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Hooniversal Opinion – 2017 New York International Auto Show

One of America’s largest annual auto shows is kicking off this week, so as is tradition, this is the part where most of your regular Hooniverse contributors get together and discuss the new cars making their debut here.

The New York International Auto Show is setting a stage for nearly two dozen new cars to make their world or North American debuts so there’s plenty to talk about, as has been covered in the news throughout the week and the usual [mostly] factual recap that will follow this. For this bit though, we’re changing things up a little by only talking about the ten most important and/or interesting new cars on display.

The valuable opinions of nearly a dozen hoons, two of which were actually at the show, are all past the jump. Some of us were nice and some were a little… harsh, and I bet you can guess who. Be sure to chime in for yourself and stay tuned for the news later today.

2018 Dodge Challenger SRT Demon

Dodge’s most potent muscle car ever is the 840-hp, 2.3-second to 60 mph, sub ten-second quarter mile Challenger SRT Demon. It’s the most drag racing-focused yet street legal car you can buy. And yes… that’s really how it was displayed.

[Image © 2017 Hooniverse/Ross Ballot]

 

Annoying marketing campaign aside, I dig this. It’s got more power than anyone would ever need and it’s probably only useful at the drag strip, but the numbers behind it and the old school badassery are just too cool to not love. I don’t like how it isn’t NHRA legal though and I especially don’t like how Dodge is spinning this. “It’s because it’s too fast!”, Dodge and owners with self esteem issues will tell you; the truth is it’s just not safe enough for how fast it goes. I have a feeling this is going to be crashed a lot.

Greg Kachadurian

 

Well it is finally here, its not like we haven’t known it has been coming with all the teasers. But its cool, the launch was cool and having Vin Diesel as an ambassador is a nice get. The numbers are impressive and it looks damn good, shame we may not ever see one in Australia.

Joel Strickland

 

Just like everything else Dodge is doing these days, the Demon is as absurd and over-the-top as the presentation it was released at. They’re making bold claims as to its performance capabilities, but I’m happy that it exists if for no reason other than “why the hell not?” It looks properly mean in person, especially with the skinnies up front, and has a presence about it unlike any other car I’ve seen in a long while. Can’t wait to see what they’re capable of in owners’ hands, and when the aftermarket puts its touches on them.

-Ross Ballot

 

I love the fact that they had to balls to make this. Buying it is a better long term investment than the stock market.

Kamil Kaluski

 

It’s a hilariously fun machine that should be priced smartly enough to be kept out of the hands of most young, dumb hooligans (aka those like me). It’s crazy that a car company has built a machine like this. I think this may just mark the peak of the horsepower wars, and now it’s officially time to enter the Lightness Wars phase of performance automotive research, design, and production.

Jeff

 

I guess I have to be the contrarian here. I really hate this. Nobody has any business doing wheelies and running 8s in the quarter anywhere but a drag strip. Oh, and this can’t actually run at the drag strip without a cage, because that’s unsafe. So why would it be safe on the street? People gonna die, y’all. And one seat? Can Dodge think of any bigger gimmicks to sell 15 year old Mercedes chassis with giant dumb engines?

-Brad Brownell

 

To answer Bradley’s last question: Yes, there’s at least one (literally) bigger gimmick. See the Jeep Grand Cherokee Trackhawk further down this list. “When all you have is a hammer…”

-Alan Cesar

 

As hard as this may be to believe, I have no strong feelings about the Demon one way or the other. It just is what it is. I have a great deal of trouble relating to this car on any level, not in spite of its calculated outrageousness but because of it. Its capabilities are truly extreme in some areas, yet it is certainly not what you could call a fully rounded performance car. Its excesses, its shortcomings, its low-volume production, and its price tag all add up to a car that might as well not exist for all that it will ever mean to me and my life.

-Peter Tanshanomi

 

One thing I like about the Dodge Demon. It reminds me of Glastonbury when a thrash metal band is playing on some distant stage – it draws in and contains in all the angry teenagers who would otherwise be ruining our calm enjoyment of whatever barely known electro-acoustic act we were endeavouring to listen to. Thirty years ago Dodge was creating things like the M4S concept, which was production ready and did amazing things with a turbo-four. How about creating a body like that with an engine like this? How about coming up with some interesting new ideas rather than just making lots of noise?

-Chris Haining

 

I can’t tell if the reveal and endless teasing is what ruined this car for me, but I just can’t care. I think it embodies everything I hate about the automotive industry. It was overly macho, tacky as hell, and was so perfectly aimed at their demographic. It’s both underwhelming and overwhelming. As impressive as the figures may be, it’s an ancient chassis that I can only cynically think they are milking for every last dollar. Can’t wait to see what one looks like after it ends up in the wrong hands.

Patrick Hoffstetter

 

2017 Honda Civic Si

The performance-minded Civic more people are likely to buy is the new Si. Complete with a 205-horsepower turbo four, a six-speed manual, and understated styling (minus the spoiler), it’s the bargain performance car for the masses.

[Image © 2017 Hooniverse/Ross Ballot]

 

The more I see these new Civics on the road the more the shape is growing on me. Nice specs and a performance model is never a bad thing.

Joel Strickland

 

Kamil and I spent quite a while in the Honda booth going back and forth between the Si and Type R and we decided that although the R will undoubtedly be a riot on the track, both of us prefer the Si. In coupe form it’s a worthy way to keep the model name going forward and, while it won’t have the high-revving freeness of the VTEC engines of the past, the newfound torque should make it better for everyday driving which is the situation in which they’ll be driven most. The shifter felt nice and precise (sitting on the show floor, at least), and the seats were pretty good as well– decent bolstering, but definitely road-trip worthy comfort. Overall it seems like a really good package, and hopefully it drives just as well.

Ross Ballot

 

What Ross said. And it doesn’t look like a boy-racer’s toy. My only issue with it was that it was a little short on headroom. Many casual weekend autocrossers would have a hard time fitting in with a helmet on.

-Kamil Kaluski

 

I’ll test that soon. I’m driving the car in a few weeks, and the launch includes track time. 205 horsepower is probably a sweet spot for a car like this, but I’m sure I’ll be left wanting more simply because I know the Type R exists.

Jeff

 

I have always been a Civic fan, but I just can’t get behind the idea of a turbocharged Si. I’ll give a real opinion once I’ve driven one, but I will remain skeptical until then. I want 8,000 RPM redlines from Honda sport-oriented cars. This Civic is about the size of an Accord.

-Brad Brownell

 

It’s about damn time Honda boosts the (US-market) Civic above 200 horsepower. Despite having made some of the cars most responsible for the hot-compact craze, their Civic has been behind the curve for at least 10 years. I’m glad they’re finally getting up to speed again. Unfortunately, I predict that rear wing is gonna be the butt of a lot of jokes.

-Alan Cesar

 

I see the new Si sedan as a higher performance, more modern, more sophisticated, more mainstream version of what my 6-speed Kizashi aspired to be: a tasteful, grown-up FWD sports sedan for people who know they will spend infinitely more time commuting than canyon-carving. Yes, I could seriously go for this.

-Peter Tanshanomi

 

I’m not sure there has ever been a bad Civic Si, and even the disappointing ones have been solid all-rounders. If anything disappoints me it’s that the Civic seems to have abandoned its bold design voyage into the future in favour of something that couldn’t be more 2017 if it tried.

-Chris Haining

 

I think the new Civics look great and the numbers on this new Si look promising. I just hope it doesn’t lose any of its fun character as so many new sports cars do these days. And yeah, the wing is a bit ugly.

Greg Kachadurian

 

The new perfect first car. Not too powerful, safe as hell, and chock full of all of the tech a youngin craves. I still can’t remember what generation Civic this is for the life of me. This is a nice preview of the future of Honda.

Patrick Hoffstetter

 

Audi R8 LMS GT4

Audi Sport’s latest customer racing offering is the new R8 LMS adapted for GT4 use. The V10 can produce up to 495 horsepower depending on the series and it has just enough extra downforce to be legal. It’ll make its racing debut at this year’s Nürburgring 24 Hours.

 

I am a big Audi and Motorsport fan, so another Audi race car is really not a bad thing. The GT4 class is growing at a large rate, so it is great to see Audi supporting it. Looking forward to seeing these hitting the Australian tracks very soon.

Joel Strickland

 

Cool.

-Jeff

 

More racecars are always good, so I can’t find too much to complain about with this one. GT4 is a class lower than GT3 with less aero and less power. The intent is for them to be relatively inexpensive race cars for privateers to run. Audi (and Mercedes) have simply detuned their GT3 car to GT4 spec, and I’m not sure the price reduction has been all that much. There was talk of them upgrading the TT Cup to GT4 spec, but went this way instead. It’s hard enough to explain sports car racing series to casual fans as it is, but now Audi have thrown a wrench in the mix because someone will inevitably ask “Why is that R8 not as fast as that other R8?”

Brad Brownell

 

I was wondering that too… GT4 is supposed to be cheaper, yet within the last few months we’ve seen a McLaren 570S and now an Audi R8 converted to GT4 use. It’s going to be odd seeing these compete against Caymans and Mustangs. But it’s cool nonetheless.

Greg Kachadurian

 

Besides the fact that I am annoyed that they are using the R8 for a GT4 car AND a GT3 car, I have no problem with the car other than how it looks. Sans any livery it kinda looks like a SEMA project rather than a full blown racecar, something that it’s GT3 brother never suffered. Should be fast though, VW Group don’t make bad race cars.

-Patrick Hoffstetter

 

2018 Lincoln Navigator

Lincoln is finally rolling out an all-new Navigator. The full-size luxury SUV is comfortable, intelligent, powerful, lighter, and has a design which stays true to its concept. A twin-turbocharged V6 with 450 horsepower is standard.

[Image © 2017 Hooniverse/Ross Ballot]

 

The exterior design doesn’t do anything for me, but the interior was seriously impressive. Supremely comfortable seats and a dash layout that was shockingly good. Forward visibility seems good and you have a truly commanding feeling from the cabin, but that’s what you’d want/need/expect from a Navigator. This was one of the only vehicles at the show that Kamil and I actually went back to for a second look. I could happily sit in those seats all day. Color me impressed.

-Ross Ballot

 

The mechanicals might be similar to the Ford Expedition but Lincoln really stepped up with the interior. The seats and the dash layout and quality are Range Rover-like in execution. This is a serious, and unexpected, step up for Lincoln. Unfortunately I’m not too impressed with the exterior looks but fortunately I spend more time looking at the inside my cars than the outside.

Kamil Kaluski

 

I’ve been saying it for a few years now… Lincoln has been quietly clawing and crawling its way back. Now people are starting to notice.

-Jeff

 

It sure is purdy. Damn big, though.

Brad Brownell

 

Lumbering, luxurious sedans, usually made by Cadillac, were once referred to as Barcaloungers on wheels—which could be an insult or a compliment, depending on your perspective. Whereas the Jeep Grand Cherokee Trackhawk takes the fast-lap-times tack, this Lincoln looks luscious enough to have an extramarital affair in.

-Alan Cesar

 

[Looking at photos] “Ugh, I hate this monstrosity… Huh, 450 horsepower? Well, that could be entertaining, I suppose… Whoa, that interior is kinda nice… No, really nice—somewhere I’d love to spend some time… Tech and features are impressive…”

Yes, it’s a monstrosity. But one I’m suddenly kind of digging.

-Peter Tanshanomi

 

I encounter a previous generation Navigator every now and again here in England, and compared to other SUVs here it blots out the sun and has pedestrians shivering in its shadow. I can’t help but admire it, and often think that such behemoths offer a more worthwhile package than similarly (or more) expensive Range Rovers and their ilk. The engineering is strong and sufficient, rather than advanced and fragile, and what greater luxury is there than space? The Navigator isn’t clever, but it is big, and few cars are more imposing to look at.

-Chris Haining

 

Here’s what the Navigator will look like for the next ten years, probably. I like it.

Greg Kachadurian

 

I walked around the Ford that this Navigator is based on at the Houston Auto Show last week and was bored somewhere between mile marker four and the rear axle. Looks good and has a solid drivetrain, so it should be a good family hauler. That is, if you don’t mind the fact that you have to set up a basecamp before you walk around the damn thing.

Patrick Hoffstetter

 

2018 Jeep Grand Cherokee Trackhawk

It’s a Grand Cherokee with the Hellcat’s supercharged 6.2-liter Hemi V8. It makes all the same 707 horsepower but has AWD and the added versatility of a Jeep – a Jeep that can do 180 mph.

[Image © 2017 Hooniverse/Ross Ballot]

 

Ford in Australia made a performance Territory many years ago and it was a cool bit of kit, so seeing Jeep doing the same thing in the USA is awesome. Aussie muscle car/SUV fans will eat this thing up if it makes it to Australia

Joel Strickland

 

Nobody needs a 707hp Jeep but so many people want it. This is stupid crazy. It does 0-60 in 3.5 seconds and kills that quarter mile in 11.6 seconds. That is insane. That is faster than most sports cars. With its 7200-pound towing capacity it might be faster than your track car while towing your track car. I love it. I want it. I NEED IT!!!

Kamil Kaluski

 

It’s absurd, that’s the end of it. I do wish it looked more different from the “standard” SRT, but it’s still entirely wild and badass and everything we ever could have dreamed of. The quad exhaust tips don’t do it for me, but the drivetrain certainly does. There’s a lot of backlash out there about “why does this exist” and “what’s the point?” but honestly, I’m just happy that FCA is going all-out while they still can. And hey, if you can’t swing a sports car, “need” AWD, need to tow a semi-heavy trailer, and can only manage one vehicle that you want to be shockingly fast, this could be just that. #hellcatallthethings

Ross Ballot

 

I love insane engine swaps in the aftermarket, so why not embrace a batshit engine swap on the production side? This thing is going to prove to be hilarious and awesome fun and I can’t wait to drive it.

-Jeff

 

Back in 2012, a couple of friends at Chrysler took a Grand Cherokee SRT8 on the One Lap of America. Aside from requiring the occasional tire rotation, it finished the event happily and won the SUV class—one spot ahead of Matt Farah in a (much pricier) BMW X5M. I’d love to see the same thing done with a Trackhawk because you won’t see these doing timed laps anywhere else.

-Alan Cesar

 

This is even dumber than the Demon. I’m grumpy today…

-Brad Brownell

 

No, Brad, it’s not. Not by a longshot.

-Peter Tanshanomi

 

Fun fact that’s really only cool to me. They shot the press images in my neck of the woods, which doesn’t happen often at all. On-track shots are at Atlanta Motorsports Park and the road shots are up on a series of awesome mountain roads that I frequently play on, just north of Dahlonega around Blood Mountain. They even stopped at my usual scenic overlook on Hwy 348 for a few shots as you can see above. To me that’s almost as cool as the fact that we now have a 707-horsepower Grand Cherokee.

Greg Kachadurian

 

I love the insanity of the Trackhawk, but I abhor its pointlessness. Every time I drove an ML63 AMG I couldn’t help but be sad for the portion of its 500+ bhp that was being squandered on hauling that big square body around. It’s like taking steroids in order to put in a good 100 meter sprint while wearing wellington boots and a fat suit. I’d like to have a go in one, but I don’t reckon it’ll teach me anything new.

-Chris Haining

 

I think the idea of a Hellcat powered SUV is somehow less terrible than the Demon. I must be ill. Bet this thing fucking rips though.

Patrick Hoffstetter

 

2018 Buick Enclave

The Enclave returns with a new design inspired by the new Regal, more cabin space for up to seven passengers and their gear, new tech, slightly more power out of its V6, and a new “Avenir” trim level as a part of a new Buick sub brand.

 

There’s a new Enclave? There was a new Enclave on display at the NYIAS? I was too busy looking at the Regal TourX, which has a stupid name and stupid “active lifestyle inspired” plastic fenders, but is gorgeous and should really be what people buy instead of CUVs, but that’s a whole different story.

Ross Ballot

 

Something something “that’s a Buick??”

Greg Kachadurian

 

You know those commercials where someone walks by the Buick and doesn’t notice it? Yea, well, there is a reason for that. Mix generic styling and a brand that has fallen into obscurity and that’s what you get, a car that Ross and millions others missed. The press release, the list of features and options is unique as the exterior design.

-Kamil Kaluski

Subaru Ascent Concept

This is Subaru’s second three-row SUV concept within the last year, signaling their full intent to return to the market with something entirely new and not as ugly as the Tribeca. When it does come back, likely early next year, it’ll be named the Ascent and will be a US-exclusive. It’ll be built in Indiana.

[Image © 2017 Hooniverse/Ross Ballot]

 

Will car companies stop making cool cars for just the US market. I know the last 3 row Subaru, the Tribeca didn’t sell well in Australia, but this new Ascent concept looks awesome and it would sell in Australia.

Joel Strickland

 

Subaru isn’t fucking around here. They’re doing their three-row SUV right: big but unoffensive, handsome, and butch at the same time. It looks great and is spacious but still far from production ready judging by what was displayed. Subaru doesn’t say what engine it will have: the 4-cylinders they currently have will be inadequate and the H6 engine is too old so I’m thinking that we will see a new turbo four-cylinder powertrain in it, perhaps an optional six?

-Kamil Kaluski

 

The Ascent looks exactly as you’d expect a three-row Subaru to look. There’s a hint of B9 Tribeca in the back, but the front looks like that of a Highlander with Subaru headlights instead of those from Toyota. All in all it’s a decent looking CUV that will undoubtedly sell great, but I’m worried it’ll jeopardize sales of the already-huge Outback. I agree with Kamil about the engines; this would be the perfect opportunity to introduce either an all-new H6, a hybrid, or a combination of the two.

Ross Ballot

 

Subaru has been crushing it lately, so I imagine this too is a well-thought out vehicle for its intended segment and it will be paired with perfect marketing. Can I get an STI version though?

-Jeff

 

Could this be a peek at the new STI motor? Looks like the Ascend will get a new, direct-injected 2.4-liter turbo four-cylinder rather than the flat-sixes that have propelled Subaru’s flagships in recent history. Though the WRX has a new 2-liter turbo (FA20) that’s related to the BRZ engine, the current STI still lugs the old port-injected EJ257—a race-proven but dated engine architecture that suffers much more turbo lag than the direct-injected WRX. I’d be very surprised if the STI kept the old EJ motor much longer.

-Alan Cesar

 

Between this and the Enclave, someone, somewhere, is saying to himself, “I really became an automotive designer to do THIS…?”

-Peter Tanshanomi

 

I think the question that this raises in my mind is this: What happens to all of these models when this market collapses? Will it ever collapse, or is this just how automobiles are now? We live in weird automotive times. I bet I will see a ton of these in Austin though.

Patrick Hoffstetter

 

Toyota FT-4X Concept

It’s another 4×4 crossover aimed at allowing urbanites the chance to escape into the wilderness for the weekend. It’s designed to be efficient, rugged, and adventurous.

 

I loved the FJ, very sad to see it die. So great to see Toyota create a more modern version, also not a bad idea to get a jump on the return of Bronco.

Joel Strickland

 

This is not FJ Cruiser replacement. This isn’t even a Suzuki Samurai. This is a Honda Element. Very disappointing.

-Kamil Kaluski

 

Toyota really wants to promote the “you can have an active lifestyle if you buy this!” idea, but it falls flat on its face. That being said, there were some cool elements to it like pop-out door handles that are actually water bottles. My take: I hope they ditch the whole design ASAP. It’s better than the CH-R, but it’s by no means good. If they want to sell a more niche-aimed off-roader, bring out a true FJ successor.

Ross Ballot

 

There aren’t enough wacko quasi-futuristic concepts these days, and by that measure I really love that this exists. The styling is pretty great, in my opinion. I live in Reno, NV where a casual-outdoors car like this would be perfect. There is so much federal land here that you could literally pull off the highway and go bumping across some open hilly land. It’s got useable ground clearance and decent tires would help it get around here. It’s not a proper off-roader, but nobody uses a proper off-roader for more than a picnic in the park these days anyway. If you have to have an SUV, at least get one that looks like an SUV instead of a jacked up hatchback.

Brad Brownell

 

Meh.

-Jeff

 

This feels like your favorite uncle suggesting you go to rave together. You sincerely like the guy, sure, but…no.

-Peter Tanshanomi

 

Aww, C’mon everybody. Where’s the love? This is Toyota testing the waters for a funky, compact and probably affordable quasi-utility vehicle. Looks like a bunch of fun to me. And why does everything have to be “the next X” or “a true follow-up to the Y”. Those cars wouldn’t have been been discontinued if they were worth selling. I say we act grateful that Toyota is acknowledging its past and not plundering it.

-Chris Haining

 

It’s the least stupid “concept for millennials” I’ve seen, so… congrats? But I can’t deny that it does excite me a little bit. I can’t imagine buying something like this but I understand why someone else would. Something like this would be neat to see on a dealer lot one day.

Greg Kachadurian

 

This reminds me of the bullshit sentence the Jeep PR lady threw at us at the Houston Show. “We believe that 100% of our customers take our vehicles off-road, either in actuality, or in their mind”. This looks squarely aimed at the latter.

Patrick Hoffstetter

 

^Okay, that’s one of the funniest things I’ve ever heard from this industry. I guess that “either in actuality, or in their mind” part can explain a lot of weird cars. BMW X6M owners are on the track every weekend, in their mind.

Greg Kachadurian

 

2018 Acura TLX

Acura revealed a refreshed and enhanced 2018 TLX with a more aggressive look, a new sport trim level, and some updated tech. The biggest news here is the polarizing beak grille is gone.

 

This is the case where small changes make a big difference to an otherwise good car. I wished that Acura would have dropped their 2.0-liter turbo engine but the powertrain remains unchanged.

Kamil Kaluski

 

Surprisingly good looking. Kamil is right, the subtle differences have made this a pretty attractive car overall. The interior seems great and the exterior finally is good looking enough to actually draw attention. It certainly helps that the NSX was nearby.

Ross Ballot

 

Stop saying Kamil is right, that only encourages him… but he is right here. Dammit.

-Jeff

 

Acura’s new corporate grille works really well. The beak is dead, long live the diamond pentagon.

-Brad Brownell

 

I am founding the Acura Beak Defense Force. That isn’t to say I don’t like the update, I just think the older model was more attractive across the board.

Patrick Hoffstetter

 

2018 Hyundai Sonata

Hyundai debuted a refreshed 2018 Sonata. The highlights are its significantly new design, refreshed interior, refined suspension, and a new eight-speed automatic on the 2.0-liter turbo models.

 

Hyundai’s doing great things these days but I honestly didn’t so much as looked at their booth aside from the Ioniq line which only happened because the cars were immediately behind the Ford GT.

-Ross Ballot

 

I’m hoping Genesis interior bits start trickling down into the Hyundai lineup. I’ve recently driven both the G80 and G90 sedans, and they were supremely quiet and comfortable.

-Jeff

 

The Ford Taurus has really pushed sedan exterior design toward a new standard of elegance. Hyundai is following their lead.

-Alan Cesar

 

Looking at it from back to front: sophisticated angles, smooth profile, tasteful creases…GRILLE!!!!

Yikes.

-Peter Tanshanomi

 

Not so long ago, Hyundai was beginning to prove itself has having gained a new confidence, a strong new design direction and the confidence to take on all comers. Sadly, things seem to have gone awry somewhere along the line. While they’ve probably done a great job of making the Sonata truly competent, it barely registers for wantability. I know that the Hyundai heartland prefers sensible to sexy, but Hyundai could have offered both with just a little more effort.

-Chris Haining

 

  • Citric

    What’s with the weird floating roof panel trend on these big SUVs? The Buick is the latest example of it, and I can’t help it would look more interesting if they went with the creative chrome strip from the Regal wagon than this weird Murano knockoff look. Still, I’m otherwise more positive about it than everyone else, which is good, since around here it’s what retired farmers buy with the cash from their equipment auction, so I’m going to see them everywhere.

    Also, someone needs to tell Hyundai they don’t need to have a giant grille like everyone else.

  • Sjalabais

    Please tell me the people standing next to the Navigator are all weirdly well-proportioned midgets.

    • Maymar

      Oh no, they’re enormous – about 6ft tall, and with roughly the same footprint as a Maybach.

  • AlexG55

    Buick Enclave- so called because it’s approximately the size of San Marino.

    I think the old one was the largest unibody car you could buy.

    • outback_ute

      Smaller than a Rolls Royce Phantom

  • CraigSu

    “…pop-out door handles that are actually water bottles.” ?!?!?! BWAHAHAHAHA!!!! Seriously?

    • Vairship

      You mean you don’t want the water in your water bottle to be warmed by the sun all day long? Or for your door handle to shatter because the water inside froze?

    • Vairship

      Plus it’s sanitary, because homeless people/drunks can now pee into your door handle instead of in a park.

  • ptschett

    If the Demon bothers you, keep in mind that there are vehicles on sale today that both outdo its 1/4-mile performance and can be had for Kia Forte $$: liter bikes. And I wouldn’t be surprised if just the Japanese big four crank out more of those in a year than the number of Demons that Dodge is going to ever build.

  • outback_ute

    1. Don’t take financial advice from auto writers (Kamil on the Demon)
    2. Agreed on the GT4/GT3 thing, but I gave up on GT4 as a “cheaper GT racing” category when the air shifted gearbox came in the GT4 Mustang.
    3. The Toyota Renegade?
    4. Geez that Subaru has an ugly pig dog nose.

  • Maymar

    LX IS NOT A GODDAMN OLD BENZ CHASSIS COME AT ME BRO I WILL FITE U LIKE A INTERNET TOUGH GUY

    • Greg Kachadurian

      Get in line 😛