Quantcast

Home » All Things Hoon »Weekend Edition » Currently Reading:

Hooniverse Weekend of Weird Ass Crap: The Yugo Edition

When this olelongrooffan still lived over in the Taj Mahal there Beachside in the Birthplace of Speed, I unwittingly parked next to an irrigation head that spewed sulphur water through it every other nite. As a result, the passenger side of my oldbeaterpickemup truck was constantly covered in a rust colored film from that from that water. Usually every week or so, I would run a pressure washer over it and cleanse of that film. However, the headlight on the passenger side became etched and started to retain water. As a result, during night time driving, it appeared as if that old truck had only one headlight working, although both were lit. Now, I can hear my fellow Hoons wondering what the hell this has to do with a Yugo?

Well my fellow Hoons, my new abode is located above a streetrodbuilding dudes’s shop and it is within shouting distance of my local U-Pull-It so this olelongrooffan thought I would head over there and pick up and elcheap sealed beam headlamp for my Comanche and while there see what could be seen. Well, this Yugo was one of those things.


Well, after acquiring, not one but, two sealed beam headlamps for my Indian, I wandered around the remainder of the MOPAR section of that wrecking yard then headed over to the import section to see what could be seen. Just when this olelongrooffan thought all I was going to see would be a bunch of 80′s and 90′s era Asian and Swedish products, this old Yugo was spotted. It made my day. And while not the weirdest thing you have seen this weekend, this olelongrooffan believes it is certainly weird enough to warrant inclusion here this UDManless weekend.

And I cannot fathom any reason this Pink Floyd wallet (empty of course) would be under the bonnet of this Yugoslavian sourced automobile.

YUGO FOR LIFE…that elicited almost as big of a chuckle as did Annti’s Fiat 500 post earlier today.

And that damn Ms. Martin beat this olelongrooffan to yet another vehicle as every badge on it was long gone to serve as Garage Art.

Proudly posted on the shock tower on the passenger’s side of this old beauty.

And it really doesn’t matter if you replace all of this stuff at 35,000 miles, this Yugo is still going to die at 72K.

Image Copyright Hooniverse 2012/longrooffan

 

Currently there are "17 comments" on this Article:

  1. lilpoindexter says:

    Not even my 5.0 mustang (when I was 23) required a clutch at 35k.

  2. xlmedia says:

    Timing belt, clutch and brakes replaced at 35k? Most people would groan if all that stuff had to be replaced at 65k. With expectations of those parts lasting 100k or more, it's no wonder many people turned their nose up at Yugo and other cheap cars with needy maintenance requirements.

  3. dukeisduke says:

    "YUGO FOR LIFE"? I thought it was "Volvo. For Life".

  4. Van_Sarockin says:

    The real question would be, 'Why is this Yugo in the boneyard anyways?' Pretty optimistic to think there's someone out there trying to keep their DD/trailer queen Yugo patched togather.

  5. Felis_Concolor says:

    The better part of 2 decades ago, I saw a Yugo featured in the opening column of a well known magazine dedicated to aftermarket hot rods and with a natural bias towards vintage American iron. Compared to the pump gas 9-second wonders featured within, its high 13s in the quarter mile were not especially impressive – until you reminded yourself it was a Yugo and running on the same block and heads originally fitted at the factory. The builder had managed to eke out every single dyne of power from the engine, even going so far as to implement a loss-based oiling system, the better to let the piston rings slide freely. The oversized air filter sat atop a carburetor which poked through the hood, and was held in place by a long threaded shaft and wing nut compressing a simple can around the filter element which acted as the dust and debris shield. The paint was its original oxidized hue; the wheels were very unkempt Yokohama A001Rs; the visual feel was that of a barely surviving relic. Among low buck hot rods, that one should rank right up in anyone's Top 5, especially when one considers the enormous handicap the builder chose to begin with.

    I can only imagine how many cocky kids – and adults – found their entire universe come crashing down around them when they found themselves at the receiving end of a stoplight beatdown beneath the wheels of a Yugo.

  6. Vavon says:

    <img src="http://www.carsmaniaboutik.com/WebRoot/ce_fr3/Shops/294445/4FB5/29EF/BFE6/5A3F/EDB3/C0A8/8008/C2FE/Victor_H_cars_2.JPG&quot; width="600/">
    Today I saw this in the supermarket and thought how weird, seeing a toy model of a Yugo… And now this!

  7. stigshift says:

    I actually owned one of these back int the day, bought well used with 62k on it. The friend I bought it off of got it from his next door neighbor, a mechanic. Allegedly. Was informed that the timing belt had, indeed, been replaced by said mechanic. I loved driving the little fucker. Slow, but felt peppy. I paid $9.99 each for a set of four brand new tires for it! Even on those shitty tires it handled like a slot car. I'm 6'4" and could actually sit behind the drivers seat with the seat adjusted for me. With headroom! That thing was like a phone booth for four inside. Th e fun died when the ORIGINAL timing belt died on cue at 66k. I actually still miss it. Then again, I bought an X1/9 a few years later. I don't like normal cars. They bore me.

    • Van_Sarockin says:

      Well, the Yugo was pretty much a rewarmed FIAT 127, rewarmed for the Warsaw Pact. So your experience makes perfect sense. The problem was that the car was good for a world that was twenty years past, and no one wanted to put up with the modest performance, or the regular maintenance that was needed. And most of the folks buying them were moving up from clapped out beaters into their first new car. You just can't abuse a Yugo like an old Beetle or Impala or Dart. Personally, I've always had a bit of a thing for the 127. Maybe not so much as for the 850. But I always thought they were a logical successor to the original Mini.

  8. stigsift says:

    I wouldn't give it credit as a Mini successor. None of Issigonis' vision in it. It was a transportation implement that in spirited hands was a comically fun car to daily drive. Hell, I could drag race people and LOSE and they never knew they were racing. But I did think about your take on it for awhile before I responded. Your point of view is quite valid, but I think the Mini's torch was tossed to the original Honda Civic.

Search

Hooniverse Marketplace

Featuring Top 2/3 of vehicles Available in Marketplace

Read more





Subscribe via RSS