than a literally rescued car I bought for less than a tank of fuel? Obviously it came with a ton of issues, but it had been so sparingly used I saw great potential in its bare-bones appearance.

We’re talking about a 725kg two-door saloon with 54 factory horsepower, a four-speed manual, a 99% rust free body and an enormous trunk, complete with early-1980s minimalistic Volkswagen design. I had to have it, I grabbed it, I wrenched on it, I let it sit, I admitted nothing was going to happen to it if I didn’t take it to a shop, I took it to a shop, I bought a very expensive carburetor for it, they put it on wrong and adjusted it wrong, and then I got it back. This is where we probably left off in the tale of a man’s slow descent into project car hell the #60EuroPolo and how it regained its funky Wolfsburg mojo.

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Shower Thoughts: What if there was an American Opel Vectra?

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This past weekend I noticed a first generation Opel Vectra parked on a side street. Their numbers are dwindling, as is the fate of a long-unremarkable car that doesn’t really have an enthusiast following. Sure, there have been Vectra hobbyists, but that has often been a result of an everyday hand-me-down car receiving sound systems and fiberglass add-ons and a dodgy paint job; after a Vectra has lost its new-car value, it hasn’t been anything for anyone to really pine for, as a dream car. The Calibra coupe versions are more exciting looking, and have a future as enthusiast cars; Vectras will slowly continue to disappear, like Asconas have.

But that’s past the point I was going to make. What if the Vectra had been available in the USA? In 1988, it was a hot offering after the C-generation Ascona bowed; that car, a J-body was available in the States in numerous guises from the Cavalier to the Cimarron. Ford tried to market its German/UK-derived Vectra competitors in the States with little success; the Sierra was rebranded as the Merkur XR4ti which was too weird and pseudo-posh to succeed, especially with the 2.3 turbo unit. The Mondeo was reborn as the Contour and the Mystique, which were too cramped in the back to catch buyers. Would the Vectra have fared similarly?

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Thanksgiving Turkey: My 1992 Peugeot 405 Mi16

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How’s this for a thanksgiving turkey? The Peugeot 405 Mi16 I bought a year ago is still in bits, still unfinished – and now with lapsed MOT. Remember the scene in Money Pit where Tom Hanks has no other choice than to laugh at the gaping hole on the floor where his bathtub once was? Why do I mention that scene? No reason, really…

As we speak, there isn’t a Flintstones-style hole in the Mi16’s bottom, and it’s not likely that there ever has been. But in the past year, I’ve had to shell out money to replace most everything between the licence plates – which I’ve also replaced some time ago. It’s not going to be a complete restoration, but it’s not far from one, either.

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For Sale: 23,000-mile ’82 Austin Ambassador looks factory fresh

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The 1982-1984 Austin Ambassador was the last iteration of what was once the Austin Princess, or just the Princess, or the 18-22 series, or the Raymond Luxury-Yacht. Or something like that. In any case, by 1982 the Ambassador was woefully dated despite finally featuring the one thing it should have had from new – a hatchback.

This 1.7-litre car is from the Ambassador’s launch year, and the nameplate survived only til March of 1984, succeeded by the Montego. It’s only done a piffling 23,000 miles from new, and it will be offered up to be auctioned on October 22nd by Roxby Garage in North Yorkshire.

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Weekend Edition Brochure Scan: Lamborghini Diablo

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Hey, it’s not only Chris “Carchive” Haining who hoards old automotive brochures here. I am more than happy to let him do the most of the work on that front, since scanning these is a bit of a pain, but here is an exception: the pre-facelift Lamborghini Diablo in brochure form. I just have to hand it over to you, our dear readers, for a look.

I often visit the next town over as they have some outstandingly good flea markets there, as well as some places that make a decent burger and a number of really nice cafes. I’ve started buying old vinyl albums, and after having scored a stack of finds such as a Todd Rundgren compilation and the Fire and Ice theme tune in 12″ single form, I ran into this great-condition Lamborghini brochure. It shows the pre-facelift car, but it’s not the earliest possible edition as there is mention of the 1993-unveiled 4WD VT version.

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