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Classically cool Cortina wagon packs a V8 sleeper punch

Jeff Glucker June 3, 2014 For Sale 8 Comments

cortina v8 wagon

“Oh wow”, was my first thought when I came upon this Cortina wagon. “Holy s*#t!” was my second thought upon reading more about the car. Click past the break to find out why…

cortina v8 wagon engine

That is a 302 V8 fitting oh so perfectly betwixt the fenders of this lovely longroof. It’s a 1969 Ford Cortina Estate, and the model year means it’s a second generation car. The most powerful engine offered up for the Cortina at the time was a 1.6-liter inline four-cylinder unit. This 302 should churn out quite a bit more power.

Here’s the full ad (in case it goes away, like a beautiful unicorn riding off into the sunset):

1969 Cortina Estate/ Station Wagon. Originally a Deluxe, now with a 302 and 5-speed, with GT suspension, brakes and gauges. Added are 1600E wood door trims and rear badge. It remains mostly stock in its appearance so it is a ‘sleeper’. With the mild V8 and top of the line trim, it is the Cadillac of the marque. This car was built for my own use, and comes out of my collection of ten Cortinas. I deep raided my parts bin to make this one of the best.
The engine is date coded 1980 with an aluminum 2 barrel intake, 60’s Mustang fastback iron exhaust manifolds, and an ’84 Mustang GT crank and camshaft. Gobs of smooth torque is the result of this spec. The trans is a brand new, 1984 World Class T5, with a Pinto cable clutch upgrade. The 8″ rear axle is from a trusty Mustang II with 3.0 gears. Powering it all is a Delco alternator. Cooling duties are handled by a fresh V8 three row radiator and a flex fan.
The front brakes are upped to the larger Cortina GT rotors and GT calipers with new pads. Once again that trusty Mustang II provided the rear drums which are the same size as GT. It was converted to a single master cylinder to clear the left valve cover.
The front suspension has ’67 GT coils, classic Koni adjustable inserts and RS bushings. The rear is stock Estate leaf springs with a tube shock conversion. The 13″ X 5″ ‘Libra’ rims came from a Capri, and are completely original and untouched.
The body was assembled in July of 1969 in Dagenham England. The V8 Estate amazingly still has most of its original factory Ermine White paint, but with the dings and scratches you would expect after nearly 45 years. It has had some professional repairs, and careful touchups to those dings. The original chrome has stood up well. 42,000 miles shows on the odometer, believed to be original and a SoCal car its whole life. Everything works on the car. All the glass and rubber are original with a nice windshield. NOS rear lamp lenses.
The interior has a fresh Acme carpet kit, with clean ’68 velour seats in the front. The folding rear seat is has its original vinyl. All the door panels and cargo area cards are in place in factory black. The dash is nice but slightly cracked in places. A wood rimmed Formula GT wheel has replaced the factory one (included). GT gauges are fronted by a GT woodgrain dash insert. 
This longroof weighs about 2400 pounds ready to drive. The stock weight of an Estate is about 2200. It represents the marriage of a lightweight English body shell and American grunt, ala Cobra and Tiger. That Small Block Ford gives this car remarkable driveablility and flexibility, and it must be driven to be appreciated. It is set up as a driver and would make a great commuter car, while you rock out to the period AM radio. Original owner’s manual and warranty card included.
Clear title, reflective plates.
A rare opportunity to own this unique car. I do not know of another V8 Mk II Estate anywhere.

The asking price is $11,995. Based on the rarity of the car, and what appears to be a quality swap, the price seems just about right. Additionally, you could alway turn back to the seller for help or with questions since he says this is just one of his TEN CORTINAS!

I need to meet this guy…

[Source: Craigslist]

  • Van_Sarockin

    Magnificent! The engine seems to fit without any bother at all. Which makes me wonder where FoMoCo was at the time? Were UK displacement taxes that high? Or fuel costs so dear that no one would have bought any? V-8ALLTHECORTINAS!

  • UDman

    Ahem…. http://hooniverse.com/2014/03/08/weekend-edition-

    Sorry Jeff, but I had to do it…

  • Waywords

    I noticed that, too. But the price is $1,000 less now!

  • wunno sev

    thought one:
    wow, that's a '59? looks four or five years younger than that to me.

    thought two:
    This car was built for my own use, and comes out of my collection of ten Cortinas.
    this guy. wow.

    • wunno sev

      oh – it's a '69.

      and the hooniverse write-up noted the ten cortinas already.

      welp. guess it's time for bed.

  • tonyola

    I always thought that the second-gen Cortina was somewhat handsome. They used to be fairly popular here in the US in the late '60s, but then it died in favor of the (shudder) Pinto.