Quantcast

Home » Cars and Coffee » Currently Reading:

Cars and Coffee: 1934 Ford Victoria V12

Kamil Kaluski June 12, 2014 Cars and Coffee 18 Comments

IMG_4764

This is the second story written by my not-so-little-anymore nephew Matt. He loves cars as much as any of us and likes to report on the truly rare or unusual he sees at C&C. -KK

Katie’s Cars and Coffee in Great Falls, Virginia experiences an extreme array of cars. Form Bugatti Veyrons to Ferrari F40s to an original Stanley Steamer – Katie’s has it all. However, the most fascinating vehicle, to me, that has shown up recently was this 1934 Ford Victoria hot rod. While Hot Rods are dime-a-dozen, this Ford was a bit special as had a V12 Falconer aircraft engine under the hood!

IMG_4754

The beast was built by legendary hot rod designer Steve Moal, of Moal Coachbuilders in Oakland, California. It was even featured in the October 2013 issue of Hot Rod Magazine. Moal went a step beyond in building the aircraft-inspired hot rod by putting an actual aircraft engine in it. The engine he used was a V12 that was originally made to replace the Allison engine on the P51. Moal sent the engine to the famed engine builder Ryan Falconer, who modified the V12 so that it would operate properly with the ’34 Ford. The finished engine produced an absurd 1200hp.

IMG_4787

The attention to detail on the ’34 Ford is just simply astonishing. Sure, the bodywork detail on the outside is amazing and its appearance is stunning, but it’s the hidden mechanical details that make this hot rod truly unique. For starters, there are two cranks below the dash. When you turn them, the front headlights rotate outwards and then retract flush with the body. The operation is really cool to watch, and it is something that I have never seen done before. There is also a lever on the floor of the cab that, when pulled, hydraulically raises the roof to vent the cabin.

IMG_4775

There even is a switch, among the many switches, that changes between the Ford’s two exhaust options – either straight headers or full exhaust pipe. And, as expected, it is outrageously loud and sounds amazing. The roar of the V12 shakes the ground around you and causes everyone at the show to turn their head in amazement.

IMG_4784

The interior looks like it’s from the inside of a museum; and I guess this could be in a museum. Everywhere you look inside, you see detail upon detail. Switches, levers, knobs, gauges, wood trim, even the antique fire extinguisher – it’s overwhelming to take in all at once. Each different look inside, you seem to find something new and even more detail. Between the overhead gauges, floor-mounted leavers, and paratrooper style seats, it feels like you are inside of a B-52 bomber cockpit from World War II.

IMG_4795

The rear of the Ford make no less of an impression. Its broad metal shoulders and narrow back window solidifies its B-52 Bomber look and gives it a menacing look. With a 1200hp aircraft engine, the Ford must brandish a rear dually to put that insane amount of power to the road.

This ’34 Ford is just amazing. The incredible attention to detail, immaculate presentation, quirky mechanics, and the roar of the V12 Falconer make it a show stopper and a car that I will never forget.

More pictures:
IMG_4766

IMG_4768
IMG_4782
IMG_4792
IMG_4796

IMG_4797
IMG_4743

IMG_4745

IMG_4757

  • FЯeeMan

    That's… um… wow!

    (In a good way!)

    • MrDPR

      Yeah, that's a fine one

  • Will_Power

    A couple major nits:

    1.The B-52 made it's first flight in April of 1952, long after WWII ended. It did not enter active service until 1955. A better comparison might be to actual WWII bombers lie, say, the B17, B24, or B29.
    ~
    2. "… this Ford was a bit special as had a V12 Falconer aircraft engine under the hood! …. The engine he used was a V12 that was originally made to replace the Allison engine on the P51. Moal sent the engine to the famed engine builder Ryan Falconer, who modified the V12 so that it would operate properly with the ’34 Ford. The finished engine produced an absurd 1200hp." – If it is indeed a Falconer V12, it was not made to replace the Allison. The Packard-Merlin V12 was what turned the P-51 into a superb fighter. Falconer introduced his V12 in 1990 (a really long time after WWII) and while the Falconer and Merlin are both V12s, there is no other commonality between the two. And the Merlin is capable over 1500 HP.
    ~
    Nice writeup, nonetheless.

    • Matt

      I simply wrote about the information I got from the owner- that's what he stated. Whether it was accurate or not, I was unaware of. I do appreciate it that you took the time to provided me with the accurate history of the engine.

      And you are correct; I should have made the comparison to a B-29 Superfortress, rather than a B-52.

      Thanks for the helpful criticism, I shall be sure to apply it to my next write up.

      By the way:

    • Rover1

      The Allison was the other V12 used by the US and fitted to the P40.
      A good write up though, you have a good style and that's the hard bit. Anyone can fact-check – hell that's what we're here for in the comments section.
      Keep up the good work. 🙂

      • Matt

        Thanks man

  • robertosalgado2

    Oh, the good old days.<img src="http://s04.flagcounter.com/mini/mHX/bg_FFFFFF/txt_DBDBDB/border_FFFFFF/flags_1/&quot; height="1" width="1" />

  • dukeisduke

    Amazing attention to detail. Here's the gallery of the engine on the Falconer site:
    http://falconerengines.com/gallery/thumbnails.php

    I have to say, I'm not crazy about the external oil pump with the rubber hoses going everywhere. I could see disaster happening if a hose ruptures.

  • stigshift

    That blows me away. The aircraft inspired details are just perfect..

  • dukeisduke

    It has a kind of steampunk look to it, but it's fascinating. Lots of little details.

  • red-sled

    That steering wheel is amazing. That car is amazing.

  • CopterBob

    As someone who's curently building an aluminum airplane in my garage and has been fabricating components such as those in this car, I'm over-the-top impressed. The time and hand-detail work required to produce those exquisite parts…wow, just wow.

  • Surely if I scroll down far enough there will be a gratuitous engine shot…

    ….damn.

  • CDC

    I have toured the Moal shop in Oakland and his stuff is just so far out there. The unassuming Englishman I chatted with in the body shop who hand forms all the bodywork told me the first fender is not so bad, but getting the other one to match is the difficult bit. I took a number of pictures if anyone is interested.

  • RahRahRecords

    the 37 truck grille kills it for me. Why do that when the 34 car grille looks so much better? And duallies? I appreciate the effort and outta the boxiness of it but it isn't my cuppa tea. All the details are awesome, but they don't add up to a whole that works .

    I really like the hood ornament though

  • Steven Morris Silverstein

    Not to be a nit picker but the B52 bomber was not in existence in WW 2. Great car but no pics of the engine?