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Project Car SOTU: The Integra GS-R

Kamil Kaluski August 14, 2017 Featured, Project Car SOTU, Project Cars 5 Comments

In October 2015 the Integra looked and ran perfectly. It was freshly detailed, which included wet-sanding and headlight clearing. The engine was serviced; new plugs, fuel filter, valve adjustment,  cold-air intake with a new filter. It ran strong and it ran well.

Then I parked it temporarily in my friend’s huge garage. And I haven’t driven it since. I didn’t mean for that to happen. The access to it wasn’t always easy. I didn’t always have the time. And the time just flew by. But last week I did spend some time with it…

After not being started for 18-months or so, charging what was a relatively new battery took a while. I checked the oil and it was clean and full. I disconnected the ignition and turned the engine over a few times. Then I connected the dizzy back and it started right up. It ran a bit rough at first but then it settled to a nice and even idle.

And then I noticed a scent of scent of burning oil and some oil smoke by the exhaust manifold, near the dip-stick area. Ugh. I don’t know if it’s sipping through the head gasket or there was a spill there or what. There is nowhere else it could come from. But the engine felt solid. I didn’t have the time to investigate further.

The worn Hoosiers were almost flat. The clean body was dusty despite the car cover and climate controlled garage. The interior was clean and it smelled like it did in 1995. Most importantly, no new rodent residents made a home in it.

 

I have a personal attachment to third generation Integras. If I have to explain why that is, than it’s likely that you won’t understand. You can read about my red ’94 GS-R here and about how I acquired this black ’95 GS-R here.

But I think the time has come to move on with this car. I spent more money on it than I ever intended to; suspension, fuel system, rust issues, exhaust. Mechanically everything is perfect and done right. Almost perfect, because nothing is ever perfect. ABS module isn’t working. I didn’t touch the brakes. Speakers are blown. Perfect otherwise.

So now what? Wait until I sell my city condo and buy a house in the burbs, and then bring it home? That was supposed to happen three years ago. Sell it to some pimple-faced kid who will mod it and wreck it, at a huge loss?

I don’t know…

Current modifications and updates:

  • Tein adjustable coil-over suspesion
  • Type R front sway bar
  • Comp Tech rear sway bar and support bracket
  • 16×7 SSR Competition wheels.
  • 205/45-16 Hoosier rain tires
  • Every bushing, nut, and bolt in the suspension is new. Some polyurethane bushings, some OEM rubber. 
  • New steel brake and fuel lines (they were replaced previously but it was a hack job) 
  • New engine and transmission mounts, shifter bushings
  • OEM JDM ITR header (google it, 2.5″ collector vs stock 2.25″) with OEM heat-shields, high-flow car, new mid pipe, and OEM ITR muffler. 
  • Comp Tech cold air intake. 

  • Keep it. You’ll never find the same combination of subtle mods and good condition for the price you’re carrying it at now: zero.

    • outback_ute

      Agreed, if you don’t need to sell it, don’t. But you probably shouldn’t listen to me…

    • Andrew_theS2kBore

      Agreed. You won’t get enough money for it now to offset the regret later. Take it out in the backroads or to the track, before the weather gets cold, to remind yourself exactly why.

    • Alff

      That’s probably true, but it is wearing to have a car or cars that you don’t have the time to enjoy. At some point it becomes more liability than asset. I have at least one car that falls into that category. Kamil has an advantage in that this one is more or less market ready.

  • John Goreham

    I love that car.