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For Sale – 1982 Alfa Romeo Giulietta

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In the comments of yesterday’s Rover post, the esteemed commentator, mr. mzs zsm msz esq told the tale of how he was reunited with his favorite model car from his childhood. That reminded me of one of my dearest favorites, a red Alfa Giulietta made by Majorette. I can’t tell you the exact place where the scale model Alfa now lies, but I can show you the car it replicated fairly well for a small die-cast model from the ’80s.

This red 1:1 size Giulietta is for sale by a Dutch classic car dealer, and it’s absolutely flawless. While my small Alfa had paint peeling as soon as I got my hands on it, this barely has a ding on it. Take a look.

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The 1982 Giulietta here is a 1600cc twin-cam car, so it’s not the quickest one of the line-up as you could’ve had the vehicle with a two-litre turbo engine producing 175 hp. This has a modest 110hp, and it’s the second-series car of the 1977-introduced Nuova Giulietta, the first of two facelifts. The Giulietta was heavily based on the Alfetta running gear, and it was succeeded by the 75/Milano, which continued to have a rear-mounted transaxle.

This car is a 70 000 km French import, and it has been exceptionally well preserved with no rust whatsoever and with original paint everywhere except on the hood. The ad notes that “all of the known weak spots are in new condition”, which is certainly persuasive.

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Viewed side-on, the Giulietta is slightly easier on the eye than the 75, as there is no wildly angled trim and the amount of plastic is less heavy. Red probably suits the car the best, and it matches the unpainted bumpers well.

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The engine bay continues the near-new theme of the car. Despite being smallish, the 1600cc engine is not the smallest of the lot as you could have had your Giulietta with a 1300cc engine if your funds extended no further. That too came with 95 hp, which for a 1.3 is a reasonable output, but you surely had to beat it with a big stick to get power out of it. Luckily the slightest Giulietta only weighed 1100kg.

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Inside, the steering wheel and gearshift have originally been replaced with wooden parts. The ad notes the original ones follow with the car, as do the original steel wheels as the alloys under the car are aftermarket ones. All the paperwork, service records, brochures and all are also included.

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What about the price? Well, it’s not supercheap, unlike yesterday’s Rover. The Dutch seller is asking 8800 euro for the car, but the exhaustive amount of photos do back the asking price up. It’s difficult to find a flaw from the car, unless the diminutive engine size is one.

See the listing here

[Source: Ruyl Classics]

Currently there are "24 comments" on this Article:

  1. C107 says:

    nice car, rarely ever seen. but …. mmmh … that's not a french licence plate, and dutch it ain't either?

  2. Alcology says:

    It looks strange to me, almost like motion blur during design as if the brakes were slammed on and the rear popped up, but then dropped down again while keeping the height of the endo if that makes sense. Still a very cool survivor.

  3. Guillaume says:

    It is a French licence plate. This numbering system exist since 2009 (technically the plates shouldn't be black so that's misleading)

    • Vavon says:

      You can have the new numbering system on black plates if:
      – the car is before a certain year (1996?) and has a classic car title
      – the classic car title is known as the "Carte Grise Collection" in French.

  4. Vavon says:

    I had that Majorette Alfa Romeo Giulietta too. It was a rather good model of the real thing.
    <img src="http://p7.storage.canalblog.com/78/13/1029363/80852697_o.jpg&quot; width="600/">

    • MVEilenstein says:

      Right angles and straight lines are easy to replicate.

    • CJinSD says:

      I had a die-cast model of a rally version of this car. Seeing the photos reminded me of its existence. Mine was about 1:24 scale, and it was red with white stripes. I have no idea what happened to it. Perhaps my mother boxed it up somewhere when she turned my childhood bedroom into an office while I was at college. I might look for it when I visit my folks for Christmas. I lived in the Netherlands in 1984. These cars were fairly common. Sadly, many of the ones I saw on the street were already rusting with a vengeance, and they were not old at the time. Maybe that's why this survivor can command such a high price. Ironic.

    • julkinen says:

      Yes, that's the exact one. I loved mine.

  5. salguod says:

    Is the engine leaning to the driver's side? Is it supposed to?

  6. Van_Sarockin says:

    Wow, I didn't know they'd made this. Interesting, but I think I still prefer the Alfettas and the Milanos. And it's probably more fun to drive it daily with the smaller engine, you've gotta mash the throttle, shift like mad,late brake, attack the corners and never let up, just to stay even with traffic.

    • Dean Bigglesworth says:

      Even with the 110hp 1.6 it still has 100hp/ton power to weight ratio, i don't know about the US of A but around here the majority of cars are still way under that.

      • Van_Sarockin says:

        That looks like 22 lbs/hp, which is kind of anemic in these parts. Still, flogging a 128 around was always tremendous fun.

        What's stupid, is all the folks in Porsches and Ferraris who can't get out of second gear without losing their licenses.

        • Dean Bigglesworth says:

          100hp/ton is pretty uch what is considered the minimum for a car to be fun if the chassis is good. A 100kg car with 100hp is decently peppy, and a 2ton car with 200hp is not exactly slow either. Not fast, but certainly not slow.

          I think really powerful cars on the street are frustrating.. Even with a 300hp car you can only really step on it for a few seconds before you're in the "lose your license for months" territory…

          • CJinSD says:

            The 200hp, 2 ton car will actually be effected less by the weight of passengers and cargo than the 100 hp, 1 ton car. I agree with you that there is a point of diminishing returns. I have a car that feels fairly quick but takes over 6 seconds to hit 60 mph. I can wind it to 8,000 rpm in 3rd gear on freeway entrance ramps without getting into the really big ticket zone. It's actually more fun than my company car, which has a supercharged engine and an automatic transmission and needs an alarm to tell you when you're crossing over from getting a speeding ticket to going straight to jail.

          • Vairship says:

            A 100kg car with 100hp certainly WOULD be peppy! ;-)

          • julkinen says:

            This is why I love my 518i. I can really use the throttle without reaching the speed limits too early. :)

    • Maymar says:

      That's pretty close to the same power to weight ratio as my slushbox'd Accent, which very rarely gets left behind by traffic. There's a reason I get ~23mpg.

      Of course, with the stick, it should be a little peppier, and a bit of a hoot.

  7. Maymar says:

    It's hideous.

    I want it.

  8. CJinSD says:

    Having poured over my magazines and Alfa brochures as a car crazy 14 year old, the Nuova Giulietta to have was the 1.8 liter version. It was almost 2 seconds quicker to 60 mph than the 1.6 liter, had a top speed over 112 mph, and didn't use much more fuel. The 2.0 wasn't much quicker while being thirstier, and the turbos were turbos. Worse than that, they were carbureted turbos. The less said about them, the better. There was also a diesel, but it was from back when 19 second 0-60 times were expected in European diesel cars. Besides, the engine was the point when Alfas were worthwhile cars.

  9. Buickboy92 says:

    Love everything about it!

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